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Date: 02 Feb 2007 08:55:45
From: chardinej
Subject: humidity and timing
Here in eastern Canada we've gone through a prolonged period of cold
weather with temperatures often being -20=B0C or colder in the morning
to highs of -10 to -17=B0C during the day. With this cold weather comes
a reduction in humidity of the air and ultimately I assume, of coffee
beens, although I store my fresh beans in an airtight container.

Today the weather broke and it is hovering around the 0=B0 C k so the
air is damper. With this damper air I have noticed a significant
speeding up of the pour from a normal 25-30 s to 15 s plus or minus.
Suddenly, without changing anything myself (grind, dose, tamp) the
pours are too quick. Is this in the expected direction: higher
humidity =3D quicker pours? If it isn't I wonder if it is simply the
beans slowly aging and drying out against the higher humidity of today
(they are about 5 days past roast date).

John





 
Date: 03 Feb 2007 22:28:02
From: Jack Maars
Subject: Re: humidity and timing

"chardinej" <chardine@nbnet.nb.ca > wrote in message
news:1170435345.189242.213190@s48g2000cws.googlegroups.com...
Here in eastern Canada we've gone through a prolonged period of cold
weather with temperatures often being -20C or colder in the morning
to highs of -10 to -17C during the day. With this cold weather comes
a reduction in humidity of the air and ultimately I assume, of coffee
beens, although I store my fresh beans in an airtight container.

Just buy a can of Folgers Mountain Roast and enjoy.




 
Date: 02 Feb 2007 12:22:42
From: I->Ian
Subject: Re: humidity and timing
On 2 Feb 2007 08:55:45 -0800, "chardinej" <chardine@nbnet.nb.ca >
wrote:

>Here in eastern Canada we've gone through a prolonged period of cold
>weather with temperatures often being -20C or colder in the morning
>to highs of -10 to -17C during the day. With this cold weather comes
>a reduction in humidity of the air and ultimately I assume, of coffee
>beens, although I store my fresh beans in an airtight container.
>
>Today the weather broke and it is hovering around the 0 C k so the
>air is damper. With this damper air I have noticed a significant
>speeding up of the pour from a normal 25-30 s to 15 s plus or minus.
>Suddenly, without changing anything myself (grind, dose, tamp) the
>pours are too quick. Is this in the expected direction: higher
>humidity = quicker pours? If it isn't I wonder if it is simply the
>beans slowly aging and drying out against the higher humidity of today
>(they are about 5 days past roast date).
>
>John

This maybe of interest
http://www.coffeeresearch.org/espresso/potential.htm


 
Date: 02 Feb 2007 14:14:17
From: daveb
Subject: Re: humidity and timing
Variations in ambient temp. and humidity require constant adjustments in the
grind.

sad but true.


dave



"chardinej" <chardine@nbnet.nb.ca > wrote in message
news:1170435345.189242.213190@s48g2000cws.googlegroups.com...
Here in eastern Canada we've gone through a prolonged period of cold
weather with temperatures often being -20C or colder in the morning
to highs of -10 to -17C during the day. With this cold weather comes
a reduction in humidity of the air and ultimately I assume, of coffee
beens, although I store my fresh beans in an airtight container.

Today the weather broke and it is hovering around the 0 C k so the
air is damper. With this damper air I have noticed a significant
speeding up of the pour from a normal 25-30 s to 15 s plus or minus.
Suddenly, without changing anything myself (grind, dose, tamp) the
pours are too quick. Is this in the expected direction: higher
humidity = quicker pours? If it isn't I wonder if it is simply the
beans slowly aging and drying out against the higher humidity of today
(they are about 5 days past roast date).

John