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Date: 08 Nov 2006 13:11:33
From: JR
Subject: chocolate in Paris
Emerging from a long period of silence - new city, new job - not much
time to communicate during the last year.

For anybody who might be going to France soon: try chocolate from
Patrick Roger on Rue St. Germain des Pres. His dark chocolate with a
lemon-thyme ganache is a work of art. Don't miss it. In fact, don't
miss any of his chocolates - they are as good as it gets.

Coffee in France remains coffee in France. Most of it requires sugar
to be palatable. Amazing that a country with chocolate as good as
France drinks bad coffee. Maybe that's why the French used to prefer
hot chocolate in the morning?

JR





 
Date: 20 Nov 2006 06:48:50
From: John S.
Subject: Re: chocolate in Paris

Chris Staley wrote:
> On 9 Nov 2006 12:12:04 -0800, "John S." <hjsjms@cs.com> wrote:
>
> >TJ's chocolate bars are good...indeed very good. But I'm sure Joe
> >himself would agree they are not intended to be in the same league as
> >products from PR or other small chocolate houses.
> >
>
> Having purchased and taste tested all of the dark chocolate from
> TJ's, I can honestly say that I would reach for a bar of Valhrona 71%
> or 85% first over all their other offerings. My local TJ's also
> carries Scharfenberger, which is much too "earthy" tasting for my
> liking.

Yes, my opinion about Scharfenberger as well. I don't know what all
the fuss is about.


>
> I would supremely love to taste some of the artisanal bars from the
> smaller producers (many of which are discussed on
> http://www.seventypercent.com/ but I can't quite bring myself to pay
> the money required for a Bonnat, Cluizel or Amedei bar here in the
> states. And the truly fine stuff, such as the limited edition
> Valhrona Porcelana (50 quid for 324 grams) is way beyond my budget.
>
> I LOVE good dark chocolate, possibly even more than coffee ;-)

And I love them both taken at the same time. :)


>
> Chris



 
Date: 09 Nov 2006 12:12:04
From: John S.
Subject: Re: chocolate in Paris
TJ's chocolate bars are good...indeed very good. But I'm sure Joe
himself would agree they are not intended to be in the same league as
products from PR or other small chocolate houses.


JR wrote:
> I can honestly say that Patrick Roger's chocolate with the lemon-thyme
> ganache is the best confection I have ever eaten. Mind you, I
> generally do not like filled chocolates - I prefer solid tablets of
> good high-cocoa chocolate. But the lemon-thyme ganache is brilliant.
>
> Everything else I tried was excellent. His single-origin and blend
> tablets are as good as I have had: better than Dallet or Laduree. I
> have eaten Trader Joe's single origin bars in California, and I can
> only say the serious French chocolatiers are operating in an entirely
> different world. Even TJ's single-origin Sao Tome is a Hershey bar by
> comparison. Anybody who likes dark chocolate should take the chance to
> try real artisan chocolate if they get to Europe.
>
> By the way, I narrowly missed the annual "Salon du Chocolat". Sort of
> chocolatier's convention. It sounds amazing. I believe it travels to
> NY and a couple of other places where many of the US artisan chocolate
> makers show their stuff too. Worth looking for if you enjoy chocolate.
>
> JR
>
> John S. wrote:
> > JR wrote:
> > > Emerging from a long period of silence - new city, new job - not much
> > > time to communicate during the last year.
> > >
> > > For anybody who might be going to France soon: try chocolate from
> > > Patrick Roger on Rue St. Germain des Pres. His dark chocolate with a
> > > lemon-thyme ganache is a work of art. Don't miss it. In fact, don't
> > > miss any of his chocolates - they are as good as it gets.
> > >
> > > Coffee in France remains coffee in France. Most of it requires sugar
> > > to be palatable. Amazing that a country with chocolate as good as
> > > France drinks bad coffee. Maybe that's why the French used to prefer
> > > hot chocolate in the morning?
> > >
> > > JR
> >
> > I have read a couple of reviews about Patrick Roger that were very
> > positive. And one of the television channels, possibly public
> > television did a special on chocolate which included an interview at
> > the store in Paris. I could almost smell the chocolate.



  
Date: 20 Nov 2006 07:15:07
From: Chris Staley
Subject: Re: chocolate in Paris
On 9 Nov 2006 12:12:04 -0800, "John S." <hjsjms@cs.com > wrote:

>TJ's chocolate bars are good...indeed very good. But I'm sure Joe
>himself would agree they are not intended to be in the same league as
>products from PR or other small chocolate houses.
>

Having purchased and taste tested all of the dark chocolate from
TJ's, I can honestly say that I would reach for a bar of Valhrona 71%
or 85% first over all their other offerings. My local TJ's also
carries Scharfenberger, which is much too "earthy" tasting for my
liking.

I would supremely love to taste some of the artisanal bars from the
smaller producers (many of which are discussed on
http://www.seventypercent.com/ but I can't quite bring myself to pay
the money required for a Bonnat, Cluizel or Amedei bar here in the
states. And the truly fine stuff, such as the limited edition
Valhrona Porcelana (50 quid for 324 grams) is way beyond my budget.

I LOVE good dark chocolate, possibly even more than coffee ;-)

Chris


  
Date: 10 Nov 2006 06:52:45
From: I->Ian
Subject: Re: chocolate in Paris
On 9 Nov 2006 12:12:04 -0800, "John S." <hjsjms@cs.com > wrote:

>TJ's chocolate bars are good...indeed very good. But I'm sure Joe
>himself would agree they are not intended to be in the same league as
>products from PR or other small chocolate houses.

I'm still searching for a chocolatier who can produce treats as
exquisite as those in the movie 'Chocolat'

I don't put mix in my whisky or milk in my coffee, so I guess I prefer
my choco neat as well.


 
Date: 09 Nov 2006 11:20:16
From: JR
Subject: Re: chocolate in Paris
I can honestly say that Patrick Roger's chocolate with the lemon-thyme
ganache is the best confection I have ever eaten. Mind you, I
generally do not like filled chocolates - I prefer solid tablets of
good high-cocoa chocolate. But the lemon-thyme ganache is brilliant.

Everything else I tried was excellent. His single-origin and blend
tablets are as good as I have had: better than Dallet or Laduree. I
have eaten Trader Joe's single origin bars in California, and I can
only say the serious French chocolatiers are operating in an entirely
different world. Even TJ's single-origin Sao Tome is a Hershey bar by
comparison. Anybody who likes dark chocolate should take the chance to
try real artisan chocolate if they get to Europe.

By the way, I narrowly missed the annual "Salon du Chocolat". Sort of
chocolatier's convention. It sounds amazing. I believe it travels to
NY and a couple of other places where many of the US artisan chocolate
makers show their stuff too. Worth looking for if you enjoy chocolate.

JR

John S. wrote:
> JR wrote:
> > Emerging from a long period of silence - new city, new job - not much
> > time to communicate during the last year.
> >
> > For anybody who might be going to France soon: try chocolate from
> > Patrick Roger on Rue St. Germain des Pres. His dark chocolate with a
> > lemon-thyme ganache is a work of art. Don't miss it. In fact, don't
> > miss any of his chocolates - they are as good as it gets.
> >
> > Coffee in France remains coffee in France. Most of it requires sugar
> > to be palatable. Amazing that a country with chocolate as good as
> > France drinks bad coffee. Maybe that's why the French used to prefer
> > hot chocolate in the morning?
> >
> > JR
>
> I have read a couple of reviews about Patrick Roger that were very
> positive. And one of the television channels, possibly public
> television did a special on chocolate which included an interview at
> the store in Paris. I could almost smell the chocolate.



 
Date: 09 Nov 2006 08:10:35
From: John S.
Subject: Re: chocolate in Paris

JR wrote:
> Emerging from a long period of silence - new city, new job - not much
> time to communicate during the last year.
>
> For anybody who might be going to France soon: try chocolate from
> Patrick Roger on Rue St. Germain des Pres. His dark chocolate with a
> lemon-thyme ganache is a work of art. Don't miss it. In fact, don't
> miss any of his chocolates - they are as good as it gets.
>
> Coffee in France remains coffee in France. Most of it requires sugar
> to be palatable. Amazing that a country with chocolate as good as
> France drinks bad coffee. Maybe that's why the French used to prefer
> hot chocolate in the morning?
>
> JR

I have read a couple of reviews about Patrick Roger that were very
positive. And one of the television channels, possibly public
television did a special on chocolate which included an interview at
the store in Paris. I could almost smell the chocolate.



 
Date: 09 Nov 2006 00:02:52
From: I->Ian
Subject: Re: chocolate in Paris
>For anybody who might be going to France soon: try chocolate from
>Patrick Roger on Rue St. Germain des Pres. His dark chocolate with a
>lemon-thyme ganache is a work of art. Don't miss it. In fact, don't
>miss any of his chocolates - they are as good as it gets.


For plain dark chocolate, the single origin specialty ones from Trader
Joe's are superb.

The Venezuelan Ocue [Orange Label] is particularly delightful.