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Date: 24 Sep 2006 04:45:01
From: Kruger Kid
Subject: Where to get Tartaric Acid
Where can you get Tartaric acid to clean a espresso machine.

I understand this is what is recommended for aluminum boilers. Also
the ingredient in the Gaggia Descaler.

Kruger.




 
Date: 26 Sep 2006 12:30:50
From: daveb
Subject: Re: Where to get Tartaric Acid
don't worry -- don't use it.

d

J=E9r=E9my JUST wrote:
> Le Sun, 24 Sep 2006 04:45:01 GMT,
> Kruger Kid <kkofvirgo@yahoo.com> a =E9crit :
>
> > Where can you get Tartaric acid to clean a espresso machine.
> > I understand this is what is recommended for aluminum boilers.
>
> At what concentration do you use it?
>=20
> --=20
> J=E9r=E9my JUST <jeremy_just@netcourrier.com>



 
Date: 24 Sep 2006 23:52:18
From: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?J=E9r=E9my?= JUST
Subject: Re: Where to get Tartaric Acid
Le Sun, 24 Sep 2006 20:43:05 GMT,
Kruger Kid <kkofvirgo@yahoo.com > a écrit :

> My superket has Cream of Tarter. Which is Poassium tartrate. Can
> this be subsituted for Tartaric acid?

No, the tartrate form is not acidic.


--
Jérémy JUST <jeremy_just@netcourrier.com >


  
Date: 24 Sep 2006 19:50:41
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Where to get Tartaric Acid
It must be somewhat acidic - it's used as the acid half of certain baking
powders (with sodium bicarbonate supplying the base). Whether it's as acidic
as the pure tartaric acid I dunno - I suppose it's less.


"Jérémy JUST" <jeremy_just@netcourrier.com > wrote in message
news:20060924235218.48ba668a@norbert.jejust.info...
> Le Sun, 24 Sep 2006 20:43:05 GMT,
> Kruger Kid <kkofvirgo@yahoo.com> a écrit :
>
>> My superket has Cream of Tarter. Which is Poassium tartrate. Can
>> this be subsituted for Tartaric acid?
>
> No, the tartrate form is not acidic.
>
>
> --
> Jérémy JUST <jeremy_just@netcourrier.com>




 
Date: 24 Sep 2006 17:02:31
From: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?J=E9r=E9my?= JUST
Subject: Re: Where to get Tartaric Acid
Le Sun, 24 Sep 2006 04:45:01 GMT,
Kruger Kid <kkofvirgo@yahoo.com > a écrit :

> Where can you get Tartaric acid to clean a espresso machine.
> I understand this is what is recommended for aluminum boilers.

At what concentration do you use it?

--
Jérémy JUST <jeremy_just@netcourrier.com >


 
Date: 24 Sep 2006 07:06:30
From: Mario
Subject: Re: Where to get Tartaric Acid
Try a winemaking supply shop

"Kruger Kid" <kkofvirgo@yahoo.com > wrote in message
news:523ch25vcrjmr6vh13d9fteeqnpig99752@4ax.com...
> Where can you get Tartaric acid to clean a espresso machine.
>
> I understand this is what is recommended for aluminum boilers. Also
> the ingredient in the Gaggia Descaler.
>
> Kruger.




 
Date: 24 Sep 2006 04:40:40
From: daveb
Subject: Re: Where to get cleaner
Cleancaf --

Urnex.com

Kruger Kid wrote:
> Where can you get Tartaric acid to clean a espresso machine.
>
> I understand this is what is recommended for aluminum boilers. Also
> the ingredient in the Gaggia Descaler.
>
> Kruger.



 
Date: 24 Sep 2006 05:08:46
From: Coffee for Connoisseurs
Subject: Re: Where to get Tartaric Acid
Local superket cooking section, along with baking powder etc.


--
Alan

alanfrew@coffeeco.com.au
www.coffeeco.com.au





  
Date: 24 Sep 2006 20:43:05
From: Kruger Kid
Subject: Re: Where to get Tartaric Acid
On Sun, 24 Sep 2006 05:08:46 GMT, "Coffee for Connoisseurs"
<alanfrew@coffeeco.com.au > wrote:

>Local superket cooking section, along with baking powder etc.

My superket has Cream of Tarter. Which is Poassium tartrate. Can
this be subsituted for Tartaric acid?

I do see Tartaric Acid in wine making stores. About $7.00 for 1/2 lb.
Thanks io

My understanding is to use 30g Tartaric acid per liter of water.

Cleancaf is citric based.

I have seen a few sources recommending using Tartaric Acid instead of
Cleancaf. Also the Gaggia descaler is Tartaric Acid.

Kruger




   
Date: 24 Sep 2006 18:09:34
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Where to get Tartaric Acid
Technically cream of tartar is the potassium salt of tartaric acid but in
common usage they are used interchangeably. Whether it would be equally
effective for descaling I dunno since I always use citric.


"Kruger Kid" <kkofvirgo@yahoo.com > wrote in message
news:9tpdh299gph0ggkq2faa76315o99phvebl@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 24 Sep 2006 05:08:46 GMT, "Coffee for Connoisseurs"
> <alanfrew@coffeeco.com.au> wrote:
>
>>Local superket cooking section, along with baking powder etc.
>
> My superket has Cream of Tarter. Which is Poassium tartrate. Can
> this be subsituted for Tartaric acid?
>
> I do see Tartaric Acid in wine making stores. About $7.00 for 1/2 lb.
> Thanks io
>
> My understanding is to use 30g Tartaric acid per liter of water.
>
> Cleancaf is citric based.
>
> I have seen a few sources recommending using Tartaric Acid instead of
> Cleancaf. Also the Gaggia descaler is Tartaric Acid.
>
> Kruger
>
>




    
Date: 04 Oct 2006 21:46:35
From: Bolo
Subject: Re: Where to get Tartaric Acid
Jack Denver wrote:
> Technically cream of tartar is the potassium salt of tartaric acid but in
> common usage they are used interchangeably. Whether it would be equally
> effective for descaling I dunno since I always use citric.
>
>
> "Kruger Kid" <kkofvirgo@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:9tpdh299gph0ggkq2faa76315o99phvebl@4ax.com...
>> On Sun, 24 Sep 2006 05:08:46 GMT, "Coffee for Connoisseurs"
>> <alanfrew@coffeeco.com.au> wrote:
>>
>>> Local superket cooking section, along with baking powder etc.
>> My superket has Cream of Tarter. Which is Poassium tartrate. Can
>> this be subsituted for Tartaric acid?
>>
>> I do see Tartaric Acid in wine making stores. About $7.00 for 1/2 lb.
>> Thanks io
>>
>> My understanding is to use 30g Tartaric acid per liter of water.
>>
>> Cleancaf is citric based.
>>
>> I have seen a few sources recommending using Tartaric Acid instead of
>> Cleancaf. Also the Gaggia descaler is Tartaric Acid.
>>
>> Kruger
>>
>>
>
>

Tartaric acid had two acidic groups in it, if cream of tartar is the
monopotassium salt, then it is very weakly acidic. And, I suspect, a
poor descaling agent...


  
Date: 24 Sep 2006 04:07:55
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Where to get Tartaric Acid
In the US, it's called "cream of tartar". However, you'll pay dearly for it
by the ounce.

Is tartaric really superior to citric for alu.?



"Coffee for Connoisseurs" <alanfrew@coffeeco.com.au > wrote in message
news:ypoRg.35069$rP1.23372@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
> Local superket cooking section, along with baking powder etc.
>
>
> --
> Alan
>
> alanfrew@coffeeco.com.au
> www.coffeeco.com.au
>
>
>