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Date: 10 Dec 2006 13:42:26
From: jodanna
Subject: Would you pull this
I'm a Starbucks addict and though I'm a bit embarrassed to admit it I
feel it fair to express the extent of my coffee knowledge so that any
suggestions can be geared to my level of experience. I realize that SB
is not known for superb espresso but I've tried a couple shots from a
very reputable bean shop and the stuff was syrupy and heavy headed. But
hell it was bitter and had such a pungent flavor that I couldn't choke
it down.

Now SB has become too expensive lately and I'm thinking of buying my
own machine. I've researched the various sites, WLL CoffeeGeek ...,
and I'm up to my eye balls in too much information with not enough room
in my head in which to fill. I just want a nice machine that is
painlessly easy and very well made. My limits are time, $1500 limit
and perhaps a limited taste for pungent syrup. I love good coffee and
when I can't make it to my SB's I use my little french press. I also
have a stove top Italian frothier that was a waste of $50 bucks and
some little aero-wand that seems would make a better vibrator than its
intended froth purpose. Microfoam it does not make - large blow bubbles
it does a fine job at. Lastly, my HH at most drinks maybe 3-4 cups a
day.

All suggestions welcome.jodan





 
Date: 10 Dec 2006 14:42:55
From: Randy G.
Subject: Re: Would you pull this
"jodanna" <freshair1986@yahoo.com > wrote:

> I'm a Starbucks addict and though I'm a bit embarrassed to admit it I
>feel it fair to express the extent of my coffee knowledge so that any
>suggestions can be geared to my level of experience. I realize that SB
>is not known for superb espresso...
>
To be accurate, they are not known for their espresso at all. Have you
had their espresso straight? Just curious to hear haw it compared to
the "tincture of coffee" you sampled at the other shop.

>Now SB has become too expensive lately...
>
Lately....?

>... and I'm thinking of buying my
>own machine. I've researched the various sites, WLL CoffeeGeek ...,
>and I'm up to my eye balls in too much information with not enough room
>in my head in which to fill. I just want a nice machine that is
>painlessly easy and very well made.
>
Compared to neurosurgery, espresso IS painlessly easy (literally and
figuratively). If you are talking about having the ability to just
push a button and get an espresso in a cup (like the counter-monkeys
now do at *$$) then you want a superauto.

>My limits are time, $1500 limit
>
That's about the starting point for the better superautos. I would
stay away from the bargain priced machines in this range. be aware
that as far as service these are not user friendly and nearly always
have to go back to the shop for all but the most minor of problems. If
you go this route I highly suggest:

1) get one that can be serviced locally by an authorized center that
knows what they are doing
2) If you can, go there and get the model you see the least of piled
up waiting for service
3) Use a credit card that extends the warranty to purchase it.
4) Go to http://www.cofeegeek.com and read the user reviews.
5) have a source of fresh, quality coffee lined up (and when I say
fresh, I mean coffee that has been roasted LESS than two weeks ago.
Not bagged two weeks ago, not delivered two weeks ago, but roasted two
weeks ago. "Best if used by... means NOTHING except that the coffee is
already stale.

Otherwise, look for a pod machine and settle for consistently
drinkable but mediocre... if you get good pods.


Randy "and read this:" G.
http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com





 
Date: 10 Dec 2006 14:12:31
From: jodanna
Subject: Re: Would you pull this
Hi Robert should have written I have the mini grinder. Rarely use it
because i don't notice a huge dif from the preground that i get from my
bean shop. I've been looking at the La Spaziale Vivaldi II - seems
like over kill for me. Also looked at a few Super Autos.




Robert Harmon wrote:
> "jodanna" <freshair1986@yahoo.com> wrote in news:1165786946.942851.29070@
> 79g2000cws.googlegroups.com:
>
> > I'm a Starbucks addict and though I'm a bit embarrassed to admit it I
> > feel it fair to express the extent of my coffee knowledge so that any
> > suggestions can be geared to my level of experience. I realize that SB
> > is not known for superb espresso but I've tried a couple shots from a
> > very reputable bean shop and the stuff was syrupy and heavy headed. But
> > hell it was bitter and had such a pungent flavor that I couldn't choke
> > it down.
> >
> > Now SB has become too expensive lately and I'm thinking of buying my
> > own machine. I've researched the various sites, WLL CoffeeGeek ...,
> > and I'm up to my eye balls in too much information with not enough room
> > in my head in which to fill. I just want a nice machine that is
> > painlessly easy and very well made. My limits are time, $1500 limit
> > and perhaps a limited taste for pungent syrup. I love good coffee and
> > when I can't make it to my SB's I use my little french press. I also
> > have a stove top Italian frothier that was a waste of $50 bucks and
> > some little aero-wand that seems would make a better vibrator than its
> > intended froth purpose. Microfoam it does not make - large blow bubbles
> > it does a fine job at. Lastly, my HH at most drinks maybe 3-4 cups a
> > day.
> >
> > All suggestions welcome.jodan
> >
> >
>
> In that price range you'll find many options; from the Gaggia line of
> consumer machines to the pricier prosumer Expobars. But I'd suggest taking
> this in reverse order than most would take - buy a VERY good commercial
> grinder first ($300 - $500). This should still leave you with 2/3 of your
> budget intact which will get you a very nice prosumer machine. If it were
> me I'd make the Nuovo Simonelli Oscar the starting point of my search, from
> both price & quality perspectives.
>
> As you gain experience with whatever machines you decide on you'll be
> bitten by the upgrade bug. It happens to us all, but by getting a top
> quality grinder you'll never need to upgrade it. The espresso machine is
> another story - the Gaggia/Silvia owners want heat exchangers, HX owners
> want double boilers, the dbl boiler owners want perfectly restored vintage
> classic machines, etc., etc., ad nauseam.
>
> Whatever you decide on keep us posted. We're all bean & gear heads here,
> and we love gossiping about our hobby.
>
> Robert (Pssst. Did you hear the one about...) Harmon
> --
> http://tinyurl.com/pou2y
> http://tinyurl.com/fkd6r
> Remove "Z" to reply via email.



 
Date: 10 Dec 2006 23:04:15
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: Re: Would you pull this
"jodanna" <freshair1986@yahoo.com > wrote in news:1165786946.942851.29070@
79g2000cws.googlegroups.com:

> I'm a Starbucks addict and though I'm a bit embarrassed to admit it I
> feel it fair to express the extent of my coffee knowledge so that any
> suggestions can be geared to my level of experience. I realize that SB
> is not known for superb espresso but I've tried a couple shots from a
> very reputable bean shop and the stuff was syrupy and heavy headed. But
> hell it was bitter and had such a pungent flavor that I couldn't choke
> it down.
>
> Now SB has become too expensive lately and I'm thinking of buying my
> own machine. I've researched the various sites, WLL CoffeeGeek ...,
> and I'm up to my eye balls in too much information with not enough room
> in my head in which to fill. I just want a nice machine that is
> painlessly easy and very well made. My limits are time, $1500 limit
> and perhaps a limited taste for pungent syrup. I love good coffee and
> when I can't make it to my SB's I use my little french press. I also
> have a stove top Italian frothier that was a waste of $50 bucks and
> some little aero-wand that seems would make a better vibrator than its
> intended froth purpose. Microfoam it does not make - large blow bubbles
> it does a fine job at. Lastly, my HH at most drinks maybe 3-4 cups a
> day.
>
> All suggestions welcome.jodan
>
>

In that price range you'll find many options; from the Gaggia line of
consumer machines to the pricier prosumer Expobars. But I'd suggest taking
this in reverse order than most would take - buy a VERY good commercial
grinder first ($300 - $500). This should still leave you with 2/3 of your
budget intact which will get you a very nice prosumer machine. If it were
me I'd make the Nuovo Simonelli Oscar the starting point of my search, from
both price & quality perspectives.

As you gain experience with whatever machines you decide on you'll be
bitten by the upgrade bug. It happens to us all, but by getting a top
quality grinder you'll never need to upgrade it. The espresso machine is
another story - the Gaggia/Silvia owners want heat exchangers, HX owners
want double boilers, the dbl boiler owners want perfectly restored vintage
classic machines, etc., etc., ad nauseam.

Whatever you decide on keep us posted. We're all bean & gear heads here,
and we love gossiping about our hobby.

Robert (Pssst. Did you hear the one about...) Harmon
--
http://tinyurl.com/pou2y
http://tinyurl.com/fkd6r
Remove "Z" to reply via email.