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Date: 06 Oct 2006 21:27:40
From: Coty189
Subject: coffee bean help
hello again,
I have two questions that I could use some help with.

1. Does any body have any ideas how I would go about determining the
type of a coffee bean based on their physical characteristics such as
density,color,moisture content, etc?

2. Also it seems to me that most of the home roasters on the ket do
not monitor the "real-time" condition of the bean during roasting. Any
suggestions how a roaster could be modified to better monitor the
condition of the beans. I think this could improve the quality of
roasts and prevent over or under roasting by people new to roasting.

any ideas are welcome, thanks





 
Date: 08 Oct 2006 11:45:06
From:
Subject: Re: coffee bean help

Coty189 wrote:
> hello again,
> I have two questions that I could use some help with.
>
> 1. Does any body have any ideas how I would go about determining the
> type of a coffee bean based on their physical characteristics such as
> density,color,moisture content, etc?
>
> 2. Also it seems to me that most of the home roasters on the ket do
> not monitor the "real-time" condition of the bean during roasting. Any
> suggestions how a roaster could be modified to better monitor the
> condition of the beans. I think this could improve the quality of
> roasts and prevent over or under roasting by people new to roasting.
>
> any ideas are welcome, thanks

The brown ones are roasted, and the pale ones are raw. That's about
as good as it gets with visual identification. Alas, the type of
modicifation you are speaking of would help the roast, as in profile
roasting techniques, but is economically impractical for the home.

-Donald Schoenholt



  
Date: 08 Oct 2006 09:07:39
From:
Subject: Re: coffee bean help
On 8 Oct 2006 11:45:06 -0700, i840coffee@optonline.net wrote:

>
>Coty189 wrote:
>> hello again,
>> I have two questions that I could use some help with.
>>
>> 1. Does any body have any ideas how I would go about determining
the
>> type of a coffee bean based on their physical characteristics such
as
>> density,color,moisture content, etc?
>>
>> 2. Also it seems to me that most of the home roasters on the ket
do
>> not monitor the "real-time" condition of the bean during roasting.
Any
>> suggestions how a roaster could be modified to better monitor the
>> condition of the beans. I think this could improve the quality of
>> roasts and prevent over or under roasting by people new to
roasting.
>>
>> any ideas are welcome, thanks
>
>The brown ones are roasted, and the pale ones are raw. That's about
>as good as it gets with visual identification. Alas, the type of
>modicifation you are speaking of would help the roast, as in profile
>roasting techniques, but is economically impractical for the home.
>
>-Donald Schoenholt

I agree Donald. I've been reading this thread with curiosity. When a
place here in Kona was caught selling fake Kona (think it was really
Costa Rican- sorry, semi memory failure) in 1996, scientists rushed in
to offer mapping the DNA of Kona so it could always be established as
real Kona. To date, I have not heard of one successful mapping. We
all gave various small samples, but I do not think anything worked
out.

aloha,
Cea
--smithfarms.com
farmers of pure kona
roast beans to kona to email


 
Date: 07 Oct 2006 20:10:44
From: Coty189
Subject: Re: coffee bean help
Imagine that a roasting machine existed that could determine what kind
of bean had been loaded into it. Also imagine that the machine can
monitor the beans "live" as they are being roasted. All the user would
have to do is select the darkness they want and press start.

This would be a roaster for somebody who doesn't have the experience of
a seasoned roaster

How do you think the machine could achieve this?



  
Date: 08 Oct 2006 15:50:32
From: Eureka
Subject: Re: coffee bean help
Coty189,
I don't think we'll ever see a coffee roasting machine like you envision,
just like we still don't have the perfect popcorn popper. I am going to
assume that your question has to do with your interest in finding the way to
the 'perfect cup of coffee'.

I got to tell you, and I am sure you already know this, that 'the perfect
cup of coffee' is found in the kettle at the end of the rainbow.

However, having said that, you can make the perfect cup very easily and
without spending much money on unnecessary expensive gadgets that will
eventually go the way all the exercise equipment goes after you buy it and
soon after have to store it because you have no time to use it.

The following is extracted from the website www.cafedepr.com. The good
thing about this recipe is that you can try it over and over until you find
the 'perfect cup' that suits your palate without spending much other than
some time and some coffee ground.

I'd like to share a family secret with you. This is the way my grandfather
(1896) and my mother (1913) would prepare the most delicious cup of coffee.
Keep in mind that coffee in those days was the main crop that my grandfather
produced in the family farm high in the mountains of Ciales, Puerto Rico
which was simply known as 'cafe de la montaņa'. This recipe is very easy to
make, yet, many people spoil a good cup of coffee. It's mind-boggling how
some with so little (just a cotton sock) can make the best cup of coffee in
the world yet some with such expensive espresso machines and grinders can
spoil the brew....Is it perhaps because they are starting with the wrong
beans or grind? OK! In a casserole pour 2, 3, 4, or 5 cups of water
(depending on how many cups you are making) and to that, add a little more
water to replace the evaporated loss. Measure 2, 3, 4, or 5 heaping
tablespoons of 'Café Real de Puerto RicoŽ or Cafe El Maņanero' and set
aside; at this time you should take care to close the coffee bag tightly and
put it back in the refrigerator or freezer. Heat the water to its boiling
point. As soon as the water starts bubbling from the bottom of the
casserole add the coffee to the water and stir to mix well with the water.
Lower the heat to low-medium and allow the coffee to cook in the boiling
water not more than 1 minute. Turn the heat completely off and let the
casserole stand on the burner simmering for another minute to two minutes
while you stir the coffee occasionally. The good thing about this is that
you do not need any expensive fancy urns or coffee makers to make this
excellent brew. Now here comes the good part; you are welcome to use a sock
or any cloth, preferably cotton, to drain or filter the brew right into your
cup. I highly recommend the Puerto Rico style inexpensive 'colador'. The
important thing is not to allow the coffee ground to get into the cup of
coffee..... There! Buen Provecho! Enjoy your coffee and spread the word!

Always a pleasure,
Felix


"Coty189" <lindelco@student.gvsu.edu > wrote in message
news:1160277044.189357.98750@c28g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Imagine that a roasting machine existed that could determine what kind
> of bean had been loaded into it. Also imagine that the machine can
> monitor the beans "live" as they are being roasted. All the user would
> have to do is select the darkness they want and press start.
>
> This would be a roaster for somebody who doesn't have the experience of
> a seasoned roaster
>
> How do you think the machine could achieve this?
>




  
Date: 08 Oct 2006 12:57:00
From: The Other Funk
Subject: Re: coffee bean help
Finding the keyboard operational
Coty189 entered:

> Imagine that a roasting machine existed that could determine what kind
> of bean had been loaded into it. Also imagine that the machine can
> monitor the beans "live" as they are being roasted. All the user
> would have to do is select the darkness they want and press start.
>
> This would be a roaster for somebody who doesn't have the experience
> of a seasoned roaster
>
> How do you think the machine could achieve this?

Off the top of my head and by no means accurate.
Ambient temp.
Ambient humidity
Bean moisture
bean size
Bean density
green bean color
Total green bean weight
Drum Temp.
Bean temp in roaster vs time
gas Flow
Elapsed time
Bean color
Sound - listen for1st and 2nd crck
smell
Taste - you wouldn't taste a 400 deg bean but if you are using a machine why
not
Cooling rate.

Oh and the machine would have to learn how to best achieve the color using
the variables. Still you wolldn't be able to just throw a bunch of beans in
it. How would it be able to handle blends?
Now I don't measure all these variables when I roast. Some are intuitive,
some are adjust on the fly.
Bob



--
--
Coffee worth staying up for - NY Times
www.moondoggiecoffee.com



  
Date: 08 Oct 2006 11:32:52
From: Ivo van der Putten
Subject: Re: coffee bean help
Coty189 schreef:
> Imagine that a roasting machine existed that could determine what kind
> of bean had been loaded into it. Also imagine that the machine can
> monitor the beans "live" as they are being roasted. All the user would
> have to do is select the darkness they want and press start.
>
> This would be a roaster for somebody who doesn't have the experience of
> a seasoned roaster
>
> How do you think the machine could achieve this?
>

Maybe the same way a frying pan determines the egg?

Ivo


 
Date: 07 Oct 2006 17:33:58
From: Eureka
Subject: Re: coffee bean help
To Coty189,
To the naked eye there is really no way of determining the type of a coffee
bean based on their physical characteristics. With time and experience you
could be able to distinguish the difference in density of an Arabica bean
that's say 'super premium select' to an Arabica bean that's say 'regular'.
One way, however, I recommend is to get to know and trust your supplier.
There are many online suppliers that advertise coffee from every corner of
the world. I'd stay away from those because often times they themselves
don't really know what they are getting.
I can offer you to buy, to try this out, 8oz of Arabica gourmet green or
roasted beans and 8oz of Arabica regular green or roasted beans so that you
can see the difference in density of the two beans. The gourmet beans would
be much heavier that the regular and consequently less beans per pound. The
coffee I sell is guaranteed to come from small farms in the high altitude
mountains of icao and Jayuya Puerto Rico. I deal directly with them
because I trust their product and have visited their farms. I refuse to
sell coffee that I could not guarantee its origin.
Hope this helps,
http://www.cafedepr.com


"Coty189" <lindelco@student.gvsu.edu > wrote in message
news:1160195260.486961.127910@e3g2000cwe.googlegroups.com...
> hello again,
> I have two questions that I could use some help with.
>
> 1. Does any body have any ideas how I would go about determining the
> type of a coffee bean based on their physical characteristics such as
> density,color,moisture content, etc?
>
> 2. Also it seems to me that most of the home roasters on the ket do
> not monitor the "real-time" condition of the bean during roasting. Any
> suggestions how a roaster could be modified to better monitor the
> condition of the beans. I think this could improve the quality of
> roasts and prevent over or under roasting by people new to roasting.
>
> any ideas are welcome, thanks
>




 
Date: 07 Oct 2006 10:30:16
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: coffee bean help

Coty189 wrote:
> hello again,
> I have two questions that I could use some help with.
>
> 1. Does any body have any ideas how I would go about determining the
> type of a coffee bean based on their physical characteristics such as
> density,color,moisture content, etc?

Genes for the crossbreeds and origins, and agricultural training
manuals for plant characteristics and effects climatic or local
conditions produce. Quickest approach might be to look for shipping
points and jobbers that initially grade and certify coffee for
keting.



 
Date: 07 Oct 2006 15:51:03
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: coffee bean help
On 6 Oct 2006 21:27:40 -0700, "Coty189" <lindelco@student.gvsu.edu >
wrote:

>hello again,
> I have two questions that I could use some help with.
>
>1. Does any body have any ideas how I would go about determining the
>type of a coffee bean based on their physical characteristics such as
>density,color,moisture content, etc?

What categories do you have in mind for "type?" Country? Region?
Altitude? Climate? Cultivar? Pre-roast? Post-roast? There are lots of
tools for measuring the physical characteristics of coffee and
laboratories that specialize in the work for the coffee industry. I
don't know how much of it would apply to hobbyists.
>
>2. Also it seems to me that most of the home roasters on the ket do
>not monitor the "real-time" condition of the bean during roasting. Any
>suggestions how a roaster could be modified to better monitor the
>condition of the beans. I think this could improve the quality of
>roasts and prevent over or under roasting by people new to roasting.
>
>any ideas are welcome, thanks

There are some profile controllers on the ket now that are designed
for home roasters.

shall