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Date: 06 Jan 2007 15:14:30
From: omnipotent_1
Subject: iroast2 profiles for newbies
I just got an iroast 2 for X-mas with a sampler of 5 different beans. There
is so much information out there that it is hard to sift through just to
find something that is geared towards the novice coffee roaster. What bean
is better roasted to light, medium, full city, or vienna? I've pretty much
been doing the trial and error thing to start with mixed results.

So I though it might be a good idea to have a thread where those like me can
post their results and maybe others can make suggestions along the way.

I guess I'll start with my results thusfar.

The beans I have are part of the gift, which came from Bald Mountain Coffee.
So, I'm not sure about the quality of this coffee in general.

The first roast, sans any research, went to a Yirgacheffe. I did not record
the settings but I can say that I used two scoops worth and ended up with a
medium roast. Now, somebody can tell me if I'm wrong, but I think maybe
these beans are meant to be espresso/vienna roast? So I've left the rest for
a later date.

Next I went with a Colombian Supremo Popayan. 375/5:00m -- > 405/4:00 -->
445/1:30
Way too lightly roasted. Even with a slight adjustment in time and temp
resulted in a slightly darker roast. I guess these beans can withstand a
long and/or hotter roast. Unfortunately, I've used them all up.

More results to come.






 
Date: 08 Jan 2007 13:14:05
From: I->Ian
Subject: Re: iroast2 profiles for newbies
On Sat, 6 Jan 2007 15:14:30 -0500, "omnipotent_1"
<omnipotent_1@comcast.net > wrote:

>
>The beans I have are part of the gift, which came from Bald Mountain Coffee.
>So, I'm not sure about the quality of this coffee in general.

Generally excellent over many varieties over many purchases of many
10s of pounds


 
Date: 07 Jan 2007 20:23:39
From: jw
Subject: Re: iroast2 profiles for newbies
It came to pass that on 06 Jan 2007, omnipotent_1 scribed thusly to all
in alt.coffee the following inspiration:

> Next I went with a Colombian Supremo Popayan. 375/5:00m --> 405/4:00
> --> 445/1:30 Way too lightly roasted. Even with a slight adjustment in
> time and temp resulted in a slightly darker roast. I guess these beans
> can withstand a long and/or hotter roast. Unfortunately, I've used
> them all up.

I got an iroast 2 for this past Xmas, and I based my profile on the
review over at coffeegeek.com.

5 minutes at 385F (my machine reads 318 at the end of the 5 minutes)
3 minutes at 430F (my machine reads 342 at the end of the 3 minutes)
4 minutes at 465F (my machine reads 367 just before the cooling cycle
begins)

This has gotten me some fairly good and repeatable results, which is
good. Sometimes I hit the cool button in the middle of the 465F cycle
when it seems to have hit the color I'm looking for.

It certainly is hard to hear any "cracks", at least for the 2nd crack.
I *think* I'm hearing the first cracks.

Anyway, good luck to you and I'm going to continue to watch this thread.

--
jw

"Although prepared for tyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed."
-- Sir Winston Churchill


 
Date: 06 Jan 2007 21:35:32
From: bardogg
Subject: Re: iroast2 profiles for newbies
My advice when you first get started is not to worry to much about the
profile, that's really for tweaking things once you get the basics down
and begin to figure out what flavors you really like (for example, your
instinct on the yirg is correct, it tends to have a lot more
distinctive flavors than other beans and roasting darker can mellow it
more)

I have the iRoast 1, but it's basically the same machine; when you
first start roasting, just go with the presets, maybe increase the time
to be sure you've got plenty of room and then listen for the cracks.
First crack should be fairly obvious -- big pops, a bit like popcorn,
starting slowly and then picking up. Be sure you're well through that
with whatever your roast and then try stopping the roast manually at
various points in between that and second crack, which is more like
aluminum foil rustling. Also be sure that you're giving the beans at
least 24 hours (48 is even better) rest before grinding and brewing.

You should order a 5lb bag of a relatively inexpensive bean to
experiment with so that you can assess how different stopping points
affect the flavors. Sweet ias is a great source -- Tom is a
brilliant cupper and only stocks beans that meet his exacting standards
and he's scrupulously fair on price. You can also order some of his
roasted product and then roast the same varietal and compare results,
which is another good way to establish a benchk when first getting
started. I roasted for 1.5 yrs before realizing that the reason my
friends didn't like my coffee was not their underdeveloped palates but
my mistaken belief that the sour notes from underroasted beans were
"true varietal flavor." Having something to compare against can speed
up that learning curve considerably.

Good luck and enjoy!

omnipotent_1 wrote:
> I just got an iroast 2 for X-mas with a sampler of 5 different beans. There
> is so much information out there that it is hard to sift through just to
> find something that is geared towards the novice coffee roaster. What bean
> is better roasted to light, medium, full city, or vienna? I've pretty much
> been doing the trial and error thing to start with mixed results.
>
> So I though it might be a good idea to have a thread where those like me can
> post their results and maybe others can make suggestions along the way.
>
> I guess I'll start with my results thusfar.
>
> The beans I have are part of the gift, which came from Bald Mountain Coffee.
> So, I'm not sure about the quality of this coffee in general.
>
> The first roast, sans any research, went to a Yirgacheffe. I did not record
> the settings but I can say that I used two scoops worth and ended up with a
> medium roast. Now, somebody can tell me if I'm wrong, but I think maybe
> these beans are meant to be espresso/vienna roast? So I've left the rest for
> a later date.
>
> Next I went with a Colombian Supremo Popayan. 375/5:00m --> 405/4:00 -->
> 445/1:30
> Way too lightly roasted. Even with a slight adjustment in time and temp
> resulted in a slightly darker roast. I guess these beans can withstand a
> long and/or hotter roast. Unfortunately, I've used them all up.
>
> More results to come.



 
Date: 06 Jan 2007 13:12:41
From: Rayh
Subject: Re: iroast2 profiles for newbies

Mine is an IRoast 1, but the profile should still work

The roast I use sounds a bit unusual, but it consistently gives a med
to dark roast bean with a lot of oil on the bean, As long as it is warm
outside..........
My roast times are as follows,
460 deg F ( 240Celcius) for 2 minutes
410 deg F (210Celcius) for 3 minutes
450 deg F (230Celcius) for 2.5 minutes
Way shorter than the profiles built in, and hotter but it seems to
work....and does get into the second "crack" if you listen carefully
I just cannot overstate tho how critical the outside air temp is, if
its a cold day, I just bite the bullet and roast indoors.