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Date: 23 Jan 2007 16:57:21
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: results of 'cold' weather roasting
The weather has been miserable for a few weeks, at least by Texas Gulf Coast
standards; rain, wind, & low 30's to mid 40's. I ran out of home roast so
decided to brave the elements & broke out the TurboCrazy on the covered back
porch. My TC has the popper heating element disconnected and it took a lot
longer than usual for the beans to reach first crack, in fact I couldn't get
more than a few crackles into second crack. I had to settle for a City
Roast, when normally I prefer most beans at a City+ or even a light Vienna.

Surprise! The resulting coffee was fantastic, round & fruity with plenty of
chocolate from an Indian Dewan Estate Kohinoor. I usually find this bean a
bit bland at this roast but not this batch and the only thing different was
the low ambient temperature causing the roast to proceed more slowly. Out of
curiosity I froze a batch of the same beans overnight & took them straight
from the freezer to the TC.

Yesterday I roasted these & an unfrozen batch of the same bean to the same
City Roast, just approaching second crack. Today I tried an unscientific
sampling of the two roasts & I believe I may be onto something. The frozen
beans seem to retain more of the varietals flavor that Sweet ia's claimed
was there, flavors I was just getting a hint of in my usual roasts. I don't
believe the freezing of the beans was the priy reason for the improvement
however, after all beans eventually reached the same temperature. What may
be happening is that the cold weather & frozen beans are prolonging the time
it takes to reach first crack & this is causing the beans to retain more of
their flavors.

So, maybe I will PID my TC so I can better control the roast temps, with the
goal being a slower roasting curve. Hopefully I can find a setting(s) that
will let me replicate the results of roasting cold beans. Anyone have
similar experiences?

--
Robert (Gig'm Aggies!) Harmon
http://tinyurl.com/pou2y
http://tinyurl.com/psfob
http://tinyurl.com/fkd6r






 
Date: 23 Jan 2007 20:30:44
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: results of 'cold' weather roasting


On Jan 23, 6:29 pm, "wakajawaka" <i...@home.com > wrote:

> I'll probably never get around to modding my PII, so maybe I'll try roasting
> in a box with a couple bags of ice this summer. I've made beer in the hot
> summer using that method and it worked for that.

I've been under the wrong impression faster is better just getting it
done. Half a pound in half an hour, three times around. Cooling
cycles, for instance. I've been putting in fresh green beans early,
not to waste heat off the fan-only cycle to cool down the element. An
intended cooling cycle to cool hot beans down and not the element and
not for beginning to recycle heat for the next batch of beans. Fresh,
hot beans slapped into a colander that appear to do well enough on
their own without extra fan time. Nevermind the instructions - this is
not commercial, don't use it hard and steady. Been going by feel for
machine tolerances. Looks like I need slow it down - keeping within 18
minutes on the half pound or 6 minutes roast time into a crack on a
Freshroast. Probably been running 5 minutes if not under. If that
doesn't work, I'll lighten measures or get into an easy rheostat
modifiction from the manufacturer how-to link.



 
Date: 23 Jan 2007 18:29:10
From: wakajawaka
Subject: Re: results of 'cold' weather roasting
I've had the same experience with my unmodified Poppery II in the Atlanta
area. In the summer I have to roast at by 7 AM before it gets too hot and
the thermal fuse trips. It takes 3-4 minutes to reach 2nd crack.

This winter I've been roasting with temps in the 40s and the coffee tastes
much better. It takes 10-15 minutes to reach 2nd crack depending on the
bean and the air temp.

This seems to be the best range for me. My Z&D roaster takes 20-23 minutes
for 2nd crack and the coffee tastes flat.

I'll probably never get around to modding my PII, so maybe I'll try roasting
in a box with a couple bags of ice this summer. I've made beer in the hot
summer using that method and it worked for that.

Don


"Robert Harmon" <r_h_harmon@Zhotmail.com > wrote in message
news:R7rth.14373$w91.12032@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> The weather has been miserable for a few weeks, at least by Texas Gulf
> Coast standards; rain, wind, & low 30's to mid 40's. I ran out of home
> roast so decided to brave the elements & broke out the TurboCrazy on the
> covered back porch. My TC has the popper heating element disconnected and
> it took a lot longer than usual for the beans to reach first crack, in
> fact I couldn't get more than a few crackles into second crack. I had to
> settle for a City Roast, when normally I prefer most beans at a City+ or
> even a light Vienna.
>
> Surprise! The resulting coffee was fantastic, round & fruity with plenty
> of chocolate from an Indian Dewan Estate Kohinoor. I usually find this
> bean a bit bland at this roast but not this batch and the only thing
> different was the low ambient temperature causing the roast to proceed
> more slowly. Out of curiosity I froze a batch of the same beans overnight
> & took them straight from the freezer to the TC.
>
> Yesterday I roasted these & an unfrozen batch of the same bean to the same
> City Roast, just approaching second crack. Today I tried an unscientific
> sampling of the two roasts & I believe I may be onto something. The frozen
> beans seem to retain more of the varietals flavor that Sweet ia's
> claimed was there, flavors I was just getting a hint of in my usual
> roasts. I don't believe the freezing of the beans was the priy reason
> for the improvement however, after all beans eventually reached the same
> temperature. What may be happening is that the cold weather & frozen beans
> are prolonging the time it takes to reach first crack & this is causing
> the beans to retain more of their flavors.
>
> So, maybe I will PID my TC so I can better control the roast temps, with
> the goal being a slower roasting curve. Hopefully I can find a setting(s)
> that will let me replicate the results of roasting cold beans. Anyone have
> similar experiences?
>
> --
> Robert (Gig'm Aggies!) Harmon
> http://tinyurl.com/pou2y
> http://tinyurl.com/psfob
> http://tinyurl.com/fkd6r
>




 
Date: 23 Jan 2007 13:28:40
From: Heat + Beans
Subject: Re: results of 'cold' weather roasting

Robert Harmon wrote:
What may
> be happening is that the cold weather & frozen beans are prolonging the time
> it takes to reach first crack & this is causing the beans to retain more of
> their flavors.
>
1. IMO, about 6 minutes to 1st c. is a tipping point. Less than that
is, on average, less good. Further, flattening the ramp in minutes
4-6 is better than charging into 1st. Longer than 6 minutes is
certainly OK, but I've never noticed any particular benefit.
2. Coffee tastes better in cold weather.

tin



 
Date: 23 Jan 2007 10:34:28
From: bernie
Subject: Re: results of 'cold' weather roasting
Robert Harmon wrote:
> The weather has been miserable for a few weeks, at least by Texas Gulf Coast
> standards; rain, wind, & low 30's to mid 40's. I ran out of home roast so
> decided to brave the elements & broke out the TurboCrazy on the covered back
> porch. My TC has the popper heating element disconnected and it took a lot
> longer than usual for the beans to reach first crack, in fact I couldn't get
> more than a few crackles into second crack. I had to settle for a City
> Roast, when normally I prefer most beans at a City+ or even a light Vienna.
>
> Surprise! The resulting coffee was fantastic, round & fruity with plenty of
> chocolate from an Indian Dewan Estate Kohinoor. I usually find this bean a
> bit bland at this roast but not this batch and the only thing different was
> the low ambient temperature causing the roast to proceed more slowly. Out of
> curiosity I froze a batch of the same beans overnight & took them straight
> from the freezer to the TC.
>
> Yesterday I roasted these & an unfrozen batch of the same bean to the same
> City Roast, just approaching second crack. Today I tried an unscientific
> sampling of the two roasts & I believe I may be onto something. The frozen
> beans seem to retain more of the varietals flavor that Sweet ia's claimed
> was there, flavors I was just getting a hint of in my usual roasts. I don't
> believe the freezing of the beans was the priy reason for the improvement
> however, after all beans eventually reached the same temperature. What may
> be happening is that the cold weather & frozen beans are prolonging the time
> it takes to reach first crack & this is causing the beans to retain more of
> their flavors.
>
> So, maybe I will PID my TC so I can better control the roast temps, with the
> goal being a slower roasting curve. Hopefully I can find a setting(s) that
> will let me replicate the results of roasting cold beans. Anyone have
> similar experiences?
>

Why do I have an image of Harmon sitting in the boiler of a beached
ship roasting coffee and telling anyone opening the door...
"there are strange sights
under the Gulf Coast lights
but no stranger will
you ever see
Than Harmon sitting
on his closed in porch
and roasting frozen Kohinoor".

'pologies to Mr.Service.

Bernie


  
Date: 23 Jan 2007 12:52:43
From: Ken Fox
Subject: Re: results of 'cold' weather roasting
"bernie" <bdigman@zianet.com > wrote in message
news:45b64725@nntp.zianet.com...
> >>
>
> Why do I have an image of Harmon sitting in the boiler of a beached ship
> roasting coffee and telling anyone opening the door...
> "there are strange sights
> under the Gulf Coast lights
> but no stranger will
> you ever see
> Than Harmon sitting
> on his closed in porch
> and roasting frozen Kohinoor".
>
> 'pologies to Mr.Service.
>
> Bernie

Robert Service was a bank teller at a Canadian Bank (I believe the Canadian
Imperial Bank of Commerce, or somesuch) in Dawson City, Yukon, while he
wrote some of his "poems." Dawson City was where the Yukon gold rush
occured and was reached by the gold seekers through two different trails
coming up from Southeast Alaska (in the Skagway area). The bank still
exists (or has been rebuilt) and has a plaque denoting Mr. Service's service
there:-)

Back when I used to live in Alaska, I visited Dawson City two or three
times. You can drive there in the summer over not very good and not paved
roads. It is not too far from Whitehorse. Along the way, don't forget to
visit Chicken (a real town, on the Alaska side of the border). Or, you can
fly; there used to be an "airline" that made scheduled service between
Fairbanks, Dawson, and Whitehorse. It flew real, honest to goodness, DC3s.
Last time I flew there would be more than 10 years ago, but hopefully the
airline and the planes are still in service.

ken




   
Date: 23 Jan 2007 20:53:29
From: bernie
Subject: Re: results of 'cold' weather roasting
Ken Fox wrote:
> "bernie" <bdigman@zianet.com> wrote in message
> news:45b64725@nntp.zianet.com...
>
>> Why do I have an image of Harmon sitting in the boiler of a beached ship
>>roasting coffee and telling anyone opening the door...
>> "there are strange sights
>> under the Gulf Coast lights
>> but no stranger will
>> you ever see
>> Than Harmon sitting
>> on his closed in porch
>> and roasting frozen Kohinoor".
>>
>> 'pologies to Mr.Service.
>>
>> Bernie
>
>
> Robert Service was a bank teller at a Canadian Bank (I believe the Canadian
> Imperial Bank of Commerce, or somesuch) in Dawson City, Yukon, while he
> wrote some of his "poems." Dawson City was where the Yukon gold rush
> occured and was reached by the gold seekers through two different trails
> coming up from Southeast Alaska (in the Skagway area). The bank still
> exists (or has been rebuilt) and has a plaque denoting Mr. Service's service
> there:-)
>
> Back when I used to live in Alaska, I visited Dawson City two or three
> times. You can drive there in the summer over not very good and not paved
> roads. It is not too far from Whitehorse. Along the way, don't forget to
> visit Chicken (a real town, on the Alaska side of the border). Or, you can
> fly; there used to be an "airline" that made scheduled service between
> Fairbanks, Dawson, and Whitehorse. It flew real, honest to goodness, DC3s.
> Last time I flew there would be more than 10 years ago, but hopefully the
> airline and the planes are still in service.
>
> ken
>
>
And I believe that Sam Mcgee was a real person who was known to
Robert Service. Service just liked the name. He apparently was a little
miffed when the poem became well known and he didn't get royalties.
Maybe an urban myth.
Bernie


  
Date: 23 Jan 2007 18:10:00
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: Re: results of 'cold' weather roasting
Howdy Bernie!
While the heat from the TC did feel good, it didn't get 'that' warm, nor did
the coffee talk to me. BTW, I didn't think anyone else remembered Robert W
Service?

"Were you ever out in the Great Alone, when the moon was awful clear,
And the icy mountains hemmed you in with a silence you most could HEAR; ..."

That's what it felt like for the half-hour it took to roast that day.
--
Robert (Frosty Stones!) Harmon
http://tinyurl.com/pou2y
http://tinyurl.com/psfob
http://tinyurl.com/fkd6r

"bernie" <bdigman@zianet.com > wrote in message
news:45b64725@nntp.zianet.com...
> Robert Harmon wrote:
>> The weather has been miserable for a few weeks, at least by Texas Gulf
>> Coast standards; rain, wind, & low 30's to mid 40's. I ran out of home
>> roast so decided to brave the elements & broke out the TurboCrazy on the
>> covered back porch.
>
> Why do I have an image of Harmon sitting in the boiler of a beached ship
> roasting coffee and telling anyone opening the door...
> "there are strange sights
> under the Gulf Coast lights
> but no stranger will
> you ever see
> Than Harmon sitting
> on his closed in porch
> and roasting frozen Kohinoor".
>
> 'pologies to Mr.Service.
>
> Bernie




   
Date: 23 Jan 2007 18:56:13
From: The Other Funk
Subject: Re: results of 'cold' weather roasting
Finding the keyboard operational
Robert Harmon entered:

> Howdy Bernie!
> While the heat from the TC did feel good, it didn't get 'that' warm,
> nor did the coffee talk to me. BTW, I didn't think anyone else
> remembered Robert W Service?
>
> "Were you ever out in the Great Alone, when the moon was awful clear,
> And the icy mountains hemmed you in with a silence you most could
> HEAR; ..."
> That's what it felt like for the half-hour it took to roast that day.
>
> "bernie" <bdigman@zianet.com> wrote in message
> news:45b64725@nntp.zianet.com...
>> Robert Harmon wrote:
>>> The weather has been miserable for a few weeks, at least by Texas
>>> Gulf Coast standards; rain, wind, & low 30's to mid 40's. I ran out
>>> of home roast so decided to brave the elements & broke out the
>>> TurboCrazy on the covered back porch.
>>
>> Why do I have an image of Harmon sitting in the boiler of a
>> beached ship roasting coffee and telling anyone opening the door...
>> "there are strange sights
>> under the Gulf Coast lights
>> but no stranger will
>> you ever see
>> Than Harmon sitting
>> on his closed in porch
>> and roasting frozen Kohinoor".
>>
>> 'pologies to Mr.Service.
>>
>> Bernie

Bernie, that is in-freaking-spired. So that makes three of us that recall
Robert Service
Bob
--
--
Coffee worth staying up for - NY Times
www.moondoggiecoffee.com