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Date: 22 Dec 2006 10:04:08
From: shane
Subject: stainless shot pitchers?
What is it with coffee shops insistance on using stainless steel shot
pichers? I can see using them when making a latte for a togo cup that
doesn't fit under the spout. Most of the time when I order an espresso
it is made into a stainless cup and them dumped into a demitass cup.

Most of the time the PBTC has no clue why they are doing anything and
have been trained to use the stainless shot pitchers. They usually
give me a look of puzzlement when I ask about it, like it can't be done
any other way.

Shane





 
Date: 26 Dec 2006 14:21:41
From: shane
Subject: Re: stainless shot pitchers?
I don't know. It is puzzling to me. I watched someone try to stick a
coffee mug under the spout of an espresso machine this weekend and it
didn't seem to fit. It was a late model La Cimbali machine. I am not
sure what model.

I make as close to proper Italian drinks at home as I can.
One of these days, I may need to take a trip over to Italy and sample
what things are supposed to like.

Shane



Danny wrote:
> shane wrote:
> > It seem to be the typical US style mug. 8-12 oz. Most coffee places
> > use disposable cups, and those are too tall as well.
> > Accepted milk ratio? Another whole can of worms :) I have an even
> > harder time getting the right ratio. I often opt for "machiatos"
> > which as made by the local shops around me, are closer to the
> > traditional Italian proportions of milk for a cappucino or latte.
> > These do have the advantage of being priced lower too..
> >
>
> Both my 10 & 12oz take away cups fit under the standard height group.
> Newer machines have raised groups for this purpose, so I would doubt
> that is the reason for using the pitchers. My machiato is the
> "correct" one - ked with a dash of steamed foam. My cappa and
> lattes are 1/3 espresso, or weaker if the customer desires, which a
> lot do. I have a special order for regulars - they know to order an
> "italian strength" cappa or latte if they prefer a stronger drink, and
> we don't charge for extra shots, for this reason :)
>
>
> --
> Regards, Danny
>
> http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
> http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/EU ordering for Malabar Gold blend)



  
Date: 27 Dec 2006 07:57:41
From: Danny
Subject: Re: stainless shot pitchers?
shane wrote:
> I don't know. It is puzzling to me. I watched someone try to stick a
> coffee mug under the spout of an espresso machine this weekend and it
> didn't seem to fit. It was a late model La Cimbali machine. I am not
> sure what model.

The only problem I have there is that you have to angle the mug to get
it under the spouts (on my machines), which precludes pouring the shot
on top of the water for an americano.

>
> I make as close to proper Italian drinks at home as I can.
> One of these days, I may need to take a trip over to Italy and sample
> what things are supposed to like.

Apart from the usual 1/3 espresso in cappas "mantra", you'd be
surprised at just how small they like their espressii these days. I
haven't been to Italy for a few years, but my Italian customers want
really short shots. When I was there they didn't seem to favour
microfoam, so sometimes it's better not to try and be too close to the
Italian standard (which could also include perhaps more robusta in the
blend than we might like).


--
Regards, Danny

http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/EU ordering for Malabar Gold blend)



 
Date: 26 Dec 2006 09:41:40
From: shane
Subject: Re: stainless shot pitchers?
It seem to be the typical US style mug. 8-12 oz. Most coffee places
use disposable cups, and those are too tall as well.
Accepted milk ratio? Another whole can of worms :) I have an even
harder time getting the right ratio. I often opt for "machiatos"
which as made by the local shops around me, are closer to the
traditional Italian proportions of milk for a cappucino or latte.
These do have the advantage of being priced lower too..

Shane


Danny wrote:
> shane wrote:
> >>From what I have noticed, using the stainless pitchers only make sense
> > with a milk drink.
> > A typical size cup or mug does not fit under the spouts, hence the mini
> > pitchers.
>
> Is that a US typical size mug? Typical Italian size cups (5-7oz) and
> typical UK size cups (8-12oz) fit fine. For anything larger than an
> 8-10oz drink, many espresso shots would be required to keep within
> accepted ratios. I serve 10 oz drinks, with a double, which is too
> weak by italian standards, but strong enough for my customers. I
> myself drink 5 oz milk drinks, with a double shot of espresso
> contained therein.
>
>
> --
> Regards, Danny
>
> http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
> http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/EU ordering for Malabar Gold blend)



  
Date: 26 Dec 2006 21:04:37
From: Danny
Subject: Re: stainless shot pitchers?
shane wrote:
> It seem to be the typical US style mug. 8-12 oz. Most coffee places
> use disposable cups, and those are too tall as well.
> Accepted milk ratio? Another whole can of worms :) I have an even
> harder time getting the right ratio. I often opt for "machiatos"
> which as made by the local shops around me, are closer to the
> traditional Italian proportions of milk for a cappucino or latte.
> These do have the advantage of being priced lower too..
>

Both my 10 & 12oz take away cups fit under the standard height group.
Newer machines have raised groups for this purpose, so I would doubt
that is the reason for using the pitchers. My machiato is the
"correct" one - ked with a dash of steamed foam. My cappa and
lattes are 1/3 espresso, or weaker if the customer desires, which a
lot do. I have a special order for regulars - they know to order an
"italian strength" cappa or latte if they prefer a stronger drink, and
we don't charge for extra shots, for this reason :)


--
Regards, Danny

http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/EU ordering for Malabar Gold blend)



 
Date: 26 Dec 2006 06:14:14
From: shane
Subject: Re: stainless shot pitchers?
>From what I have noticed, using the stainless pitchers only make sense
with a milk drink.
A typical size cup or mug does not fit under the spouts, hence the mini
pitchers.

Shane

Felix wrote:
> Bob suggests:
> > Could be an "aiming" issue; i.e., it's harder to line up the
> > little china cup vs. the larger pitcher.
>
> That's the explanation I got from a restaurant that decanted its shots.
> Their staff was concerned about serving shots that looked neat, and
> their customers didn't seem to care. The explanation is less convincing
> when the espresso is part of a milky drink, but it still has merit.
>
>
> Felix



  
Date: 26 Dec 2006 17:09:29
From: Danny
Subject: Re: stainless shot pitchers?
shane wrote:
>>From what I have noticed, using the stainless pitchers only make sense
> with a milk drink.
> A typical size cup or mug does not fit under the spouts, hence the mini
> pitchers.

Is that a US typical size mug? Typical Italian size cups (5-7oz) and
typical UK size cups (8-12oz) fit fine. For anything larger than an
8-10oz drink, many espresso shots would be required to keep within
accepted ratios. I serve 10 oz drinks, with a double, which is too
weak by italian standards, but strong enough for my customers. I
myself drink 5 oz milk drinks, with a double shot of espresso
contained therein.


--
Regards, Danny

http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/EU ordering for Malabar Gold blend)



 
Date: 22 Dec 2006 20:18:02
From: Felix
Subject: Re: stainless shot pitchers?
Bob suggests:
> Could be an "aiming" issue; i.e., it's harder to line up the
> little china cup vs. the larger pitcher.

That's the explanation I got from a restaurant that decanted its shots.
Their staff was concerned about serving shots that looked neat, and
their customers didn't seem to care. The explanation is less convincing
when the espresso is part of a milky drink, but it still has merit.


Felix



  
Date: 23 Dec 2006 11:47:09
From: Danny
Subject: Re: stainless shot pitchers?
Felix wrote:
> Bob suggests:
>
>> Could be an "aiming" issue; i.e., it's harder to line up the
>> little china cup vs. the larger pitcher.
>
>
> That's the explanation I got from a restaurant that decanted its shots.
> Their staff was concerned about serving shots that looked neat, and
> their customers didn't seem to care. The explanation is less convincing
> when the espresso is part of a milky drink, but it still has merit.
>
>
> Felix
>

I explain any drips running down the cups as the "ka da barista" -
spelling proably wrong, but a term in italian (k of the barista)
that shows a lovingly prepared drink, since the barista knew when to
cut the shot (especially on lever machines, which I use).

--
Regards, Danny

http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/EU ordering for Malabar Gold blend)



 
Date: 22 Dec 2006 11:40:09
From: shane
Subject: Re: stainless shot pitchers?

Danny wrote:
> yetanotherBob wrote:
>
> > Could be an "aiming" issue; i.e., it's harder to line up the little
> > china cup vs. the larger pitcher. Plus, if they're pulling two cups,
> > they get to eyeball that the two cups are more or less evenly filled,
> > rather than rely on the filter holder spouts to do it right.
> >
> > Bob
>
> I would never produce a drink in anything other than the vessel it
> will be consumed in. I don't do large cups that won't fit the spouts
> and I can't imagine wasting the crema by decanting into another cup.
> I also only serve doubles so the issue of filling two cups doesn't arise.
>
>
> --
> Regards, Danny
>
> http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
> http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/EU ordering for Malabar Gold blend)

I share your opinion, that is exactly how things should be done. I am
trying to figure out the mentality of the other way, so I can figure
out how to diplomaticaly explain to people who have been improperly
trained how things should be done.

I feel as though I am fighting an uphill battle in championing the
cause of good coffee. I run into a lot of, "but I work at a coffee
shop, so I know everything" .

Shane



  
Date: 22 Dec 2006 11:57:21
From: Randy G.
Subject: Re: stainless shot pitchers?
"shane" <shane.olson@juno.com > wrote:
>I share your opinion, that is exactly how things should be done. I am
>trying to figure out the mentality of the other way, so I can figure
>out how to diplomaticaly explain to people who have been improperly
>trained how things should be done.

Customer takes sip and immediately spit-takes a mouthful of product
all across the counter, and yells, "WHAT THE HELL IS THIS? It tastes
like someone pumped a bucketful of dirty mop water from a backwoods
gas station through an old pair of discarded underwear! I've got
better espresso than this in my drip tray at home"

Well. OK. Not terribly diplomatic, but it would get the point across.
;-)


Randy "haven't done a goo spit take in quite some time" G.
http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com




 
Date: 22 Dec 2006 13:15:01
From: yetanotherBob
Subject: Re: stainless shot pitchers?
In article <1166810648.052181.127780@i12g2000cwa.googlegroups.com >,
shane.olson@juno.com says...
> What is it with coffee shops insistance on using stainless steel shot
> pichers? I can see using them when making a latte for a togo cup that
> doesn't fit under the spout. Most of the time when I order an espresso
> it is made into a stainless cup and them dumped into a demitass cup.
>
> Most of the time the PBTC has no clue why they are doing anything and
> have been trained to use the stainless shot pitchers. They usually
> give me a look of puzzlement when I ask about it, like it can't be done
> any other way.
>
> Shane
>
>
Could be an "aiming" issue; i.e., it's harder to line up the little
china cup vs. the larger pitcher. Plus, if they're pulling two cups,
they get to eyeball that the two cups are more or less evenly filled,
rather than rely on the filter holder spouts to do it right.

Bob


  
Date: 22 Dec 2006 18:26:19
From: Danny
Subject: Re: stainless shot pitchers?
yetanotherBob wrote:

> Could be an "aiming" issue; i.e., it's harder to line up the little
> china cup vs. the larger pitcher. Plus, if they're pulling two cups,
> they get to eyeball that the two cups are more or less evenly filled,
> rather than rely on the filter holder spouts to do it right.
>
> Bob

I would never produce a drink in anything other than the vessel it
will be consumed in. I don't do large cups that won't fit the spouts
and I can't imagine wasting the crema by decanting into another cup.
I also only serve doubles so the issue of filling two cups doesn't arise.


--
Regards, Danny

http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/EU ordering for Malabar Gold blend)