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Date: 20 Oct 2006 06:06:08
From: Johnny
Subject: flavor components: cupping vs espresso
I recently attended a cupping at a local roaster where they were comparing
their in-house espresso blends with some espresso blends from Barefoot
including Redwood.
Which makes me wonder which flavor components will be enhanced or muted by
traditional cupping of coffees roasted specifically for espresso vs how
those same taste as espresso?






 
Date: 20 Oct 2006 09:43:21
From: jim schulman
Subject: Re: flavor components: cupping vs espresso
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 06:06:08 -0700, "Johnny"
<removethis.huuanito@hotmail.com > wrote:

>I recently attended a cupping at a local roaster where they were comparing
>their in-house espresso blends with some espresso blends from Barefoot
>including Redwood.
>Which makes me wonder which flavor components will be enhanced or muted by
>traditional cupping of coffees roasted specifically for espresso vs how
>those same taste as espresso?
>

In general, acidity and astringent-bitter flavors like wood are
accentuated in espresso, whereas medium flavors like dark fruit,
caramel and chocolate are not. This is why Brazils are used, since
they are all medium flavors, and balance out the taste.


  
Date: 20 Oct 2006 11:16:42
From: Johnny
Subject: Re: flavor components: cupping vs espresso

"jim schulman" <jim_schulman@ameritech.net > wrote in message
news:junhj2l49nvqkvr6kbaeh61km393lfnagl@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 06:06:08 -0700, "Johnny"
> <removethis.huuanito@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> >I recently attended a cupping at a local roaster where they were
comparing
> >their in-house espresso blends with some espresso blends from Barefoot
> >including Redwood.
> >Which makes me wonder which flavor components will be enhanced or muted
by
> >traditional cupping of coffees roasted specifically for espresso vs how
> >those same taste as espresso?
> >
>
> In general, acidity and astringent-bitter flavors like wood are
> accentuated in espresso, whereas medium flavors like dark fruit,
> caramel and chocolate are not. This is why Brazils are used, since
> they are all medium flavors, and balance out the taste.

Thanks Jim




   
Date: 20 Oct 2006 14:39:08
From: Johnny
Subject: Re: flavor components: cupping vs espresso

"Johnny" <removethis.huuanito@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:yn8_g.1797$UJ2.909@fed1read07...
>
> "jim schulman" <jim_schulman@ameritech.net> wrote in message
> news:junhj2l49nvqkvr6kbaeh61km393lfnagl@4ax.com...
> > On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 06:06:08 -0700, "Johnny"
> > <removethis.huuanito@hotmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > >I recently attended a cupping at a local roaster where they were
> comparing
> > >their in-house espresso blends with some espresso blends from Barefoot
> > >including Redwood.
> > >Which makes me wonder which flavor components will be enhanced or
muted
> by
> > >traditional cupping of coffees roasted specifically for espresso vs how
> > >those same taste as espresso?
> > >
> >
> > In general, acidity and astringent-bitter flavors like wood are
> > accentuated in espresso, whereas medium flavors like dark fruit,
> > caramel and chocolate are not. This is why Brazils are used, since
> > they are all medium flavors, and balance out the taste.
>
> Thanks Jim
>
>
So as a followup:
why is it that the preferred roast levels for espresso tend to be light,
before 2nd crack?
This would accentuate the acidity and then when the espresso process does
the same. It seems counter-intuitive.

I'm asking as the Barefoot blends seemed bright during the conventional
cupping. I haven't tasted them as espresso but from what you say it sounds
as if they'd likely be even brighter as espresso?




    
Date: 20 Oct 2006 19:05:38
From: jim schulman
Subject: Re: flavor components: cupping vs espresso
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 14:39:08 -0700, "Johnny"
<removethis.huuanito@hotmail.com > wrote:

>So as a followup:
>why is it that the preferred roast levels for espresso tend to be light,
>before 2nd crack?
>This would accentuate the acidity and then when the espresso process does
>the same. It seems counter-intuitive.

I don't think anyone except Terroir pulls their espresso before the
first pops of the second; and almost all conventional espresso blends
are roasted to the start of a rolling second or beyond. Very light
roasted espresso blends tend to be all or mostly low acid coffees.

>
>I'm asking as the Barefoot blends seemed bright during the conventional
>cupping. I haven't tasted them as espresso but from what you say it sounds
>as if they'd likely be even brighter as espresso?

Yes it will -- brew it hot.


     
Date: 20 Oct 2006 21:57:31
From: Johnny
Subject: Re: flavor components: cupping vs espresso

"jim schulman" <jim_schulman@ameritech.net > wrote in message
news:juoij2t01iu5g9s8rgtsal96qhqvt6p73h@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 14:39:08 -0700, "Johnny"
> <removethis.huuanito@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> >So as a followup:
> >why is it that the preferred roast levels for espresso tend to be light,
> >before 2nd crack?
> >This would accentuate the acidity and then when the espresso process
does
> >the same. It seems counter-intuitive.
>
> I don't think anyone except Terroir pulls their espresso before the
> first pops of the second; and almost all conventional espresso blends
> are roasted to the start of a rolling second or beyond. Very light
> roasted espresso blends tend to be all or mostly low acid coffees.
>
> >
> >I'm asking as the Barefoot blends seemed bright during the conventional
> >cupping. I haven't tasted them as espresso but from what you say it
sounds
> >as if they'd likely be even brighter as espresso?
>
> Yes it will -- brew it hot.

I guess my confusion stems from the term 'light roast'. I just did a bit
nore research and I see now that light roast can mean the first snaps or
even a few snaps into rolling 2nd. I'd always thought of a light roast as
being pre 2nd.
Thanks for clearing that up Jim




      
Date: 21 Oct 2006 02:28:39
From: jim schulman
Subject: Re: flavor components: cupping vs espresso
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 21:57:31 -0700, "Johnny"
<removethis.huuanito@hotmail.com > wrote:

>I guess my confusion stems from the term 'light roast'. I just did a bit
>nore research and I see now that light roast can mean the first snaps or
>even a few snaps into rolling 2nd. I'd always thought of a light roast as
>being pre 2nd.
>Thanks for clearing that up Jim

Light roasts for regular coffee can be pulled right after the first
crack stops (Cinnamon - ca 415F) or ten to 15 degrees beyond that
(City). But these roasts are never used for espresso (except by
Terroir, experimentally). A "light" roast for espresso is pulled
around 440F to 445F, although somne adventurous blends seem to be
pulled at around 435F. These are all medium roasts.

The above temperature info is based on a first crack that starts at
395F, finishes at 410F, and a second crack that starts at 440F to
445F, and gets rolling 5 degrees higher than that (1st crack
temperatures tend to rise, and 2nd crack temperatures tend to drop in
longer roasts -- these temps are based on 10 to 13 minutes roasts)