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Date: 05 May 2007 06:59:03
From: Jim in NJ
Subject: Z&D Roaster Volts
I'd like to know what variac settings people are using for the Z&D
roaster.
I have the "2nd gen" model which was recently obsoleted. Their 3rd
gen apparently has "more watts and better glass".

I've been roasting coffeebeandirect's mocha java and 6 bean espresso
at 21 minutes (which includes the 5 min cool down cycle; 16heat +
5cool). This yields an oil free darkish roast. I suspect my longish
roast times are baking off too many complexities.

I guess I need an idea of how far the Z&D can be pushed before
entering the damage zone.
Any ideas would be greatly appeciated.
Jim

BTW, equipments are Silvia(with TC monitor)/Rocky and Aeropress for
extractions.





 
Date: 10 May 2007 11:00:16
From: Jim in NJ
Subject: Re: Z&D Roaster Volts
On May 8, 6:08 pm, DavidMLewis <DavidMLe...@mac.com > wrote:
> On May 5, 6:59 am, Jim in NJ <commbo...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > I guess I need an idea of how far the Z&D can be pushed before
> > entering the damage zone.
> > Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
>
> I think the reason that no one has responded is that no one wants to
> be responsible for frying your roaster. The fact that one person has
> done something doesn't mean much since spikes on your power lines, the
> accuracy of your voltmeter, and the particular components that
> happened to land in your roast can all differ. The typical tolerance
> for line voltage when you're designing equipment is +/- 10% from
> nominal, or an upper limit of 132 V, but that's only a guess on my
> part. If I were you I'd call Nesco and ask them.
>
> Best,
> David

Thanks David,
I'll try a separate post with a more general discussion point.
Jim



 
Date: 08 May 2007 15:08:01
From: DavidMLewis
Subject: Re: Z&D Roaster Volts
On May 5, 6:59 am, Jim in NJ <commbo...@yahoo.com > wrote:
> I guess I need an idea of how far the Z&D can be pushed before
> entering the damage zone.
> Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

I think the reason that no one has responded is that no one wants to
be responsible for frying your roaster. The fact that one person has
done something doesn't mean much since spikes on your power lines, the
accuracy of your voltmeter, and the particular components that
happened to land in your roast can all differ. The typical tolerance
for line voltage when you're designing equipment is +/- 10% from
nominal, or an upper limit of 132 V, but that's only a guess on my
part. If I were you I'd call Nesco and ask them.

Best,
David