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Date: 13 Dec 2006 20:12:19
From: Ton
Subject: When roasting with my i-Roast2 there is something I don't understand
Little by little I am getting better results with my i-Roast 2. But as I
said, there is something I don't understand. After the 2nd crack has
started, at a certain moment I see oil patches appearing at the beans,
when I look in the roasting chamber, using a torch. A little later I
stop and start cooling. However after the cooling stage and dumping the
beans in a colander, these patches have disappeared and the beans look
rather dry. How can this be explained ?
Ton




 
Date: 14 Dec 2006 06:56:37
From:
Subject: Re: When roasting with my i-Roast2 there is something I don't understand

Ton wrote:
> mandtprice@gmail.com wrote:
>
> >
> > You have ordered you handbasket, haven't you?
> >
> > Matthew
>
>
> I know or at least suspect that this term "handbasket is some kind of
> inside joke. I already saw it a lot of times in other posts. But what
> does it mean ?

as in "where are we going? what do I need this handbasket for?"

At this point on the slippery slope you've already stumbled but think
you have caught your balance and will be fine.

Matthew



 
Date: 14 Dec 2006 06:25:16
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: When roasting with my i-Roast2 there is something I don't understand

Ton wrote:

> Thanks Matthew. So it will be experience in roasting different kind of
> beans to judge the relation between showing of oil and the degee of roast ?

In part the oil is undergoing carmelization, in part carmelization
assumes a nutty flavor. Fruit berry coffee beans containing sucrose
will change to fructose and glucose during the process. Unavoidable,
by in large, since roast temperatures are well above carmelization
reactions - 230F for sucrose and 320-360F for the rest. Roasting for a
glaze at full city, I'm not sure if a cumulative effect of carmel is
occuring as an ongoing process from earlier sugar reactions, or if
other chemicals become as well a part of the end glaze.



 
Date: 13 Dec 2006 16:46:22
From:
Subject: Re: When roasting with my i-Roast2 there is something I don't understand
Craig Andrews wrote:
> "Ton" <thisisafakeforspam@hotmail.com> wrote
> > mandtprice@gmail.com wrote:
> >> You have ordered you handbasket, haven't you?

> > I know or at least suspect that this term "handbasket is some kind of
> > inside joke. I already saw it a lot of times in other posts. But what
> > does it mean ?

> Hi Ton, a hand basket/carry basket you'll NEED figuratively., to carry
> ALL the related coffee paraphernalia you'll be buying!! {:-D

And there was me, a rank newbie here, assuming that he'd need a
handbasket because with those sorts of questions, he's obviously
on the way to hell and had better hurry up along the way ...

John

(Yup, handbasket on the way, along with bottomless PF and sundry
other toys ...)



  
Date: 14 Dec 2006 11:52:55
From: Ton
Subject: Re: When roasting with my i-Roast2 there is something I don't understand
john.sabine@gmail.com wrote:
, he's obviously
> on the way to hell and had better hurry up along the way ...
>
> John
>

OMG... and I thought I was already a little bit in HEAVEN with my home
roasted beans and the shots from my Silvia, compared to those I was used
to get in a restaurant :-(.
Ton


 
Date: 13 Dec 2006 14:15:49
From:
Subject: Re: When roasting with my i-Roast2 there is something I don't understand

Ton wrote:
> mandtprice@gmail.com wrote:
>
>
>
> Thanks Matthew. So it will be experience in roasting different kind of
> beans to judge the relation between showing of oil and the degee of roast ?

Yup. The speed of the roast also figures in to how the oil develops.

You have ordered you handbasket, haven't you?

Matthew



  
Date: 13 Dec 2006 23:40:59
From: Ton
Subject: Re: When roasting with my i-Roast2 there is something I don't understand
mandtprice@gmail.com wrote:

>
> You have ordered you handbasket, haven't you?
>
> Matthew


I know or at least suspect that this term "handbasket is some kind of
inside joke. I already saw it a lot of times in other posts. But what
does it mean ?



   
Date: 13 Dec 2006 18:14:24
From: Craig Andrews
Subject: Re: When roasting with my i-Roast2 there is something I don't understand

"Ton" <thisisafakeforspam@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:45807fda$0$14302$d9cdae7c@reader-1.nedlook.nl...
> mandtprice@gmail.com wrote:
>
>>
>> You have ordered you handbasket, haven't you?
>>
>> Matthew
>
>
> I know or at least suspect that this term "handbasket is some kind of
> inside joke. I already saw it a lot of times in other posts. But what
> does it mean ?
>

Hi Ton, a hand basket/carry basket you'll NEED figuratively., to carry
ALL the related coffee paraphernalia you'll be buying!! {:-D
Craig.



 
Date: 13 Dec 2006 11:18:09
From:
Subject: Re: When roasting with my i-Roast2 there is something I don't understand

Ton wrote:
> Little by little I am getting better results with my i-Roast 2. But as I
> said, there is something I don't understand. After the 2nd crack has
> started, at a certain moment I see oil patches appearing at the beans,
> when I look in the roasting chamber, using a torch. A little later I
> stop and start cooling. However after the cooling stage and dumping the
> beans in a colander, these patches have disappeared and the beans look
> rather dry. How can this be explained ?
> Ton

There are two things that can happen with the oil depending on the bean
and the roast level. A roast terminated with no oil showing can have
oil appear later and one where oil was present either during the roast
or immediately after can see that oil reabsorbed. If you are trying to
get oily beans you will need to push them further.

Matthew



  
Date: 13 Dec 2006 21:16:53
From: Ton
Subject: Re: When roasting with my i-Roast2 there is something I don't understand
mandtprice@gmail.com wrote:

>
> There are two things that can happen with the oil depending on the bean
> and the roast level. A roast terminated with no oil showing can have
> oil appear later and one where oil was present either during the roast
> or immediately after can see that oil reabsorbed. If you are trying to
> get oily beans you will need to push them further.
>
> Matthew


Thanks Matthew. So it will be experience in roasting different kind of
beans to judge the relation between showing of oil and the degee of roast ?