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Date: 25 Nov 2006 17:21:39
From: tag gallagher
Subject: crema & pavoni
I've been using a Pavoni Europiccola for years but have not been able to
get a good crema (using Lavazza beans, which I grind).

Is this likely due to the beans being ground too fine? or not fine enough?

Do you people like to tamp as firmly as possible, or hardly at all (as
some Pavoni users recommend)?

Is it possible, using a home machine, to get the kind of rich thick
crema espresso that a really good bar achieves?




 
Date: 10 Dec 2006 19:39:07
From: RED DEVIL
Subject: Re: crema & pavoni
On Sat, 25 Nov 2006 17:21:39 GMT, tag gallagher <tag@sprynet.com >
wrote:

>I've been using a Pavoni Europiccola for years but have not been able to
>get a good crema (using Lavazza beans, which I grind).
>
> Is this likely due to the beans being ground too fine? or not fine enough?
>
> Do you people like to tamp as firmly as possible, or hardly at all (as
>some Pavoni users recommend)?
>
> Is it possible, using a home machine, to get the kind of rich thick
>crema espresso that a really good bar achieves?

A lot depends on what grinder you are using, but it's all really a
case of trial and error. There are so many factors involved.
I had my Pavoni 3 months before I got it producing a good amount of
crema, I experimented with different beans, roasts (I home roast) and
of course grinds. Without knowing what kind of grinder you are using
I'll try to give you a couple of pointers..

The grind I've had the most success with is fine enough to still
'clump" but still have a slightly gritty feel to it. But here's where
I made my breakthrough on crema...

I make sure that everything is spotlessly clean, especially the
brew group head. Then I prepare the basket with the coffee and apply
medium amount of down pressure and always make sure I polish the puck
well. Then I will pull 3 oz's of water through the head, I nearly
always find this first pull isn't as hot as I need so aften I'll pull
a second 3 ozs....when I hear a gurgling and steaming sound I know
that it's ready for the basket with my coffee in it. I immediately put
the basket in and pull my shot, I generally take about a 20 second
pull. Using this method I am getting anywhere from 50% to 80% Crema
depending on the coffee I use.

Good luck


 
Date: 25 Nov 2006 23:27:05
From: IMAWriter
Subject: Re: crema & pavoni
Alan wrote:
> "tag gallagher" wrote
> > I've been using a Pavoni Europiccola for years but have not been able to
> > get a good crema (using Lavazza beans, which I grind).
[snipped]
Hi...someone here please correct me if I'm wrong, but I have always
read that lever style machines such as the La Pavoni, while often
producing awesome tasting shots, also tend to produce LESS CREMA than
the standard semi auto E61 style HX.'



 
Date: 25 Nov 2006 20:33:48
From: Alan
Subject: Re: crema & pavoni

"tag gallagher" wrote
> I've been using a Pavoni Europiccola for years but have not been able to
> get a good crema (using Lavazza beans, which I grind).
>
> Is this likely due to the beans being ground too fine? or not fine enough?
>
> Do you people like to tamp as firmly as possible, or hardly at all (as
> some Pavoni users recommend)?
>
> Is it possible, using a home machine, to get the kind of rich thick crema
> espresso that a really good bar achieves?

I'd first of all suspect the Lavazza beans --- they're not at all likely to
have been freshly roasted.
As for the grind, you should experiment --- I find that I get more crema
with a finer grind; there are limits, of course. You don't want to get as
fine as Turkish, as you'll run into clogging problems.
As for the tamping, I've come to the conclusion that there's very little
difference between a light tamp or a heavy tamp in terms of crema
production.
Two things that I've noticed that do seem to result in better crema
production are:
(1) pre-infusion: before pulling that lever down, wait until enough water
has passed thru the coffee to cover the bottom of your demitasse
and
(2) a good, healthy downward pressure on that lever. The Europiccola is a
pretty rugged piece of equipment and you don't need to "baby" it. I've
found that the more muscle I put into a consistent,
don't-stop-till-you're-done downward thrust, the more crema I get.

Also, if you're using the older 2-switch model (as I do), pull your shot
BEFORE you ramp up to high heat for steaming, as too high a water
temperature can reduce crema production as well. Use high setting to start
the machine up, but switch to low when steam begins to lazily escape from
the safety valve, then pull the shot. If you leave it on high, with steam
fairly shooting out of the safety valve (which is just right for steaming),
it's too hot for espresso production . . .




 
Date: 25 Nov 2006 13:35:56
From: Harry Moos
Subject: Re: crema & pavoni
It's likely to be due to stale beans. Unless they have been roasted in the
past week [10 days at most], I am not able to get a good crema. The Lavazza
beans are probably much older than that, aren't they? Unless you are
located in Italy. I don't think the tamp pressure makes much difference, as
long as the coffee fills in the PF evenly.

"tag gallagher" <tag@sprynet.com > wrote in message
news:DY_9h.3792$1s6.3606@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> I've been using a Pavoni Europiccola for years but have not been able to
> get a good crema (using Lavazza beans, which I grind).
>
> Is this likely due to the beans being ground too fine? or not fine enough?
>
> Do you people like to tamp as firmly as possible, or hardly at all (as
> some Pavoni users recommend)?
>
> Is it possible, using a home machine, to get the kind of rich thick crema
> espresso that a really good bar achieves?