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Date: 30 Nov 2006 21:58:51
From: Ton
Subject: What would be the best way to judge a roast for espresso ?
Of course tasting it, but....
Since I started roasting myself yesterday, I am a little off the scent,
at least with espresso.
This week I took the plunge and bought an i-Roast 2, which arrived
yesterday. Being curious of course, I started as soon as possible with
roasting a batch of Panama beans with one of the preset profiles (no.
2), after first cleaning/washing the pot etc. This morning I brewed
some coffee with my Bodum FP and it tasted not bad at all. Then this
morning I roasted some more Panama with the same profile and after a few
hours I tried to make some espresso with my Silvia. I ground the beans
in my Mazzer Mini, but apparently it was much too coarse, probably also
because I had just cleaned the Mazzer taking it apart. The pour lasted
only 10 seconds and was undrinkable. After setting 2 clicks finer it was
still too coarse and undrinkable. Anyhow I will wait until tomorrow
before trying again, letting the beans rest one night.
Now my question: What would be the best sequence to get a good espresso
? I think it is first trying to find the right setting for my Mazzer,
but how much influence has the brewing temnperature ? I PID'ed my Silvia
and have the Fuji PID at 111*C (232*F) and almost always had rather good
results with the roasted Panama beans that I bought until now. Should I
keep that setting for the time being and only play with the grind
fineness and after that (when I get a double in about 25 seconds, with
the same amount and tamp I always use) with the roast profile ?




 
Date: 30 Nov 2006 15:30:11
From: Randy G.
Subject: Re: What would be the best way to judge a roast for espresso ?
Ton <thisisafakeforspam@hotmail.com > wrote:


Try looking at my review of the iRoast2. I have two of my favorite
profiles listed there. Try those. They both worked fairly well for
espresso.



  
Date: 01 Dec 2006 13:59:07
From: Ton
Subject: Re: What would be the best way to judge a roast for espresso ?
Randy G. wrote:

> Try looking at my review of the iRoast2. I have two of my favorite
> profiles listed there. Try those. They both worked fairly well for
> espresso.

> V
> Randy "it's right there V " G.
> http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com


Thanks for the response.
This morning, although maybe a little bit too soon (about 14 hours after
roasting) I made 2 single shots and 2 cappas with the approximate right
grind and it tasted rather good already. My wife was very happy too with
the cappa.
Randy, I already read your review. I will try your profiles this
afternoon. However the highest temp you use is 410*F at the end, whereas
I thought that for an espresso you have to go to 450*F or higher. Of
course I will be wrong, being a complete noob with roasting.
I think I was also able to hear the 1st crack yesterday, using your
advice to listen close to the chaff collector. It started after about
6.45 minutes (with 4.45 left using Preset 2). Could that be right ?
Oh, and I also bought (and received it this morning) Kenneth Davids'
book on Home Roasting. So I will have something to study for the coming
days.


 
Date: 30 Nov 2006 15:07:11
From: Deggy
Subject: Re: What would be the best way to judge a roast for espresso ?

> but how much influence has the brewing temnperature ? I PID'ed my Silvia
> and have the Fuji PID at 111*C (232*F) and almost always had rather good
> results with the roasted Panama beans that I bought until now. Should I
> keep that setting for the time being and only play with the grind
> fineness and after that (when I get a double in about 25 seconds, with
> the same amount and tamp I always use) with the roast profile ?

The temperature of the water will affect the taste of the coffee but
within a few degrees not have too large an effect on the time it takes
you to pull a shot.

You should always roast for flavour, and certainly not to achieve a
shot time. Don't be a slave to roast profiles - sound and smell has
alot to do with it.

So the real variable will be grind and tamp. I certainly find that if
I pull a shot within 24 hours of roasting to a good espresso roast I
always get a gusher. I roast to a full city or so, it depends on the
beans but I almost always roast blends for espresso and save single
origin for the press or vac.

This may well because I believe that with a domestic air-bed roaster
you'll end up with higher moisture content and slightly more oil than
with a longer, professional roast.

And it also depends on the bean type.

Dan