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Date: 10 Dec 2006 07:33:43
From:
Subject: Vibiemme Domobar versus Gaggia Synchrony...
_________________________________________________________________________________
I have a bit of a dillemma if you could help me w/...
I have basically came down to two choices (available via my local
dealers, anything else is not an option for me), the above mentioned
Domobar (single) and all-in-one Gaggia Synchrony Digital (or Saeco
Royal - which seem the same or similar).
My ultimate goal is to make the best possible home-brewed espresso,
like in restaurants/caffees - have had the Krups and that was a real
disappointment.
Vibiemme seems like the best bet for home use - while it's more work,
requires good grinding etc. (btw. how much is that essential? i.e w/
not so much time spent on good coffee preparation would I still be
getting a decent coffee?). On the other side, automatics provide easy
and fast coffee - while I'm not sure about the two things - quality of
the coffee and quality of the machines, have heard about many problems
w/ electronics and similar?
btw. price is more less the same - Vibiemme a bit more espensive as I'd
have to get a good grinder (are Gaggia grinders ok enough?).
What would you recommend?
Thanks to all,
_________________________________________________________________________________





 
Date: 11 Dec 2006 13:43:59
From:
Subject: Re: Vibiemme Domobar versus Gaggia Synchrony...
Thanks a lot! Your post was exactly what I needed - and it was timely
too. Actually I already have a Vibiemme w/ me here, just got it a few
hours ago, made a first few coffees, feel much better now :). And in
the next few days I'm going to shop for a good grinder. They (the local
dealer) don't have the Mazer nor ROcky - but I'm offered a
Carimali/Obel M Junior
(http://www.carimali.com/inglese/prodotti/prodotti.asp?id_prodotto=16),
they assure me that is very good, but I'm not sure yet (it's not w/
conical burrs, but it's a burr grinder) - the other option is a
professional San co etc. - I'm still having some doubts...
And what you said about the grinders, I'm getting more and more aware
of it (and how you put it, coffee machine being an accessory, a good
one) - didn't realize how important that was - but after a few
espressos I made, it seems like a good grinder is the only way to go
(first impression at least).
THanks a lot again - cheers!
Dragan

Lloyd Parsons wrote:
> In article <1165764823.180958.239060@16g2000cwy.googlegroups.com>,
> ns.gaga@gmail.com wrote:
>
> > ______________________________________________________________________________
> > ___
> > I have a bit of a dillemma if you could help me w/...
> > I have basically came down to two choices (available via my local
> > dealers, anything else is not an option for me), the above mentioned
> > Domobar (single) and all-in-one Gaggia Synchrony Digital (or Saeco
> > Royal - which seem the same or similar).
> > My ultimate goal is to make the best possible home-brewed espresso,
> > like in restaurants/caffees - have had the Krups and that was a real
> > disappointment.
> > Vibiemme seems like the best bet for home use - while it's more work,
> > requires good grinding etc. (btw. how much is that essential? i.e w/
> > not so much time spent on good coffee preparation would I still be
> > getting a decent coffee?). On the other side, automatics provide easy
> > and fast coffee - while I'm not sure about the two things - quality of
> > the coffee and quality of the machines, have heard about many problems
> > w/ electronics and similar?
> > btw. price is more less the same - Vibiemme a bit more espensive as I'd
> > have to get a good grinder (are Gaggia grinders ok enough?).
> > What would you recommend?
> > Thanks to all,
> > ______________________________________________________________________________
> > ___
>
> With a good grinder and espresso machine, coupled with freshly roasted
> beans, you can produce a cup better than many coffee shops and certainly
> much better than most restaurants.
>
> In many venues, the espresso machine is considered an accessory to the
> grinder. Yes, the grinder is the most important part of producing good
> to excellent espresso.
>
> For that reason, the super autos all fall apart, or at least the ones
> for the home ket. Their grinders are just not up to the task.
>
> Two days ago, I would have recommended the Gaggia MDF as being more than
> adequate, and it is certainly better than the cheaper grinders. But
> yesterday I got my Mazzer Super Jolly and produced a cup I've never
> experienced before. It was an amazing experience! I had never tasted
> an espresso that I really liked, couldn't ever taste the things others
> had said were in the cup. But yesterday I did. All because of the
> grinder. I think it is more that the MDF just doesn't allow the tuning
> of the grind because the steps are too big than anything else.
>
> So with that in mind, I would pick the Vibiemme over the super auto. I
> would then look at a very good grinder. Used Super Jolly, like mine, go
> for around $250-300 on Ebay and figure a new set of burrs for another
> $30 or so.
>
> Or get a Mazzer or Macap new in the $400 range. You may be able to get
> your local dealer to do a package deal, most online ones will. Usually
> knocking $75-$100 off for a machine/grinder package. At this level,
> these are not low gin items, so they should be able to wiggle a bit.
>
> To get the very best results ensure you have a good grinder, good
> espresso machine and a source for freshly roasted beans. If you have
> those three things, you can produce a truly excellent espresso.



  
Date: 11 Dec 2006 16:16:50
From: Lloyd Parsons
Subject: Re: Vibiemme Domobar versus Gaggia Synchrony...
Glad I could be of service.

I looked all over the place for some info about that grinder and nothing
except your link. There are some references to their espresso machines,
but not many of them either.

As to the La San co grinders, well I never could find a review and a
posting that I made somewhere elicited absolutely no feedback, so I
don't know squat about them either.

But you can't go wrong with Mazzer or Macap. But if budget is a bit
tight, then the Rancilio Rocky is like by many.


> Thanks a lot! Your post was exactly what I needed - and it was timely
> too. Actually I already have a Vibiemme w/ me here, just got it a few
> hours ago, made a first few coffees, feel much better now :). And in
> the next few days I'm going to shop for a good grinder. They (the local
> dealer) don't have the Mazer nor ROcky - but I'm offered a
> Carimali/Obel M Junior
> (http://www.carimali.com/inglese/prodotti/prodotti.asp?id_prodotto=16),
> they assure me that is very good, but I'm not sure yet (it's not w/
> conical burrs, but it's a burr grinder) - the other option is a
> professional San co etc. - I'm still having some doubts...
> And what you said about the grinders, I'm getting more and more aware
> of it (and how you put it, coffee machine being an accessory, a good
> one) - didn't realize how important that was - but after a few
> espressos I made, it seems like a good grinder is the only way to go
> (first impression at least).
> THanks a lot again - cheers!
> Dragan
>
> Lloyd Parsons wrote:
> > In article <1165764823.180958.239060@16g2000cwy.googlegroups.com>,
> > ns.gaga@gmail.com wrote:
> >
> > > __________________________________________________________________________
> > > ____
> > > ___
> > > I have a bit of a dillemma if you could help me w/...
> > > I have basically came down to two choices (available via my local
> > > dealers, anything else is not an option for me), the above mentioned
> > > Domobar (single) and all-in-one Gaggia Synchrony Digital (or Saeco
> > > Royal - which seem the same or similar).
> > > My ultimate goal is to make the best possible home-brewed espresso,
> > > like in restaurants/caffees - have had the Krups and that was a real
> > > disappointment.
> > > Vibiemme seems like the best bet for home use - while it's more work,
> > > requires good grinding etc. (btw. how much is that essential? i.e w/
> > > not so much time spent on good coffee preparation would I still be
> > > getting a decent coffee?). On the other side, automatics provide easy
> > > and fast coffee - while I'm not sure about the two things - quality of
> > > the coffee and quality of the machines, have heard about many problems
> > > w/ electronics and similar?
> > > btw. price is more less the same - Vibiemme a bit more espensive as I'd
> > > have to get a good grinder (are Gaggia grinders ok enough?).
> > > What would you recommend?
> > > Thanks to all,
> > > __________________________________________________________________________
> > > ____
> > > ___
> >
> > With a good grinder and espresso machine, coupled with freshly roasted
> > beans, you can produce a cup better than many coffee shops and certainly
> > much better than most restaurants.
> >
> > In many venues, the espresso machine is considered an accessory to the
> > grinder. Yes, the grinder is the most important part of producing good
> > to excellent espresso.
> >
> > For that reason, the super autos all fall apart, or at least the ones
> > for the home ket. Their grinders are just not up to the task.
> >
> > Two days ago, I would have recommended the Gaggia MDF as being more than
> > adequate, and it is certainly better than the cheaper grinders. But
> > yesterday I got my Mazzer Super Jolly and produced a cup I've never
> > experienced before. It was an amazing experience! I had never tasted
> > an espresso that I really liked, couldn't ever taste the things others
> > had said were in the cup. But yesterday I did. All because of the
> > grinder. I think it is more that the MDF just doesn't allow the tuning
> > of the grind because the steps are too big than anything else.
> >
> > So with that in mind, I would pick the Vibiemme over the super auto. I
> > would then look at a very good grinder. Used Super Jolly, like mine, go
> > for around $250-300 on Ebay and figure a new set of burrs for another
> > $30 or so.
> >
> > Or get a Mazzer or Macap new in the $400 range. You may be able to get
> > your local dealer to do a package deal, most online ones will. Usually
> > knocking $75-$100 off for a machine/grinder package. At this level,
> > these are not low gin items, so they should be able to wiggle a bit.
> >
> > To get the very best results ensure you have a good grinder, good
> > espresso machine and a source for freshly roasted beans. If you have
> > those three things, you can produce a truly excellent espresso.


 
Date: 10 Dec 2006 09:56:48
From: Lloyd Parsons
Subject: Re: Vibiemme Domobar versus Gaggia Synchrony...
In article <1165764823.180958.239060@16g2000cwy.googlegroups.com >,
ns.gaga@gmail.com wrote:

> ______________________________________________________________________________
> ___
> I have a bit of a dillemma if you could help me w/...
> I have basically came down to two choices (available via my local
> dealers, anything else is not an option for me), the above mentioned
> Domobar (single) and all-in-one Gaggia Synchrony Digital (or Saeco
> Royal - which seem the same or similar).
> My ultimate goal is to make the best possible home-brewed espresso,
> like in restaurants/caffees - have had the Krups and that was a real
> disappointment.
> Vibiemme seems like the best bet for home use - while it's more work,
> requires good grinding etc. (btw. how much is that essential? i.e w/
> not so much time spent on good coffee preparation would I still be
> getting a decent coffee?). On the other side, automatics provide easy
> and fast coffee - while I'm not sure about the two things - quality of
> the coffee and quality of the machines, have heard about many problems
> w/ electronics and similar?
> btw. price is more less the same - Vibiemme a bit more espensive as I'd
> have to get a good grinder (are Gaggia grinders ok enough?).
> What would you recommend?
> Thanks to all,
> ______________________________________________________________________________
> ___

With a good grinder and espresso machine, coupled with freshly roasted
beans, you can produce a cup better than many coffee shops and certainly
much better than most restaurants.

In many venues, the espresso machine is considered an accessory to the
grinder. Yes, the grinder is the most important part of producing good
to excellent espresso.

For that reason, the super autos all fall apart, or at least the ones
for the home ket. Their grinders are just not up to the task.

Two days ago, I would have recommended the Gaggia MDF as being more than
adequate, and it is certainly better than the cheaper grinders. But
yesterday I got my Mazzer Super Jolly and produced a cup I've never
experienced before. It was an amazing experience! I had never tasted
an espresso that I really liked, couldn't ever taste the things others
had said were in the cup. But yesterday I did. All because of the
grinder. I think it is more that the MDF just doesn't allow the tuning
of the grind because the steps are too big than anything else.

So with that in mind, I would pick the Vibiemme over the super auto. I
would then look at a very good grinder. Used Super Jolly, like mine, go
for around $250-300 on Ebay and figure a new set of burrs for another
$30 or so.

Or get a Mazzer or Macap new in the $400 range. You may be able to get
your local dealer to do a package deal, most online ones will. Usually
knocking $75-$100 off for a machine/grinder package. At this level,
these are not low gin items, so they should be able to wiggle a bit.

To get the very best results ensure you have a good grinder, good
espresso machine and a source for freshly roasted beans. If you have
those three things, you can produce a truly excellent espresso.