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Date: 21 Apr 2007 08:23:42
From: Ken
Subject: Water hardness: converter microS/cc to ppm
I am using a Hanna TDS meter to test water hardness; its output is in
parts per million. The test solution is 800 microS/cc (Greek letter "mu").

Does anyone know the conversion factor? How many ppm the 800 microS/cc
would convert to?

Thanks
Ken K




 
Date: 21 Apr 2007 15:33:35
From: Ken
Subject: Re: Water hardness: converter microS/cc to ppm
Ken said the following on 4/21/2007 8:23 AM:
> I am using a Hanna TDS meter to test water hardness; its output is in
> parts per million. The test solution is 800 microS/cc (Greek letter "mu").
>
> Does anyone know the conversion factor? How many ppm the 800 microS/cc
> would convert to?
>
> Thanks
> Ken K
Jim S wrote:

Really tough conversion: micrograms/cc == 800 ppm.

Engineers sometimes get religion. They then form a new sect of the
Metric Church and declare holy war on all the others. PPM, mg/L, and
mu-g/cc are all ways of saying the same thing. If someone gives you a
long gibbesish sermon on why it's unscientific (rhymes with unholy) to
use one or the other, you've run into a metric church sectarian.


  
Date: 21 Apr 2007 15:36:13
From: Ken
Subject: Re: Water hardness: converter microS/cc to ppm
Ken said the following on 4/21/2007 3:33 PM:
> Ken said the following on 4/21/2007 8:23 AM:
>> I am using a Hanna TDS meter to test water hardness; its output is in
>> parts per million. The test solution is 800 microS/cc (Greek letter
>> "mu").
>>
>> Does anyone know the conversion factor? How many ppm the 800
>> microS/cc would convert to?
>>
>> Thanks
>> Ken K
> Jim S wrote:
>
> Really tough conversion: micrograms/cc == 800 ppm.
>
> Engineers sometimes get religion. They then form a new sect of the
> Metric Church and declare holy war on all the others. PPM, mg/L, and
> mu-g/cc are all ways of saying the same thing. If someone gives you a
> long gibbesish sermon on why it's unscientific (rhymes with unholy) to
> use one or the other, you've run into a metric church sectarian.
Jim,

The Hanna test liquid is 800 microS per cc, so how does that convert to
ppm? When I use the meter and the 800 microS/cc test fluid, the meter
registers 37 ppm.

This is beooming confusing...


   
Date: 22 Apr 2007 11:17:21
From: Ken
Subject: Re: Water hardness: converter microS/cc to ppm
Ken said the following on 4/21/2007 3:36 PM:
> Ken said the following on 4/21/2007 3:33 PM:
>> Ken said the following on 4/21/2007 8:23 AM:
>>> I am using a Hanna TDS meter to test water hardness; its output is in
>>> parts per million. The test solution is 800 microS/cc (Greek letter
>>> "mu").
>>>
>>> Does anyone know the conversion factor? How many ppm the 800
>>> microS/cc would convert to?
>>>
>>> Thanks
>>> Ken K
>> Jim S wrote:
>>
>> Really tough conversion: micrograms/cc == 800 ppm.
>>
>> Engineers sometimes get religion. They then form a new sect of the
>> Metric Church and declare holy war on all the others. PPM, mg/L, and
>> mu-g/cc are all ways of saying the same thing. If someone gives you a
>> long gibbesish sermon on why it's unscientific (rhymes with unholy) to
>> use one or the other, you've run into a metric church sectarian.
> Jim,
>
> The Hanna test liquid is 800 microS per cc, so how does that convert to
> ppm? When I use the meter and the 800 microS/cc test fluid, the meter
> registers 37 ppm.
>
> This is beooming confusing...
Mistake. The standard fluid is 84 microS/cc (not 800), which
corresponds to 42 ppm (http://www.biophysica.com/conductivity.htm), so
the meter was fairly close when it measured 37 ppm for calibration.


    
Date: 22 Apr 2007 15:08:57
From: Johnny
Subject: Re: Water hardness: converter microS/cc to ppm

"Ken" <ken@comcast.net > wrote in message
news:u42dnQiNZNfOO7bbnZ2dnUVZ_sHinZ2d@comcast.com...
> Ken said the following on 4/21/2007 3:36 PM:
> > Ken said the following on 4/21/2007 3:33 PM:
> >> Ken said the following on 4/21/2007 8:23 AM:
> >>> I am using a Hanna TDS meter to test water hardness; its output is in
> >>> parts per million. The test solution is 800 microS/cc (Greek letter
> >>> "mu").
> >>>
> >>> Does anyone know the conversion factor? How many ppm the 800
> >>> microS/cc would convert to?
> >>>
> >>> Thanks
> >>> Ken K
> >> Jim S wrote:
> >>
> >> Really tough conversion: micrograms/cc == 800 ppm.
> >>
> >> Engineers sometimes get religion. They then form a new sect of the
> >> Metric Church and declare holy war on all the others. PPM, mg/L, and
> >> mu-g/cc are all ways of saying the same thing. If someone gives you a
> >> long gibbesish sermon on why it's unscientific (rhymes with unholy) to
> >> use one or the other, you've run into a metric church sectarian.
> > Jim,
> >
> > The Hanna test liquid is 800 microS per cc, so how does that convert to
> > ppm? When I use the meter and the 800 microS/cc test fluid, the meter
> > registers 37 ppm.
> >
> > This is beooming confusing...
> Mistake. The standard fluid is 84 microS/cc (not 800), which
> corresponds to 42 ppm (http://www.biophysica.com/conductivity.htm), so
> the meter was fairly close when it measured 37 ppm for calibration.
yes. very confusing to others reading this thread
repeated mistake : microS/cc
should be: microS/cm




     
Date: 23 Apr 2007 20:23:13
From: Ken
Subject: Re: Water hardness: converter microS/cc to ppm
Johnny wrote:
> "Ken" <ken@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:u42dnQiNZNfOO7bbnZ2dnUVZ_sHinZ2d@comcast.com...
>> Ken said the following on 4/21/2007 3:36 PM:
>>> Ken said the following on 4/21/2007 3:33 PM:
>>>> Ken said the following on 4/21/2007 8:23 AM:
>>>>> I am using a Hanna TDS meter to test water hardness; its output is in
>>>>> parts per million. The test solution is 800 microS/cc (Greek letter
>>>>> "mu").
>>>>>
>>>>> Does anyone know the conversion factor? How many ppm the 800
>>>>> microS/cc would convert to?
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks
>>>>> Ken K
>>>> Jim S wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Really tough conversion: micrograms/cc == 800 ppm.
>>>>
>>>> Engineers sometimes get religion. They then form a new sect of the
>>>> Metric Church and declare holy war on all the others. PPM, mg/L, and
>>>> mu-g/cc are all ways of saying the same thing. If someone gives you a
>>>> long gibbesish sermon on why it's unscientific (rhymes with unholy) to
>>>> use one or the other, you've run into a metric church sectarian.
>>> Jim,
>>>
>>> The Hanna test liquid is 800 microS per cc, so how does that convert to
>>> ppm? When I use the meter and the 800 microS/cc test fluid, the meter
>>> registers 37 ppm.
>>>
>>> This is beooming confusing...
>> Mistake. The standard fluid is 84 microS/cc (not 800), which
>> corresponds to 42 ppm (http://www.biophysica.com/conductivity.htm), so
>> the meter was fairly close when it measured 37 ppm for calibration.
> yes. very confusing to others reading this thread
> repeated mistake : microS/cc
> should be: microS/cm
>
>
My apologies...


 
Date: 21 Apr 2007 12:55:39
From: Felix
Subject: Re: Water hardness: converter microS/cc to ppm
Barry Jarrett (rileys-coffee.com) writes:
> roughly:
>
> 1 ppm = 1.5 microSiemen
>
> google is your friend:
> http://www.sensorex.com/support/education/conductivity_education.html

All true ... the trick in this case is to use "microsiemen" instead of
its abbreviation, e.g. search for "tds ppm microsiemen".

Re: "roughly." The conversion factor depends on the solution's
composition, so this "mixed salts" formula is only an approximation.
Hanna provides another formula for CaCO3 on page 3 of this document:
http://www.hannacan.com/Literature/Industriel-controllers.pdf

If Ken's test solution is a calibration product, I'd use the NaCl
formula. There's a bunch in a table here:
http://www.cannonwater.com/Products/standards.html


Felix



 
Date: 21 Apr 2007 19:07:57
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: Water hardness: converter microS/cc to ppm

roughly:

1 ppm = 1.5 microSiemen


google is your friend:
http://www.sensorex.com/support/education/conductivity_education.html




  
Date: 21 Apr 2007 12:55:26
From: Ken
Subject: Re: Water hardness: converter microS/cc to ppm
Excellent. Thanks

Barry Jarrett said the following on 4/21/2007 12:07 PM:
> roughly:
>
> 1 ppm = 1.5 microSiemen
>
>
> google is your friend:
> http://www.sensorex.com/support/education/conductivity_education.html
>
>