coffee-forum.net
Promoting coffee discussion.

Main
Date: 25 Apr 2007 22:04:10
From: Scott Sellers
Subject: basic roast profile advice
Greetings all,

Beginning home roaster, drip coffee drinker here. After gaining
some experience with air-popper roasting a few years ago, I
drifted away after my popper decided to bake more than roast.

I recently came across the heatgun / dog bowl (hgdb) method of
home coffee roasting, and have undertaken two 4 oz. batches so
far. Other particulars: $1.95 64oz stainless thriftshop mixing
bowl, $10 Harbor Freight heatgun, wooden spoon for stirring.

My thought has been to start on the high end of heat application
then dial back as I refine. There seems to be BTU's to spare in
this technique. First crack (like popcorn) and second crack
(more brittle and snappy) have been unmistakable, and come
through loud and clear above the noise of the heatgun.

I've been preheating the gun and bowl for one minute, throwing in
the beans, then applying the gun in a circular pattern over
the bean surface continuously, pausing to stir every 5 seconds or
so. I'm hitting first crack around 4 minutes, and then powering
through to second crack at around 6 minutes.

I'm satisfied with the ease of this method, and with the evenness
of the roast. I think I could speed things up with closer
application of the heatgun nozzle. I'm certain I could stretch
things out by lowering the heatgun setting, and/or introducing
more space between nozzle and bean.

In short, there seems to be both ample power and flexibility
built into the hgdb method. I'm digging it. My question is
about the timing: I guess what I'm looking for are
guidelines/rules of thumb as far as roast profiling, preferably
in terms of what I can observe while roasting: color, aroma,
first and second crack, steam, smoke etc. across time

My feeling is that I should be taking my foot off of the
accelerater here and there. Any basic roast profiling advice or
observations would be appreciated.

cheers,
Scott S

--
Scott Sellers




 
Date: 25 Apr 2007 17:08:58
From: Randy G.
Subject: Re: basic roast profile advice
Scott Sellers <scottsellers@mindspring.com > wrote:

>Greetings all,
>
>
>I recently came across the heatgun / dog bowl (hgdb) method of
>home coffee roasting, and have undertaken two 4 oz. batches so
>far. Other particulars: $1.95 64oz stainless thriftshop mixing
>bowl, $10 Harbor Freight heatgun, wooden spoon for stirring.
>[major snip]
>My feeling is that I should be taking my foot off of the
>accelerater here and there. Any basic roast profiling advice or
>observations would be appreciated.
>
>
From my own home-roasting experience here are some BASIC guidelines
and thoughts based on what I have learned-

To begin with, there is no one answer when it comes to home roasting.
This is because taste is subjective, and if you like brewing coffee
with un-roasted green beans or prefer those blackened to a briquette
roast (or anything in between), then that is fine.

IMO, the roasts you are doing are too fast. They tend to make for a
bright, high-acid taste that I personally do not like (and to repeat,
this is a subjective matter). One of the big things I found when
switching from the air roasters (Precision and Gourmet) to the Hottop,
the coffee became more balanced in the cup with a smoother over all
taste.

On the other end of the spectrum, you can stretch the roast out too
long. When I switched from the original Hottop that gave a 19 to 22
minute roast (or even a bit longer at times) to the new programmable
model that can do 250-300 grams in about 15-16 minutes or so was that
there was a deeper richer taste, still well balanced but with more
flavor.

So how long is long enough? Try to shoot (not a heat-gun pun for fun)
for at least nine minutes but not more than about 16-17 minutes. 13 to
15 is a decent range. Try to start slower which gives the beans time
to lose moisture and gain heat evenly throughout as they lose their
moisture. You are not trying to sear the outside like meat before
'cooking' them.

TIPS:

- Get a thermometer (digital would be nice) that can place a probe IN
the mass of beans so you can monitor the roast temperature. Roasting
"TO" a temperature is only part of the equation- how you get there is
also critical. These do not have to be expensive. Try this one:
http://www.web-tronics.com/digtherwkpro.html
If you order $50 or more from them, check this:
http://www.web-tronics.com/freedmmoffer.html
Try to place the probe so it reads the BEAN temperature and not the
output of the heat gun.

-Do not let the beans lose temperature at any time in the roast. Bring
the temp up slow or fast, or hold it steady, but never let them cool
off. There are times in the roast when the beans become exothermic-
heat is created through chemical processes in the beans and while you
lessen the amount of heat being applied to the beans by the gun, the
temperature of the beans will increase (or stay steady). This is where
the thermometer becomes a valuable tool.

-Take a look at the temperature profiles I have posted in my Hottop
review to get an idea of what I am trying to accomplish. These might
help you develop more feel and control over what is going on as well
as experience the difference in flavor that a longer roast creates.
You might not like the taste, but it's worth a shot.



Randy "BANG BANG! You're roasted!" G.
http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com







  
Date: 26 Apr 2007 05:46:27
From: Scott Sellers
Subject: Re: basic roast profile advice
Randy G <frcn@DESPAMMOcncnet.com >:
>Scott Sellers <scottsellers@mindspring.com> wrote:

>>Greetings all,
>>
>>
>>I recently came across the heatgun / dog bowl (hgdb) method of
>>home coffee roasting, and have undertaken two 4 oz. batches so
>>far. Other particulars: $1.95 64oz stainless thriftshop mixing
>>bowl, $10 Harbor Freight heatgun, wooden spoon for stirring.
>>[major snip]
>>My feeling is that I should be taking my foot off of the
>>accelerater here and there. Any basic roast profiling advice or
>>observations would be appreciated.
>>
>>
>From my own home-roasting experience here are some BASIC
>guidelines and thoughts based on what I have learned-

>To begin with, there is no one answer when it comes to home
>roasting. This is because taste is subjective, and if you like
>brewing coffee with un-roasted green beans or prefer those
>blackened to a briquette roast (or anything in between), then
>that is fine.

>IMO, the roasts you are doing are too fast. They tend to make
>for a bright, high-acid taste that I personally do not like (and
>to repeat, this is a subjective matter). One of the big things I
>found when switching from the air roasters (Precision and
>Gourmet) to the Hottop, the coffee became more balanced in the
>cup with a smoother over all taste.

Interesting. One of my roasts was Nicaragua FTO Lozahoren
(Dipilto) from Sweet Marias. IIRC, it's noted to be somewhat
acidic, but I'm finding it kinda sour at City+ in around 5
minutes. I think I'll roast up another batch tomorrow, shooting
for a longer profile for comparison.

>On the other end of the spectrum, you can stretch the roast out
>too long. When I switched from the original Hottop that gave a
>19 to 22 minute roast (or even a bit longer at times) to the new
>programmable model that can do 250-300 grams in about 15-16
>minutes or so was that there was a deeper richer taste, still
>well balanced but with more flavor.

>So how long is long enough? Try to shoot (not a heat-gun pun for
>fun) for at least nine minutes but not more than about 16-17
>minutes. 13 to 15 is a decent range. Try to start slower which
>gives the beans time to lose moisture and gain heat evenly
>throughout as they lose their moisture. You are not trying to
>sear the outside like meat before 'cooking' them.

>TIPS:

>- Get a thermometer (digital would be nice) that can place a
>probe IN the mass of beans so you can monitor the roast
>temperature. Roasting "TO" a temperature is only part of the
>equation- how you get there is also critical. These do not have
>to be expensive. Try this one:
>http://www.web-tronics.com/digtherwkpro.html If you order $50 or
>more from them, check this:
>http://www.web-tronics.com/freedmmoffer.html Try to place the
>probe so it reads the BEAN temperature and not the output of the
>heat gun.

>-Do not let the beans lose temperature at any time in the roast.
>Bring the temp up slow or fast, or hold it steady, but never let
>them cool off. There are times in the roast when the beans
>become exothermic- heat is created through chemical processes in
>the beans and while you lessen the amount of heat being applied
>to the beans by the gun, the temperature of the beans will
>increase (or stay steady). This is where the thermometer becomes
>a valuable tool.

>-Take a look at the temperature profiles I have posted in my
>Hottop review to get an idea of what I am trying to accomplish.
>These might help you develop more feel and control over what is
>going on as well as experience the difference in flavor that a
>longer roast creates. You might not like the taste, but it's
>worth a shot.

I'll check it out. So much cool stuff to learn and do. As a
point of reference, I homebrew, and can appreciate specialized
knowledge and the difference it can make in these complex
processes. Much thanks, Randy.

cheers,
Scott S

--
Scott Sellers


   
Date: 27 Apr 2007 07:22:37
From: john
Subject: Re: basic roast profile advice
Scott Sellers wrote:
> Randy G <frcn@DESPAMMOcncnet.com>:
>> Scott Sellers <scottsellers@mindspring.com> wrote:
>
>>> Greetings all,
>>>
>>>
>>> I recently came across the heatgun / dog bowl (hgdb) method of
>>> home coffee roasting, and have undertaken two 4 oz. batches so
>>> far. Other particulars: $1.95 64oz stainless thriftshop mixing
>>> bowl, $10 Harbor Freight heatgun, wooden spoon for stirring.
>>> [major snip]
>>> My feeling is that I should be taking my foot off of the
>>> accelerater here and there. Any basic roast profiling advice or
>>> observations would be appreciated.
>>>
>>>
>>From my own home-roasting experience here are some BASIC
>> guidelines and thoughts based on what I have learned-
>
>> To begin with, there is no one answer when it comes to home
>> roasting. This is because taste is subjective, and if you like
>> brewing coffee with un-roasted green beans or prefer those
>> blackened to a briquette roast (or anything in between), then
>> that is fine.
>
>> IMO, the roasts you are doing are too fast. They tend to make
>> for a bright, high-acid taste that I personally do not like (and
>> to repeat, this is a subjective matter). One of the big things I
>> found when switching from the air roasters (Precision and
>> Gourmet) to the Hottop, the coffee became more balanced in the
>> cup with a smoother over all taste.
>
> Interesting. One of my roasts was Nicaragua FTO Lozahoren
> (Dipilto) from Sweet Marias. IIRC, it's noted to be somewhat
> acidic, but I'm finding it kinda sour at City+ in around 5
> minutes. I think I'll roast up another batch tomorrow, shooting
> for a longer profile for comparison.
>
>> On the other end of the spectrum, you can stretch the roast out
>> too long. When I switched from the original Hottop that gave a
>> 19 to 22 minute roast (or even a bit longer at times) to the new
>> programmable model that can do 250-300 grams in about 15-16
>> minutes or so was that there was a deeper richer taste, still
>> well balanced but with more flavor.
>
>> So how long is long enough? Try to shoot (not a heat-gun pun for
>> fun) for at least nine minutes but not more than about 16-17
>> minutes. 13 to 15 is a decent range. Try to start slower which
>> gives the beans time to lose moisture and gain heat evenly
>> throughout as they lose their moisture. You are not trying to
>> sear the outside like meat before 'cooking' them.
>
>> TIPS:
>
>> - Get a thermometer (digital would be nice) that can place a
>> probe IN the mass of beans so you can monitor the roast
>> temperature. Roasting "TO" a temperature is only part of the
>> equation- how you get there is also critical. These do not have
>> to be expensive. Try this one:
>> http://www.web-tronics.com/digtherwkpro.html If you order $50 or
>> more from them, check this:
>> http://www.web-tronics.com/freedmmoffer.html Try to place the
>> probe so it reads the BEAN temperature and not the output of the
>> heat gun.
>
>> -Do not let the beans lose temperature at any time in the roast.
>> Bring the temp up slow or fast, or hold it steady, but never let
>> them cool off. There are times in the roast when the beans
>> become exothermic- heat is created through chemical processes in
>> the beans and while you lessen the amount of heat being applied
>> to the beans by the gun, the temperature of the beans will
>> increase (or stay steady). This is where the thermometer becomes
>> a valuable tool.
>
>> -Take a look at the temperature profiles I have posted in my
>> Hottop review to get an idea of what I am trying to accomplish.
>> These might help you develop more feel and control over what is
>> going on as well as experience the difference in flavor that a
>> longer roast creates. You might not like the taste, but it's
>> worth a shot.
>
> I'll check it out. So much cool stuff to learn and do. As a
> point of reference, I homebrew, and can appreciate specialized
> knowledge and the difference it can make in these complex
> processes. Much thanks, Randy.
>
> cheers,
> Scott S
>


Have a look at the "corretto" threads here
http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?board=roasting
There is a lot of information on an easier way to use heatguns

jmc
another homebrewer


    
Date: 27 Apr 2007 21:01:58
From: Scott Sellers
Subject: Re: basic roast profile advice
john <JohnREMOVE@fill-seal.com.au >:

[...]
>Have a look at the "corretto" threads here
>http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?board=roasting
>There is a lot of information on an easier way to use heatguns

Bookmarked. Looks like some good ideas.

Thanks.

cheers,
Scott S

--
Scott Sellers