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Date: 26 Feb 2007 11:07:06
From:
Subject: Water PH
Coffee has a PH of 5, and your blood of 7.5. What water PH should be
used to make espresso?
Match the coffee PH 5?
Match blood PH 7.5?
Go neutral with PH 7?
Up PH to 9 to balance coffee?





 
Date: 28 Feb 2007 09:32:44
From:
Subject: Re: Water PH
On Feb 27, 8:02 pm, jim schulman <jim_schul...@ameritech.net > wrote:
> On 26 Feb 2007 16:41:52 -0800, cpaso...@hotmail.com wrote:
>
> >On Feb 26, 3:59 pm, jim schulman <jim_schul...@ameritech.net> wrote:
> >> On 26 Feb 2007 11:07:06 -0800, cpaso...@hotmail.com wrote:
>
> >> The pH per se is unimportant. You get the right level of minerals if
> >> the water pH is around 7, below 6.5 is too pure, above 7.5 is too
> >> calcified.
>
> >I don't get it.
> >Contrex water has disolved solids of 2100 and a PH of 7.
> >Arrow water has disolved solids of 40 and a PH of 7.
> >Ozarka water has DS of 50 and a PH of 5.
> >It does not appear that DS is related to PH.
> >Why is PH unimportant?
>
> The pH of the water at equilibrium is determined by the dissolved
> calcium carbonate. Distilled water absorbs CO2, becomes acidic, and
> registers around 6. Water with around 200 mg/L carbonates (known as
> alkalinity) will register around around 8 pH.
>
> PH measurements of water not at equilibrium can be anything the lab
> wants it to be (within reason), simply by controlling gas absorption.
> The Contrex was probably sparkling during that measure.

Thanx,
I talked to some people today that said water is so neutral that they
would guess it makes no difference as to what the PH is. Without
testing, their guess is that the water will take on the PH of teh
coffee bean in any situation.

I am now on to seeing how disolved solids will change brew time.
Has anyone done any testing to see how many seconds longer a shot will
go if you increase DS?



 
Date: 26 Feb 2007 16:41:52
From:
Subject: Re: Water PH
On Feb 26, 3:59 pm, jim schulman <jim_schul...@ameritech.net > wrote:
> On 26 Feb 2007 11:07:06 -0800, cpaso...@hotmail.com wrote:
>
> >Coffee has a PH of 5, and your blood of 7.5. What water PH should be
> >used to make espresso?
> >Match the coffee PH 5?
> >Match blood PH 7.5?
> >Go neutral with PH 7?
> >Up PH to 9 to balance coffee?
>
> The pH per se is unimportant. You get the right level of minerals if
> the water pH is around 7, below 6.5 is too pure, above 7.5 is too
> calcified.

I don't get it.
Contrex water has disolved solids of 2100 and a PH of 7.
Arrow water has disolved solids of 40 and a PH of 7.
Ozarka water has DS of 50 and a PH of 5.
It does not appear that DS is related to PH.
Why is PH unimportant?



  
Date: 27 Feb 2007 19:02:54
From: jim schulman
Subject: Re: Water PH
On 26 Feb 2007 16:41:52 -0800, cpasoren@hotmail.com wrote:

>On Feb 26, 3:59 pm, jim schulman <jim_schul...@ameritech.net> wrote:
>> On 26 Feb 2007 11:07:06 -0800, cpaso...@hotmail.com wrote:
>>
>> The pH per se is unimportant. You get the right level of minerals if
>> the water pH is around 7, below 6.5 is too pure, above 7.5 is too
>> calcified.
>
>I don't get it.
>Contrex water has disolved solids of 2100 and a PH of 7.
>Arrow water has disolved solids of 40 and a PH of 7.
>Ozarka water has DS of 50 and a PH of 5.
>It does not appear that DS is related to PH.
>Why is PH unimportant?

The pH of the water at equilibrium is determined by the dissolved
calcium carbonate. Distilled water absorbs CO2, becomes acidic, and
registers around 6. Water with around 200 mg/L carbonates (known as
alkalinity) will register around around 8 pH.

PH measurements of water not at equilibrium can be anything the lab
wants it to be (within reason), simply by controlling gas absorption.
The Contrex was probably sparkling during that measure.


   
Date: 27 Feb 2007 18:43:27
From:
Subject: Re: Water PH
On Tue, 27 Feb 2007 19:02:54 -0600, jim schulman
<jim_schulman@ameritech.net > wrote:

>On 26 Feb 2007 16:41:52 -0800, cpasoren@hotmail.com wrote:
>
>>On Feb 26, 3:59 pm, jim schulman <jim_schul...@ameritech.net> wrote:
>>> On 26 Feb 2007 11:07:06 -0800, cpaso...@hotmail.com wrote:
>>>
>>> The pH per se is unimportant. You get the right level of minerals if
>>> the water pH is around 7, below 6.5 is too pure, above 7.5 is too
>>> calcified.
>>
>>I don't get it.
>>Contrex water has disolved solids of 2100 and a PH of 7.
>>Arrow water has disolved solids of 40 and a PH of 7.
>>Ozarka water has DS of 50 and a PH of 5.
>>It does not appear that DS is related to PH.
>>Why is PH unimportant?
>
>The pH of the water at equilibrium is determined by the dissolved
>calcium carbonate. Distilled water absorbs CO2, becomes acidic, and
>registers around 6. Water with around 200 mg/L carbonates (known as
>alkalinity) will register around around 8 pH.
>
>PH measurements of water not at equilibrium can be anything the lab
>wants it to be (within reason), simply by controlling gas absorption.
>The Contrex was probably sparkling during that measure.


thanks for another great post: Informative and Informed.






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Date: 26 Feb 2007 14:59:35
From: jim schulman
Subject: Re: Water PH
On 26 Feb 2007 11:07:06 -0800, cpasoren@hotmail.com wrote:

>Coffee has a PH of 5, and your blood of 7.5. What water PH should be
>used to make espresso?
>Match the coffee PH 5?
>Match blood PH 7.5?
>Go neutral with PH 7?
>Up PH to 9 to balance coffee?

The pH per se is unimportant. You get the right level of minerals if
the water pH is around 7, below 6.5 is too pure, above 7.5 is too
calcified.