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Date: 11 Dec 2006 12:16:44
From: news.rcn.com
Subject: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
Just accidentally bought a Gaggia Coffee Espresso which works on 240 volts.
Is it possible to rewire it for 120V please? Or is the transformer
different?

Does anyone know if this would be a major pain in the neck to change or if
there is an exploded view anywhere? I have tried using a reasonably
powerful voltage converter and it blew the fuse immediately!

It is a curious wide, lower-slung very modern all stainless steel unit with
three side-by-side buttons, not the one looking like the Baby shown at
http://www.wholelattelove.com/Gaggia/newcoffee.cfm

I am trying to replace my Baby which endemically cant produce crema or
proper coffee consistently and leaks like a sieve.

(I am hoping these units aren't the same inside but clothed in different
outer casings)






 
Date: 13 Dec 2006 13:13:36
From: daveb
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
the shipping is SO high that most in EU stay away.


dave



 
Date: 12 Dec 2006 23:41:24
From: daveb
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
euro 220 volt plugs don't work in the US.

euro SOCKETS are difficult to obtain.

Then an adapter to fit US 240 volt plug (typically a clothes dryer --
or less likely, an air conditioner) to a euro 220 volt SOCKET would
have to be made. -- (after finding and buying one)

OR -- other more dangerous methods could be explored.

methinks the OP is / has lost interest in the whole thing.

And BTW, 'homer'

a NEW gaggia of this type is about USD 450.00 max, let alone an
unknown UNwarranteed USED one.

dave
188



> "Homer J Simpson" <nobody@nowhere.com> wrote in message
>
> > For an $800 machine? I bloody would find a way to make it work.



  
Date: 13 Dec 2006 17:45:15
From: Homer J Simpson
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?

"daveb" <davebobblane@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1165995684.100815.205780@f1g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

> euro 220 volt plugs don't work in the US.

I'm assuming he will cut off the plug and fit a US 240 V model.

> And BTW, 'homer'
>
> a NEW gaggia of this type is about USD 450.00 max, let alone an
> unknown UNwarranteed USED one.

You don't know how cheap I am.





   
Date: 13 Dec 2006 14:27:34
From: news.rcn.com
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?

"Homer J Simpson" <nobody@nowhere.com > wrote in message
news:L_Wfh.63424$YV4.28011@edtnps89...
>
> "daveb" <davebobblane@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1165995684.100815.205780@f1g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
>> euro 220 volt plugs don't work in the US.
>
> I'm assuming he will cut off the plug and fit a US 240 V model.
>
>> And BTW, 'homer'
>>
>> a NEW gaggia of this type is about USD 450.00 max, let alone an
>> unknown UNwarranteed USED one.
>
> You don't know how cheap I am.

Hey guys, you don't know how cheap I am!!

After all I am the one who paid virtually nothing for it in the first place!

BTW this machine has a common triangular female plug in a hole in the back
where you can insert ANY power cable from ANY other device, especially any
desktop computer power supply. (It is the simple one which isn't the figure
8 one or the bunny ears one) And I have already said that I do have a 1500
watt transformer in my living room as well as that unusual Spanish-looking
208v A/C socket. i am perfectly prepared to test this thing out.

What I don't see happening is anyone bidding from Europe who is prepared to
pay shipping on it to outside the US???




    
Date: 14 Dec 2006 09:55:29
From: M Berger
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
You don't have to sell it to someone in Europe. There are
plenty of US residents that have 220 volts available.

news.rcn.com wrote:
>
> BTW this machine has a common triangular female plug in a hole in the back
> where you can insert ANY power cable from ANY other device, especially any
> desktop computer power supply. (It is the simple one which isn't the figure
> 8 one or the bunny ears one) And I have already said that I do have a 1500
> watt transformer in my living room as well as that unusual Spanish-looking
> 208v A/C socket. i am perfectly prepared to test this thing out.
>
> What I don't see happening is anyone bidding from Europe who is prepared to
> pay shipping on it to outside the US???
>
>


     
Date: 14 Dec 2006 15:44:18
From: daveblows
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
M Berger <berger@shout.net > wrote in
news:elrs5h$so9$1@roundup.shout.net:

> You don't have to sell it to someone in Europe. There are
> plenty of US residents that have 220 volts available.
>
> news.rcn.com wrote:
>>
>> BTW this machine has a common triangular female plug in a hole in the
>> back where you can insert ANY power cable from ANY other device,
>> especially any desktop computer power supply. (It is the simple one
>> which isn't the figure 8 one or the bunny ears one) And I have
>> already said that I do have a 1500 watt transformer in my living room
>> as well as that unusual Spanish-looking 208v A/C socket. i am
>> perfectly prepared to test this thing out.
>>
>> What I don't see happening is anyone bidding from Europe who is
>> prepared to pay shipping on it to outside the US???
>>
>>
>

Or aren't afraid to do the power conversion themself.

Robert (It really is a piece of cake @$60 - 70.) Harmon

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com



 
Date: 12 Dec 2006 16:42:30
From: daveb
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
yes. I agree.


there are quick mills and Isomacs and Gaggias and ???? with pids too.



(There's more to espresso than a [deleted] Silvia w/PID.)Harmon



 
Date: 12 Dec 2006 12:27:35
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
Is that because you're a one-trick pony, dude? Or is that because you
can't see a way to insert your typical PID self-promotion into this
thread? This is an easy conversion, easy enough that you might be up to
the task yourself.

Robert (There's more to espresso than a stinking Silvia w/PID.)Harmon


daveb wrote:
> this whole project is NOT a good idea.
>
> I would never undertake this for myself or a customer, period.
>
>
> Dave
> 186
> www.hitechespresso.com



 
Date: 12 Dec 2006 10:53:46
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: Re: Thanks for the advice guys BUT in any event: The 120v pump will cost $40 - $75
That should've read;
> The crema will be the same IF both machines are in good order. They use the
> same heating elements & boilers. So, based on that I'd say it's not worth
> doing.

Robert

Robert Harmon wrote:
> "news.rcn.com" <news.rnc.com> wrote in
> news:C-ednQ0YOv6IWePYnZ2dnUVZ_oqmnZ2d@rcn.net:
>
> > What I am wondering is whether this is worth either the effort or the
> > cost. And no one seems to have an opinion on whether the end result
> > will be any better than my Baby, which despite having been rebuilt by
> > Importika endemically cant produce crema. (I suppose I can live with
> > all the leaking their repair has caused which they wont recitfy)
> >
> >
>
> The steam will be the same IF both machines are in good order. They use the
> same heating elements & boilers. So, based on that I'd say it's not worth
> doing.
>
> Robert (duck & cover) Harmon
> --
> http://tinyurl.com/pou2y
> http://tinyurl.com/fkd6r
> Remove "Z" to reply via email.



  
Date: 12 Dec 2006 14:14:02
From: news.rcn.com
Subject: Re: Thanks for the advice guys BUT in any event: The 120v pump will cost $40 - $75

"Robert Harmon" <r_h_harmon@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:1165949626.495030.38260@j44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> That should've read;
>> The crema will be the same IF both machines are in good order. They use
>> the
>> same heating elements & boilers. So, based on that I'd say it's not worth
>> doing.
I suspected as much but this machine seemed so alluring
> Robert
>
> Robert Harmon wrote:
>> "news.rcn.com" <news.rnc.com> wrote in
>> news:C-ednQ0YOv6IWePYnZ2dnUVZ_oqmnZ2d@rcn.net:
>>
>> > What I am wondering is whether this is worth either the effort or the
>> > cost. And no one seems to have an opinion on whether the end result
>> > will be any better than my Baby, which despite having been rebuilt by
>> > Importika endemically cant produce crema. (I suppose I can live with
>> > all the leaking their repair has caused which they wont recitfy)
>> >
>> >
>>
>> The steam will be the same IF both machines are in good order. They use
>> the
>> same heating elements & boilers. So, based on that I'd say it's not worth
>> doing.
>>
>> Robert (duck & cover) Harmon
>> --
>> http://tinyurl.com/pou2y
>> http://tinyurl.com/fkd6r
>> Remove "Z" to reply via email.
>




   
Date: 12 Dec 2006 21:08:17
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: Re: Thanks for the advice guys BUT in any event: The 120v pump will cost $40 - $75
"news.rcn.com" <news.rnc.com > wrote in
news:xZGdnfWo25kVYuPYnZ2dnUVZ_qemnZ2d@rcn.net:

>
> "Robert Harmon" <r_h_harmon@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1165949626.495030.38260@j44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>> That should've read;
>>> The crema will be the same IF both machines are in good order. They
>>> use the
>>> same heating elements & boilers. So, based on that I'd say it's not
>>> worth doing.
> I suspected as much but this machine seemed so alluring
>> Robert
>>
>> Robert Harmon wrote:
>>> "news.rcn.com" <news.rnc.com> wrote in
>>> news:C-ednQ0YOv6IWePYnZ2dnUVZ_oqmnZ2d@rcn.net:
>>>
>>> > What I am wondering is whether this is worth either the effort or
>>> > the cost. And no one seems to have an opinion on whether the end
>>> > result will be any better than my Baby, which despite having been
>>> > rebuilt by Importika endemically cant produce crema. (I suppose I
>>> > can live with all the leaking their repair has caused which they
>>> > wont recitfy)
>>> >
>>> >
>>>
>>> The steam will be the same IF both machines are in good order. They
>>> use the
>>> same heating elements & boilers. So, based on that I'd say it's not
>>> worth doing.
>>>
>>> Robert (duck & cover) Harmon
>>> --
>>> http://tinyurl.com/pou2y
>>> http://tinyurl.com/fkd6r
>>> Remove "Z" to reply via email.
>>
>
>
>

Sell it on eBay & get your money back. Be sure to note that it's 240v.

Robert (duck & cover) Harmon
--
http://tinyurl.com/pou2y
http://tinyurl.com/fkd6r
Remove "Z" to reply via email.


 
Date: 12 Dec 2006 11:18:03
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?

"news.rcn.com" <news.rnc.com > wrote in message
news:4vudna8TKIkfD-DYnZ2dnUVZ_ruknZ2d@rcn.net...
>
> I am trying to replace my Baby which endemically cant produce crema or
> proper coffee consistently and leaks like a sieve.
>
What sort of grinder are you using? Where do the leaks come from?




> (I am hoping these units aren't the same inside but clothed in different
> outer casings)

Uh, oh, they are - almost all the Gaggias use the same boiler. The only
difference is the casing and whether or not they have a 3-way solenoid which
allows you to remove the PF immediately without getting sprayed by residual
pressure.


>




  
Date: 12 Dec 2006 11:43:41
From: news.rcn.com
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
I am using a LaPavoni burr grinder and this total failure to produce crema
has only occurred over the last few months. I even tried buying some
supposedly expensive coffee as an experiment to see if it helped. (from a
shop called Starbucks, their house blend which I figured probably wasn't
stale on grounds of continuous purchasers by obviously affluent frequenters
of this establishment? As a general comment, even on finest grind, it seems
exceptionally weak?)

It doesn't seem to be anything to do with temperature as I can see steam
rising from what is in the cup. The Baby seems to take about ten to fifteen
minutes to heat up on first use. Four to five minutes thereafter. I have
seen references to it heating up in 90 seconds and have taken this to be a
false claim by the importer who was the one who serviced this unit a few
times until both I got sick of sending it back to them and they got sick of
returning my calls on why it doesn't seem to work properly.

The leaks come out of three main areas: When I pour the water in and it goes
too high in the water chamber. Where the hole is at the front centre of that
chamber, feeding straight into the underside of the water/coffee collector,
between it and the frame and occasionally as a wheeze out of somewhere near
where the portafilter is.

(My comments on whether it is worth the bother trying to rewire it unless it
is an easy re-connection job and spend money on it relate to this experience
with Gaggia units as well)

"Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net > wrote in message
news:heWdnQL_eYqhS-PYnZ2dnUVZ_oipnZ2d@comcast.com...
>
> "news.rcn.com" <news.rnc.com> wrote in message
> news:4vudna8TKIkfD-DYnZ2dnUVZ_ruknZ2d@rcn.net...
>>
>> I am trying to replace my Baby which endemically cant produce crema or
>> proper coffee consistently and leaks like a sieve.
>>
> What sort of grinder are you using? Where do the leaks come from?
>
>
>
>
>> (I am hoping these units aren't the same inside but clothed in different
>> outer casings)
>
> Uh, oh, they are - almost all the Gaggias use the same boiler. The only
> difference is the casing and whether or not they have a 3-way solenoid
> which allows you to remove the PF immediately without getting sprayed by
> residual pressure.
>
>
>>
>
>




   
Date: 12 Dec 2006 13:31:45
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
I love the formulation - it sounds so veddy British and
understated/oblivious. "Oh yes, there are these fellows who call themselves
Starbucks. Perhaps you may have heard of them."

I've spent the last 30 years on a desert island so I have no idea who those
Starbucks fellows are.



"news.rcn.com" <news.rnc.com > wrote in message
news:FaidnVvPZIUwQePYnZ2dnUVZ_s2vnZ2d@rcn.net...
I even tried buying some
> supposedly expensive coffee as an experiment to see if it helped. (from a
> shop called Starbucks,




 
Date: 11 Dec 2006 23:06:48
From: daveb
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
this whole project is NOT a good idea.

I would never undertake this for myself or a customer, period.


Dave
186
www.hitechespresso.com



  
Date: 13 Dec 2006 02:50:56
From: Homer J Simpson
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?

"daveb" <davebobblane@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1165907208.892679.289210@f1g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

> this whole project is NOT a good idea.
>
> I would never undertake this for myself or a customer, period.

For an $800 machine? I bloody would find a way to make it work.







   
Date: 13 Dec 2006 14:29:57
From: news.rcn.com
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?

"Homer J Simpson" <nobody@nowhere.com > wrote in message
news:kUJfh.61035$YV4.16256@edtnps89...
>
> "daveb" <davebobblane@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1165907208.892679.289210@f1g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
>> this whole project is NOT a good idea.
>>
>> I would never undertake this for myself or a customer, period.
>
> For an $800 machine? I bloody would find a way to make it work.
(not if you were thinking of it as a replacement for a Baby and were
wondering if there was any acutal difference between the two, - when there
apparently isn't)




   
Date: 13 Dec 2006 03:08:05
From: Alan
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?

"Homer J Simpson" <nobody@nowhere.com > wrote in message
news:kUJfh.61035$YV4.16256@edtnps89...
>
> "daveb" <davebobblane@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1165907208.892679.289210@f1g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
>> this whole project is NOT a good idea.
>>
>> I would never undertake this for myself or a customer, period.
>
> For an $800 machine? I bloody would find a way to make it work.

why not first plug it into a 220 outlet (I'm sure you've got one somewhere
in your house) and see if the machine even works, before you contemplate
rewiring or running 220 to your kitchen counter?




    
Date: 13 Dec 2006 03:15:32
From: Homer J Simpson
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?

"Alan" <in_flagrante@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:p8Kfh.7359$Ga1.5290@newssvr12.news.prodigy.net...

>>> I would never undertake this for myself or a customer, period.
>>
>> For an $800 machine? I bloody would find a way to make it work.
>
> why not first plug it into a 220 outlet (I'm sure you've got one somewhere
> in your house) and see if the machine even works, before you contemplate
> rewiring or running 220 to your kitchen counter?

That'd be my first try out.





  
Date: 12 Dec 2006 09:59:46
From: news.rcn.com
Subject: Re: Thanks for the advice guys BUT in any event: The 120v pump will cost $40 - $75

"daveb" <davebobblane@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1165907208.892679.289210@f1g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> this whole project is NOT a good idea.
>
> I would never undertake this for myself or a customer, period.

What I am wondering is whether this is worth either the effort or the cost.
And no one seems to have an opinion on whether the end result will be any
better than my Baby, which despite having been rebuilt by Importika
endemically cant produce crema. (I suppose I can live with all the leaking
their repair has caused which they wont recitfy)



>
>
> Dave
> 186
> www.hitechespresso.com
>




   
Date: 12 Dec 2006 19:49:01
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: Re: Thanks for the advice guys BUT in any event: The 120v pump will cost $40 - $75
"news.rcn.com" <news.rnc.com > wrote in
news:C-ednQ0YOv6IWePYnZ2dnUVZ_oqmnZ2d@rcn.net:

> What I am wondering is whether this is worth either the effort or the
> cost. And no one seems to have an opinion on whether the end result
> will be any better than my Baby, which despite having been rebuilt by
> Importika endemically cant produce crema. (I suppose I can live with
> all the leaking their repair has caused which they wont recitfy)
>
>

The steam will be the same IF both machines are in good order. They use the
same heating elements & boilers. So, based on that I'd say it's not worth
doing.

Robert (duck & cover) Harmon
--
http://tinyurl.com/pou2y
http://tinyurl.com/fkd6r
Remove "Z" to reply via email.


 
Date: 12 Dec 2006 00:13:31
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
"news.rcn.com" <news.rnc.com > wrote in
news:4vudna8TKIkfD-DYnZ2dnUVZ_ruknZ2d@rcn.net:

> Just accidentally bought a Gaggia Coffee Espresso which works on 240
> volts. Is it possible to rewire it for 120V please? Or is the
> transformer different?
>
> Does anyone know if this would be a major pain in the neck to change
> or if there is an exploded view anywhere? I have tried using a
> reasonably powerful voltage converter and it blew the fuse
> immediately!
>
> It is a curious wide, lower-slung very modern all stainless steel unit
> with three side-by-side buttons, not the one looking like the Baby
> shown at http://www.wholelattelove.com/Gaggia/newcoffee.cfm
>
> I am trying to replace my Baby which endemically cant produce crema or
> proper coffee consistently and leaks like a sieve.
>
> (I am hoping these units aren't the same inside but clothed in
> different outer casings)
>
>

I'll need more info before I can give an answer. What kind of upper boiler
is in your machine; the old type with heat element attachments on the side
or the four attachments on top? Does you machine have a 3-way solenoid
valve?

If you have the newer boiler top the elements can be rewired (the same
elements are used in all voltage). You'll still need a 110 volt pump &
solenoid valve (if so equipped).

I've converted several Gaggia from 240 to 110 volt & if you can read a
wiring schematic it's a piece of cake.

Robert (Let 'em eat cake!) Harmon
--
http://tinyurl.com/pou2y
http://tinyurl.com/fkd6r
Remove "Z" to reply via email.


  
Date: 11 Dec 2006 21:34:58
From: news.rcn.com
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?

"Robert Harmon" <r_h_harmon@Zhotmail.com > wrote in message
news:Xns9896AF3E69D2CrhharmonZhotmailcom@194.177.96.26...

> I'll need more info before I can give an answer. What kind of upper boiler
> is in your machine; the old type with heat element attachments on the side
> or the four attachments on top? Does you machine have a 3-way solenoid
> valve?
How do I get it apart to see which one it is? It looks brand new and unused
and is the one in the picture at
http://www.everythingkitchens.com/gaggia-classic-espresso-14101-14100.html
as opposed to the one with the three vertical switches on the left: Does
this assist?
> If you have the newer boiler top the elements can be rewired (the same
> elements are used in all voltage). You'll still need a 110 volt pump &
> solenoid valve (if so equipped).
How do I identify whether I have such a pump and solenoid and how is it
rewired please?
>
> I've converted several Gaggia from 240 to 110 volt & if you can read a
> wiring schematic it's a piece of cake.
I can't but isn't it a matter of disconnecting and reconnecting in-place
connections if I have the right type?
>
> Robert (Let 'em eat cake!) Harmon
> --
> http://tinyurl.com/pou2y
> http://tinyurl.com/fkd6r
> Remove "Z" to reply via email.




   
Date: 12 Dec 2006 03:02:14
From: daveblows
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
"news.rcn.com" <news.rnc.com > wrote in
news:1OKdnaMjhvLjiOPYnZ2dnUVZ_tijnZ2d@rcn.net:

>
> "Robert Harmon" <r_h_harmon@Zhotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:Xns9896AF3E69D2CrhharmonZhotmailcom@194.177.96.26...
>
>> I'll need more info before I can give an answer. What kind of upper
>> boiler is in your machine; the old type with heat element attachments
>> on the side or the four attachments on top? Does you machine have a
>> 3-way solenoid valve?
> How do I get it apart to see which one it is? It looks brand new and
> unused and is the one in the picture at
> http://www.everythingkitchens.com/gaggia-classic-espresso-14101-14100.h
> tml as opposed to the one with the three vertical switches on the
> left: Does this assist?
>> If you have the newer boiler top the elements can be rewired (the
>> same elements are used in all voltage). You'll still need a 110 volt
>> pump & solenoid valve (if so equipped).
> How do I identify whether I have such a pump and solenoid and how is
> it rewired please?
>>
>> I've converted several Gaggia from 240 to 110 volt & if you can read
>> a wiring schematic it's a piece of cake.
> I can't but isn't it a matter of disconnecting and reconnecting
> in-place connections if I have the right type?
>>
>> Robert (Let 'em eat cake!) Harmon
>> --
>> http://tinyurl.com/pou2y
>> http://tinyurl.com/fkd6r
>> Remove "Z" to reply via email.
>
>
>

My best advice; if you're not comfortable doing the conversion have
someone else do it.

That said: Open the Gaggia by removing the four screws on the top of the
machine & lifting off the top.

Some Gaggia Coffee machines have this boiler: http://tinyurl.com/yfkaqg
If you have this boiler I can't help you.

Some Gaggia Coffee machines have this boiler: http://tinyurl.com/yd7fxk
If you have this boiler here's the schematic for wiring it to 120 volt.
Schematic: http://tinyurl.com/volsg

The 120v pump will cost $40 - $75 depending on whose advice you listen
to. I recommend the cheapest Ulka from partsguru.com. The lower the
wattage the quieter it will be.

The 3-way solenoid is only found in the Classic & Baby machines. Ifyour
machine has such a valve there will be a chrome tube to the left of the
brew group. If you don't have this, great! You've just saved $50 - $75.
If you machine is equipped with the valve you'll need to replace the coil
only - that's the square or round part similar to the blue 3-way valve
shown in the first link above.

As far as rewiring it goes, I was very serious about not trying this
yourself if you're not comfortable with it. Gather all the parts;
machine, new pump & solenoid valve, & take everything to a reputable
appliance repair shop. Most will do the wiring for $50 - $100, but no
warranty.

Good luck, and keep us posted.

Robert

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com



 
Date: 11 Dec 2006 14:24:45
From: Meat Plow
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
On Mon, 11 Dec 2006 12:16:44 -0500, news.rcn.com Has Frothed:

> Just accidentally bought a Gaggia Coffee Espresso which works on 240 volts.
> Is it possible to rewire it for 120V please? Or is the transformer
> different?

Easy enought to run 240 volts outlet, not easy to rework the coffee
machine for 120. Is this device 50 hertz also? Can't you return it and get
one made to work on 120?

?????????

--
Pierre Salinger Memorial Hook, Line & Sinker, June 2004

COOSN-266-06-25794


  
Date: 11 Dec 2006 14:42:34
From: news.rcn.com
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?

"Meat Plow" <meat@meatplow.local > wrote in message
news:pan.2006.12.11.19.24.44.787000@nntp.sun-meatplow.local...
> On Mon, 11 Dec 2006 12:16:44 -0500, news.rcn.com Has Frothed:
>
>> Just accidentally bought a Gaggia Coffee Espresso which works on 240
>> volts.
>> Is it possible to rewire it for 120V please? Or is the transformer
>> different?
>
> Easy enought to run 240 volts outlet, not easy to rework the coffee
> machine for 120. Is this device 50 hertz also? Can't you return it and get
> one made to work on 120?
Picked it up at a flea ket for virtually nothing 'cos I saw it in what
looked like mint condition. Didn't notice voltage. Unlikely the vendor knew
about voltage. I bought it from him just after he had bought it from
someone else. I suppose I must take it to England next time I go and put it
on Craigslist. Inconceivable it can be worthwhile shipping it to Europe from
US so outlets like EBay out of the question, unless this unit is REALLY
worth nine hundred bucks!
http://www.everythingkitchens.com/gaggia-classic-espresso-14101-14100.html

>
> ?????????
>
> --
> Pierre Salinger Memorial Hook, Line & Sinker, June 2004
>
> COOSN-266-06-25794




   
Date: 12 Dec 2006 03:31:11
From: James Sweet
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?

>
> Picked it up at a flea ket for virtually nothing 'cos I saw it in what
> looked like mint condition. Didn't notice voltage. Unlikely the vendor knew
> about voltage. I bought it from him just after he had bought it from
> someone else. I suppose I must take it to England next time I go and put it
> on Craigslist. Inconceivable it can be worthwhile shipping it to Europe from
> US so outlets like EBay out of the question, unless this unit is REALLY
> worth nine hundred bucks!
> http://www.everythingkitchens.com/gaggia-classic-espresso-14101-14100.html
>

Why don't you just install a 240V receptacle in your kitchen?


    
Date: 12 Dec 2006 17:08:22
From: Michael Kennedy
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
Yeah its easy enough, especially if you feel that you had the skill to
rewire the coffe maker for 120v.

- Mike


"James Sweet" <jamessweet@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:3opfh.1677$HX4.1041@trnddc03...
>
>>
>> Picked it up at a flea ket for virtually nothing 'cos I saw it in what
>> looked like mint condition. Didn't notice voltage. Unlikely the vendor
>> knew about voltage. I bought it from him just after he had bought it
>> from someone else. I suppose I must take it to England next time I go and
>> put it on Craigslist. Inconceivable it can be worthwhile shipping it to
>> Europe from US so outlets like EBay out of the question, unless this unit
>> is REALLY worth nine hundred bucks!
>> http://www.everythingkitchens.com/gaggia-classic-espresso-14101-14100.html
>>
>
> Why don't you just install a 240V receptacle in your kitchen?




 
Date: 11 Dec 2006 13:44:47
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
You would have to replace the heating element (which is integrated into the
top of the boiler) and the pump which would not be economical.

If you buy a proper step up transformer rated at 1500 or 2000 watts and use
it on a circuit of the proper rating (at least 15 amps) and without any
other loads on the circuit it should work. A transformer of this size is not
like the little travel converters - it weighs around 30 lbs. and costs
around $75, roughly.

Or you could have an electrician install a 240 v circuit. If you have an
electric range or clothes dryer you already have 240V in your
kitchen/laundry and every home/ apartment has it coming into their panel
box.






"news.rcn.com" <news.rnc.com > wrote in message
news:4vudna8TKIkfD-DYnZ2dnUVZ_ruknZ2d@rcn.net...
> Just accidentally bought a Gaggia Coffee Espresso which works on 240
> volts. Is it possible to rewire it for 120V please? Or is the transformer
> different?
>
> Does anyone know if this would be a major pain in the neck to change or if
> there is an exploded view anywhere? I have tried using a reasonably
> powerful voltage converter and it blew the fuse immediately!
>
> It is a curious wide, lower-slung very modern all stainless steel unit
> with three side-by-side buttons, not the one looking like the Baby shown
> at http://www.wholelattelove.com/Gaggia/newcoffee.cfm
>
> I am trying to replace my Baby which endemically cant produce crema or
> proper coffee consistently and leaks like a sieve.
>
> (I am hoping these units aren't the same inside but clothed in different
> outer casings)
>




  
Date: 11 Dec 2006 19:41:44
From: Jim Land
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
"Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net > wrote in
news:GNadnbRUkvu9OuDYnZ2dnUVZ_revnZ2d@comcast.com:

> If you have an
> electric range or clothes dryer you already have 240V in your
> kitchen/laundry and every home/ apartment has it coming into their
> panel box.
>

1. Cut the plug off the cord.

2. Install 240V plug like the one on your dryer.

3. Make your coffee in the laundry room.


   
Date: 11 Dec 2006 23:23:06
From: Jim Land
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
Jim Land <RrrrFfffTttt(NO)@(SPAM)hotmail.com > wrote in
news:Xns98968B51FD245RrrrFfffTttt4396hotm@216.168.3.44:

> 1. Cut the plug off the cord.
>
> 2. Install 240V plug like the one on your dryer.
>
> 3. Make your coffee in the laundry room.

Revised, after learning that you have a 240v air conditioner in the
living room:

1. Cut the plug off the cord.

2. Install 240V plug like the one on your air conditioner.

3. Make your coffee in the living room.


    
Date: 12 Dec 2006 17:05:50
From: Michael Kennedy
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?

1. Cut the plug off the cord.

2. Install 240V plug like the one on your stove.

3. Make your coffee in the kitchen.




  
Date: 11 Dec 2006 19:00:07
From: Homer J Simpson
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?

"Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net > wrote in message
news:GNadnbRUkvu9OuDYnZ2dnUVZ_revnZ2d@comcast.com...
> You would have to replace the heating element (which is integrated into
> the top of the boiler) and the pump which would not be economical.
>
> If you buy a proper step up transformer rated at 1500 or 2000 watts and
> use it on a circuit of the proper rating (at least 15 amps) and without
> any other loads on the circuit it should work. A transformer of this size
> is not like the little travel converters - it weighs around 30 lbs. and
> costs around $75, roughly.
>
> Or you could have an electrician install a 240 v circuit. If you have an
> electric range or clothes dryer you already have 240V in your
> kitchen/laundry and every home/ apartment has it coming into their panel
> box.

You could add a 208 / 220 circuit to the kitchen. Most kitchen receptacles
are split 240 - a voltmeter from hot to hot will show this.

>>>>>>> DON'T <<<<<<< try to cheat with two plugs - this is a fool killer.
>>>>>>> You COULD (I suppose) wire a cable to one of those 2 to 6 outlet
>>>>>>> adaptors and get the voltage that way (I've contemplated that).

Are you sure it isn't 50 cycle?







   
Date: 11 Dec 2006 19:30:11
From: Geoffrey S. Mendelson
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
Homer J Simpson wrote:
> Are you sure it isn't 50 cycle?

Most likely it's 230 volts 50 Hz (cycle). I think the only country in the
world with standard outlets being 240 volts is Australia, and I'm not
sure about that.

England standardized on 240 volts, Europe on 220. Israel on 230 so you
could use either. Since then all of the E.U. has standardized to 230,
the U.K going down, the rest of Europe going up.

Unless it has a timer in it, it will work just as well on 240v/60 Hz, from
a U.S. outlet. Probably a lot better than trying to get a transformer to
convert the voltage up. A coffee maker generally uses 1500 watts, and
a home transformer loses about 15%-20% in the process of converting it.

If you want a really good home machine look at the Sunbeam line. I don't
know if they are sold in the U.S. There was a TV series called "Living
Coffee" by Paul Basset (or Bassett, I'm not sure), which was done by
the Austrailian Broadcasting Company and shown on food networks in the
U.S.

He won an award for being the best "barista" (coffee maker at an espresso bar)
and worked with Sunbeam on the design of their machines and keting them.

Geoff.

--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel gsm@mendelson.com N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 Fax ONLY: 972-2-648-1443 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/


    
Date: 12 Dec 2006 03:28:56
From: James Sweet
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:
> Homer J Simpson wrote:
>
>>Are you sure it isn't 50 cycle?
>
>
> Most likely it's 230 volts 50 Hz (cycle). I think the only country in the
> world with standard outlets being 240 volts is Australia, and I'm not
> sure about that.
>
> England standardized on 240 volts, Europe on 220. Israel on 230 so you
> could use either. Since then all of the E.U. has standardized to 230,
> the U.K going down, the rest of Europe going up.
>
>

Regardless of the standard, my friend in England had a voltage monitor
set up for a while and it had pretty large fluctuations, anything from
around 223 all the way up to 245V depending on the time of day. These
small percentages don't matter for most things.


    
Date: 11 Dec 2006 14:43:02
From: Meat Plow
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
On Mon, 11 Dec 2006 19:30:11 +0000, Geoffrey S. Mendelson Has Frothed:

> Homer J Simpson wrote:
>> Are you sure it isn't 50 cycle?
>
> Most likely it's 230 volts 50 Hz (cycle). I think the only country in the
> world with standard outlets being 240 volts is Australia, and I'm not
> sure about that.
>
> England standardized on 240 volts, Europe on 220. Israel on 230 so you
> could use either. Since then all of the E.U. has standardized to 230,
> the U.K going down, the rest of Europe going up.
>
> Unless it has a timer in it, it will work just as well on 240v/60 Hz, from
> a U.S. outlet. Probably a lot better than trying to get a transformer to
> convert the voltage up. A coffee maker generally uses 1500 watts, and
> a home transformer loses about 15%-20% in the process of converting it.
>
> If you want a really good home machine look at the Sunbeam line. I don't
> know if they are sold in the U.S. There was a TV series called "Living
> Coffee" by Paul Basset (or Bassett, I'm not sure), which was done by
> the Austrailian Broadcasting Company and shown on food networks in the
> U.S.
>
> He won an award for being the best "barista" (coffee maker at an espresso bar)
> and worked with Sunbeam on the design of their machines and keting them.
>
> Geoff.

I have a Saeco Italia:
http://www.wholelattelove.com/outlet/products/italia.cfm?cid=2
It's the best home unit money can buy.


--
Pierre Salinger Memorial Hook, Line & Sinker, June 2004

COOSN-266-06-25794


   
Date: 11 Dec 2006 14:08:45
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?

"Homer J Simpson" <nobody@nowhere.com > wrote in message
news:XUhfh.57883$rv4.10823@edtnps90...
>>
> You could add a 208 / 220 circuit to the kitchen. Most kitchen receptacles
> are split 240 - a voltmeter from hot to hot will show this.

Some are, some ain't - depends on how old the kitchen is and the
electrician's custoy way of wiring.


>
>>>>>>>> DON'T <<<<<<< try to cheat with two plugs - this is a fool killer.

As long as you stay away from the prongs of the 2nd plug after you plug in
the first you should be ok. That's a big if.


>>>>>>>> You COULD (I suppose) wire a cable to one of those 2 to 6 outlet
>>>>>>>> adaptors and get the voltage that way (I've contemplated that).
>
> Are you sure it isn't 50 cycle?


Wouldn't make any difference - 50 hz. machines will run just fine on 60 hz.
and vice versa - the slight difference in speed does not affect the
performance significantly.


>
>
>
>
>




    
Date: 11 Dec 2006 14:35:28
From: news.rcn.com
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?

"Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net > wrote in message
news:bpidnUZc5rEjMeDYnZ2dnUVZ_veinZ2d@comcast.com...
>
> "Homer J Simpson" <nobody@nowhere.com> wrote in message
> news:XUhfh.57883$rv4.10823@edtnps90...
>>>
>> You could add a 208 / 220 circuit to the kitchen. Most kitchen
>> receptacles are split 240 - a voltmeter from hot to hot will show this.
My problem is that whichever of these options I use will be exceptionally
unsightly in my tiny kitchen which has already-over used power sockets: Is
there any way of arranging joining up the circuits so that this wouldn't be
unsightly?

BTW all sockets on the circuit to the kitchen are the same as all sockets
all around the living room and bedroom. Maybe they aren't 208? (this is
something I have been complaining about ever since we moved in: Every time
we try to turn the microwave on, all lights, televisions, computers etc go
off all over the flat as the fuse trips!

There is a possibility that the cooker has a 208 volt supply somewhere near
it: The building does have 208v at the A/C units at the OTHER end of the
living room.

I DO have one of those transformers but again it is huge and there is
nowhere in the kitchen to put it. The alternative is to put the espresso
unit somewhere near the transformer in the living room but as this would be
nowhere near the water supply, this is also impractical.

Is there really any difference between this unit and a Baby?
>
> Some are, some ain't - depends on how old the kitchen is and the
> electrician's custoy way of wiring.
>
>
>>
>>>>>>>>> DON'T <<<<<<< try to cheat with two plugs - this is a fool killer.
>
> As long as you stay away from the prongs of the 2nd plug after you plug in
> the first you should be ok. That's a big if.
>
>
>>>>>>>>> You COULD (I suppose) wire a cable to one of those 2 to 6 outlet
>>>>>>>>> adaptors and get the voltage that way (I've contemplated that).
>>
>> Are you sure it isn't 50 cycle?
>
>
> Wouldn't make any difference - 50 hz. machines will run just fine on 60
> hz. and vice versa - the slight difference in speed does not affect the
> performance significantly.
>
>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>




     
Date: 11 Dec 2006 16:09:40
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: re-wiring Gaggia Coffee Espresso?
It sounds like the wiring in your building is very old and undersized.
Probably a 120V Gaggia would trip the breakers also. If you have a 240V A/C
outlet in your apartment but it's in the wrong place, an inexpensive
solution would be to get a long extension cord. Based on what you describe,
I really doubt that you have 240V service in your kitchen now unless there
is an electric stove.





"news.rcn.com" <news.rnc.com > wrote in message
news:NPidnSmg96abLuDYnZ2dnUVZ_oCmnZ2d@rcn.net...
>
>
>
> BTW all sockets on the circuit to the kitchen are the same as all sockets
> all around the living room and bedroom. Maybe they aren't 208? (this is
> something I have been complaining about ever since we moved in: Every time
> we try to turn the microwave on, all lights, televisions, computers etc go
> off all over the flat as the fuse trips!
>>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>