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Date: 11 Aug 2007 13:30:09
From: Sportflyer
Subject: storing freshly roasted beans
I buy the roasted beans from a local roastery and I have been storing the
roasted beans in a Glass Canning jar and vacuum sealing it . I do notice
that if the beans were freshly roasted then the vacuum will be lost from a
few hrs to overnight due to the C02 outgassing . I then reseal it and then
the vacuum will last a very long time. I only buy enough beans for about 10
days usage and keep about 2 days worth of beans in the grinder hopper which
means I have to unseal the vacuum jar and resealing it after dispensing a
fifth of the beans each time. I am wondering whether its worth the hassle
of storing the beans under vacuum for such a short time. ? Tks






 
Date: 22 Aug 2007 09:18:13
From: Mike
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
On Aug 22, 9:10 am, Moka Java <rtwatc...@yahoo.com > wrote:
> Mike Hartigan wrote:
> > In article <ldpec3pvj1docoesimt041c5hq6au8h...@4ax.com>,
> > ba...@rileys-coffee.com says...
> >> [...]
> >> beans are ready for consumption from the moment they're roasted. some
> >> people prefer the taste of slightly staled coffee, and i can't argue
> >> with someone's taste. i find it amusing that in all this quest for
> >> "freshness" in coffee, there are vocal advocates of allowing coffee to
> >> stale a bit before consumption.
>
> >> "resting" is staling, plain and simple. again, i'm not going to fault
> >> you for a preference for slightly staled coffee (i've got my own taste
> >> quirks), but to think that coffee is unfit for consumption immediately
> >> upon roasting is just, well, way off the mark.
>
> > While they may be ready for consumption, they're not ready for
> > brewing. The grounds seem to actively repel water immediately after
> > roasting. The water can't get past the bubble that forms around the
> > coffee due to the CO2 trying to escape as the temperature rises. No
> > water means no extraction. The result is a very weak brew and a
> > flavor not at all like 'fresh' coffee. Depending on the bean, the
> > flavor seems to peak anywhere from 24-36 hours after roasting.
>
> Try a press pot and a bit of stirring. It works. Really. I've
> actually done it.

Perhaps. But if you use a drip machine, you're typically left with a
filter basket full of foam and an anemic brew.

> R "your taste buds are not my taste buds which are not Barry's taste
> buds" TF

True enough.




  
Date: 22 Aug 2007 19:21:19
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
On Wed, 22 Aug 2007 09:18:13 -0700, Mike <ls1mike@gmail.com > wrote:

>Perhaps. But if you use a drip machine, you're typically left with a
>filter basket full of foam and an anemic brew.
>

that's because drip machines have terrible turbulence performance, and
sufficient turbulence is an essential component in proper brewing.

don't blame the coffee for the inadequacies of the machine.


 
Date: 19 Aug 2007 14:10:32
From: Felix
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
Barry responds:
> resting has started to put on an objective overcoat for
> neophytes. i've lost count of the times i've been told
> that "coffee must rest for three days before brewing",
> and [...]

Ok, fine ... be your usual accurate self. Once upon a time, we'd
discuss the issue with zealots who'd done their homework. Now,
everyone wants a simple formula, especially if it's affordable.

In my case, the turning point was some Intelligentsia Ghimbi, roasted
by a coworker in an I-Roast. This occurred before Intelligentsia
retailed green beans, but someone owed me a small favor so I was able
to get some green. I was astonished in two ways. First, I strongly
preferred the homeroast version to Intelligentia's. Secondly, I liked
it even though I had always preferred relatively mellow (i.e. low-
acid) coffees. That Ghimbi literally changed my life. All bets were
off.

I still think my experience with custom roasted DP Brazil (small
Diedrich) justifies the claim that resting sometimes helps, but
there's a big difference between that coffee, roasted so that patches
of oil appear after a few days, and high-EGT Ethiopian. I also think
the emergence of oil long after the beans hit the cooling tray
indicates that staling isn't the only process that begins after
roasting ends. Plain and simple?


Felix



  
Date: 20 Aug 2007 15:17:14
From: Neal Reid
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
In article
<1187557832.450174.224740@x40g2000prg.googlegroups.com >,
Felix <felixyen@hotmail.com > wrote:

> I also think
> the emergence of oil long after the beans hit the cooling tray
> indicates that staling isn't the only process that begins after
> roasting ends. Plain and simple?

And speaking of s'getti, to my taste, it isn't the pasta that
improves when it sits on itself for a while - but the sauce. Our
veggie chili is CERTAINLY better after a few days in the freezer
than fresh out of the pot. All to do with the spices getting to
mingle a bit...

I've often wondered if, in certain coffees, something doesn't
improve as it infuses through the bean - akin to the spices
mentioned above.

--
M for N in address to mail reply


 
Date: 18 Aug 2007 21:30:48
From: Felix
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
Barry writes:
> "resting" is staling, plain and simple.

Staling occurs when beans are "resting," but is this the only change
that occurs?

> to think that coffee is unfit for consumption immediately
> upon roasting is just, well, way off the mark.

"unfit" is a bit strong, and some people who advocate resting beans
don't do so universally. I think it's worth noting that there are many
precedents for resting food before cooking or serving it.

> (i've got my own taste quirks)

e.g. your love for gazpacho which encompasses all variations,
including white gazpacho (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gazpacho)?


Felix



  
Date: 19 Aug 2007 02:34:06
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
On Sat, 18 Aug 2007 21:30:48 -0700, Felix <felixyen@hotmail.com >
wrote:

>> to think that coffee is unfit for consumption immediately
>> upon roasting is just, well, way off the mark.
>
>"unfit" is a bit strong, and some people who advocate resting beans
>don't do so universally.

as with other essentially subjective coffee metrics which get bandied
about, resting has started to put on an objective overcoat for
neophytes. i've lost count of the times i've been told that "coffee
must rest for three days before brewing", and, in this particular
thread, i put fingers to keys because of the following comment:

>>Actually, I'm surprised your roastery is selling you beans
>>that aren't ready for consumption. Do they explain to you
>>that they aren't ready yet?


>I think it's worth noting that there are many
>precedents for resting food before cooking or serving it.

sure. i like left-over spaghetti better than just-made spaghetti, but
you won't see me telling june to prep the s'ketti a few days in
advance because "it's not ready for consumption" when she makes it
(since "unfit" may be too strong). ;)


>e.g. your love for gazpacho which encompasses all variations,
>including white gazpacho (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gazpacho)?

blech. junie is the gazpacho one. i'm the one with pickles on my
pizza.



 
Date: 18 Aug 2007 07:34:53
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
On Aug 13, 9:23 am, blowery <blow...@gmail.com > wrote:
> On Aug 13, 2:04 am, "Sportflyer" <mode1flyerNOS...@netzero.net> wrote:
>
> > They are ready 99% of the time . Once in a while I do get a batch that is
> > probably roasted only a few hrs ago. These are the ones that are still
> > degassing when I vacuum seal them and the jar looses vacuum overnight. But
> > its not a problem a second vacuum application will definitly work.
>
> > I wonder how the vacuum seal willl hold in the freezer.
>
> The vacuum seal should hold up just fine in the freezer. Instead of
> canning jars, I use a FoodSaver vacuum sealer with the plastic bags.
> I've frozen beans for up to a month so far and they've been great.
> Havn't tried over a month yet, as I go through the beans fast enough
> to not need that much more storage... :)

Same here and I have. Not good, but it was well over a month,
possibly over three. End result is a reminder of a staleness often
associated with freshly opened, commercially vacuumed cans of, at
best, mundane coffee.

I've a variant on removal from freezer. Hot and roasted beans
immediately get bagged (after reaching room temperature) and triple-
sealed (with the vacuum unit's heat strip only - I don't bother to
engage the vacuum anymore). They do subsequently expel gas in freezer
and the bags swell out some.

I used to let the bagged beans sit out to cure 98 hours or whatever.
Before freezing, and not no more. I've taken to using two outgoing
receptacles (glass candy jars with snap-lock wire lids and rubber
grommet) to receive stored, freshly roasted frozen beans. When
kitchen counter top candy jar #1 approaches empty, in-waiting candy
jar #2 is substituted for #1, and #1 is then refilled to become #2.

A refill is enough to last for at least 48 hours consumption - about a
cup of beans. Basically, any positive affect of curing occuring takes
place after freezing in jar #2.



 
Date: 17 Aug 2007 22:29:44
From:
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
"Resting", letting fresh roasted beans sit, unprotected in ambient
temperature for eight to ninety-six hours prior to consuming is a
fairly new idea among professional s who handle coffee for a living on
the edge of the trade called specialty coffee.

My first experience with this idea was many years ago when I was
invited to cup with some friends at Pete McLaughlin's office in
Emeryville CA. Pete said he had to go in after dinner the night
before because he had to set up the flights of coffee for the
morning. I thought he was kidding. He explained that he always
roasted and ground his samples the night before to let them degas
prior to cupping. This was something new to me, and it flew in the
face of everything I had been taught about cupping which amounted to
roast, grind, slurp, spit, next flight. My companions at table the
next morning included Philippe Jobin and Paul Katzeff among others.
No one thought this idea of roasting and grinding the night before was
in any way unusual. I said no more, but filed the experience away and
remembered.

Some time later I began to hear the phrase "resting" to explain this
novel way of treating fresh roasted coffee. It is particularly
popular among home roasters, and it does not appear to have devotees
among professionals who deal with coffee for a living. Mike Sivetz
holds you must get fresh roasted coffee into an inert cold state as
fast as possible to protect it from the harmful effects of oxidation.
Gerald Baldwin has told the difference of even one hour's wait before
packing the fresh roasted beans was detrimental to the taste and
subsequent fresh-life of the coffee. NYBOT graders roast, grind,
slurp, and spit.

My own experience is that the degassing argument (fresh coffee has CO2
particles clinging to the coffee particles preventing proper
extraction) for "resting" does not hold, as a stir of the slurry
eliminates any CO2 from clinging to the bean particles, and I hold my
conviction that freshness delayed is freshness denied, but I find the
argument of letting the elements of taste developed and freed by the
roasting process to develop together while the beans are held in a
state of "rest" prior to packing in a barrier package to be worthy of
continued experimentation.

Anything that you can do to protect your fresh roasted coffee from the
time you determine to prevent further staling should be done. Double
bagging helps, rolling down the bag, banding it with tape or a rubber
band and dropping it in an old clean coffee can helps, freezing helps,
and pulling even a partial vacuum helps a little.

Defend your coffee from air, moisture, direct sunlight, and changes in
its storage environment, and you will have relatively fresh coffee to
enjoy when you want it.

-Donald Schoenholt





 
Date: 13 Aug 2007 13:23:43
From: blowery
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
On Aug 13, 2:04 am, "Sportflyer" <mode1flyerNOS...@netzero.net > wrote:
> They are ready 99% of the time . Once in a while I do get a batch that is
> probably roasted only a few hrs ago. These are the ones that are still
> degassing when I vacuum seal them and the jar looses vacuum overnight. But
> its not a problem a second vacuum application will definitly work.
>
> I wonder how the vacuum seal willl hold in the freezer.

The vacuum seal should hold up just fine in the freezer. Instead of
canning jars, I use a FoodSaver vacuum sealer with the plastic bags.
I've frozen beans for up to a month so far and they've been great.
Havn't tried over a month yet, as I go through the beans fast enough
to not need that much more storage... :)



  
Date: 13 Aug 2007 14:50:30
From: Sportflyer
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
I use a canning jar with foodsaver vacuum adapter because its reuseable .

"blowery" <blowery@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1187011423.640003.211550@q4g2000prc.googlegroups.com...
> On Aug 13, 2:04 am, "Sportflyer" <mode1flyerNOS...@netzero.net> wrote:
>> They are ready 99% of the time . Once in a while I do get a batch that is
>> probably roasted only a few hrs ago. These are the ones that are still
>> degassing when I vacuum seal them and the jar looses vacuum overnight.
>> But
>> its not a problem a second vacuum application will definitly work.
>>
>> I wonder how the vacuum seal willl hold in the freezer.
>
> The vacuum seal should hold up just fine in the freezer. Instead of
> canning jars, I use a FoodSaver vacuum sealer with the plastic bags.
> I've frozen beans for up to a month so far and they've been great.
> Havn't tried over a month yet, as I go through the beans fast enough
> to not need that much more storage... :)
>




 
Date: 11 Aug 2007 22:26:11
From: Kent
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans

"Sportflyer" <mode1flyerNOSPAM@netzero.net > wrote in message
news:GdidnYLcp8PegSPbnZ2dnUVZ_veinZ2d@comcast.com...
>I buy the roasted beans from a local roastery and I have been storing the
>roasted beans in a Glass Canning jar and vacuum sealing it . I do notice
>that if the beans were freshly roasted then the vacuum will be lost from a
>few hrs to overnight due to the C02 outgassing . I then reseal it and then
>the vacuum will last a very long time. I only buy enough beans for about 10
>days usage and keep about 2 days worth of beans in the grinder hopper which
>means I have to unseal the vacuum jar and resealing it after dispensing a
>fifth of the beans each time. I am wondering whether its worth the hassle
>of storing the beans under vacuum for such a short time. ? Tks
>
Freeze your beans.





  
Date: 12 Aug 2007 18:23:30
From: Natalie Drest
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans

"Kent" <kh6444@comcast.net > wrote in message
news:L_GdnSB1BN9uBCPbnZ2dnUVZ_tOtnZ2d@comcast.com...
>
> "Sportflyer" <mode1flyerNOSPAM@netzero.net> wrote in message
> news:GdidnYLcp8PegSPbnZ2dnUVZ_veinZ2d@comcast.com...
>>I buy the roasted beans from a local roastery and I have been storing the
>>roasted beans in a Glass Canning jar and vacuum sealing it . I do notice
>>that if the beans were freshly roasted then the vacuum will be lost from a
>>few hrs to overnight due to the C02 outgassing . I then reseal it and then
>>the vacuum will last a very long time. I only buy enough beans for about
>>10 days usage and keep about 2 days worth of beans in the grinder hopper
>>which means I have to unseal the vacuum jar and resealing it after
>>dispensing a fifth of the beans each time. I am wondering whether its
>>worth the hassle of storing the beans under vacuum for such a short time.
>>? Tks
>>
> Freeze your beans.

Definitely. But put them in your canning jars (after they've gassed off- 3
days is usual) first & seal.
Take them out of the freezer 6 hours or so before you need to use them, but
DON"T open them until they've reached rom temperature- otherwise water in
the air will condense on them (like it does on the outside of a glass full
of cold beer). You don't want wet beans.

This way you can buy plenty of beans & save trips to the roastery. I fill my
300g. hopper with fresh beans, & freeze the rest. Takes about 5-7 days to
use them up. Then I thaw & open one of my frozen jars, fill the hopper,
rinse & repeat. The frozen beans taste & perform exactly as the fresh ones.

Actually, I'm surprised your roastery is selling you beans that aren't ready
for consumption. Do they explain to you that they aren't ready yet?




   
Date: 12 Aug 2007 23:04:32
From: Sportflyer
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
They are ready 99% of the time . Once in a while I do get a batch that is
probably roasted only a few hrs ago. These are the ones that are still
degassing when I vacuum seal them and the jar looses vacuum overnight. But
its not a problem a second vacuum application will definitly work.

I wonder how the vacuum seal willl hold in the freezer.

"Natalie Drest" <fugeddaboudit@notarealemailaddress.net > wrote in message
news:46bec2fc@dnews.tpgi.com.au...
>
> "Kent" <kh6444@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:L_GdnSB1BN9uBCPbnZ2dnUVZ_tOtnZ2d@comcast.com...
>>
>> "Sportflyer" <mode1flyerNOSPAM@netzero.net> wrote in message
>> news:GdidnYLcp8PegSPbnZ2dnUVZ_veinZ2d@comcast.com...
>>>I buy the roasted beans from a local roastery and I have been storing the
>>>roasted beans in a Glass Canning jar and vacuum sealing it . I do notice
>>>that if the beans were freshly roasted then the vacuum will be lost from
>>>a few hrs to overnight due to the C02 outgassing . I then reseal it and
>>>then the vacuum will last a very long time. I only buy enough beans for
>>>about 10 days usage and keep about 2 days worth of beans in the grinder
>>>hopper which means I have to unseal the vacuum jar and resealing it after
>>>dispensing a fifth of the beans each time. I am wondering whether its
>>>worth the hassle of storing the beans under vacuum for such a short
>>>time. ? Tks
>>>
>> Freeze your beans.
>
> Definitely. But put them in your canning jars (after they've gassed off- 3
> days is usual) first & seal.
> Take them out of the freezer 6 hours or so before you need to use them,
> but DON"T open them until they've reached rom temperature- otherwise water
> in the air will condense on them (like it does on the outside of a glass
> full of cold beer). You don't want wet beans.
>
> This way you can buy plenty of beans & save trips to the roastery. I fill
> my 300g. hopper with fresh beans, & freeze the rest. Takes about 5-7 days
> to use them up. Then I thaw & open one of my frozen jars, fill the hopper,
> rinse & repeat. The frozen beans taste & perform exactly as the fresh
> ones.
>
> Actually, I'm surprised your roastery is selling you beans that aren't
> ready for consumption. Do they explain to you that they aren't ready yet?
>




    
Date: 14 Aug 2007 13:33:53
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
On Sun, 12 Aug 2007 23:04:32 -0700, "Sportflyer"
<mode1flyerNOSPAM@netzero.net > wrote:

>They are ready 99% of the time . Once in a while I do get a batch that is
>probably roasted only a few hrs ago. These are the ones that are still
>degassing when I vacuum seal them and the jar looses vacuum overnight. But
>its not a problem a second vacuum application will definitly work.
>
>I wonder how the vacuum seal willl hold in the freezer.
>

you're really wasting your time with the vac pac thing. home vac
systems don't pull enough vac out to prevent oxidation staling in the
coffee.



     
Date: 17 Aug 2007 17:21:18
From: Dee Dee
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans

"Barry Jarrett" <barry@rileys-coffee.com > wrote in message
news:3vs3c35la0dejjq1pc67hnmv9kn2c07jfa@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 12 Aug 2007 23:04:32 -0700, "Sportflyer"
> <mode1flyerNOSPAM@netzero.net> wrote:
>
> >They are ready 99% of the time . Once in a while I do get a batch that is
> >probably roasted only a few hrs ago. These are the ones that are still
> >degassing when I vacuum seal them and the jar looses vacuum overnight.
> >But
> >its not a problem a second vacuum application will definitly work.
> >
> >I wonder how the vacuum seal willl hold in the freezer.
> >
>
> you're really wasting your time with the vac pac thing. home vac
> systems don't pull enough vac out to prevent oxidation staling in the
> coffee.

What systems have you used?
Dee Dee




   
Date: 12 Aug 2007 23:29:00
From: Espressopithecus (Java Man)
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
In article <46bec2fc@dnews.tpgi.com.au >,
fugeddaboudit@notarealemailaddress.net says...
> > Freeze your beans.
>
> Definitely. But put them in your canning jars (after they've gassed off- 3
> days is usual) first & seal.
>
That's not what I've read in other threads (and what I've copied in my
own roasting). I've read that the coffee should be frozen immediately
after it's cooled to room temperature.

Did I miss a thread somewhere about this, or is my memory faulty?

Rick


   
Date: 12 Aug 2007 13:21:18
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
On Sun, 12 Aug 2007 18:23:30 +1000, "Natalie Drest"
<fugeddaboudit@notarealemailaddress.net > wrote:

>Definitely. But put them in your canning jars (after they've gassed off- 3
>days is usual) first & seal.

yes, and close the barn door after the horses have left, too.


>Actually, I'm surprised your roastery is selling you beans that aren't ready
>for consumption. Do they explain to you that they aren't ready yet?

beans are ready for consumption from the moment they're roasted.



    
Date: 17 Aug 2007 17:19:47
From: Dee Dee
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans

"Barry Jarrett" <barry@rileys-coffee.com > wrote in message
news:9rjub3tj5u24r8sfk4e856hd635atppo97@4ax.com...
>
> beans are ready for consumption from the moment they're roasted.

I've always read that they have to sit a while to gas off.
Dee Dee






     
Date: 18 Aug 2007 16:36:52
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
On Fri, 17 Aug 2007 17:19:47 -0400, "Dee Dee" <deedovey@shentel.net >
wrote:

>
>"Barry Jarrett" <barry@rileys-coffee.com> wrote in message
>news:9rjub3tj5u24r8sfk4e856hd635atppo97@4ax.com...
>>
>> beans are ready for consumption from the moment they're roasted.
>
>I've always read that they have to sit a while to gas off.

beans are ready for consumption from the moment they're roasted. some
people prefer the taste of slightly staled coffee, and i can't argue
with someone's taste. i find it amusing that in all this quest for
"freshness" in coffee, there are vocal advocates of allowing coffee to
stale a bit before consumption.

"resting" is staling, plain and simple. again, i'm not going to fault
you for a preference for slightly staled coffee (i've got my own taste
quirks), but to think that coffee is unfit for consumption immediately
upon roasting is just, well, way off the mark.



      
Date: 21 Aug 2007 16:39:41
From: Mike Hartigan
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
In article <ldpec3pvj1docoesimt041c5hq6au8h0gd@4ax.com >,
barry@rileys-coffee.com says...
> [...]
> beans are ready for consumption from the moment they're roasted. some
> people prefer the taste of slightly staled coffee, and i can't argue
> with someone's taste. i find it amusing that in all this quest for
> "freshness" in coffee, there are vocal advocates of allowing coffee to
> stale a bit before consumption.
>
> "resting" is staling, plain and simple. again, i'm not going to fault
> you for a preference for slightly staled coffee (i've got my own taste
> quirks), but to think that coffee is unfit for consumption immediately
> upon roasting is just, well, way off the mark.

While they may be ready for consumption, they're not ready for
brewing. The grounds seem to actively repel water immediately after
roasting. The water can't get past the bubble that forms around the
coffee due to the CO2 trying to escape as the temperature rises. No
water means no extraction. The result is a very weak brew and a
flavor not at all like 'fresh' coffee. Depending on the bean, the
flavor seems to peak anywhere from 24-36 hours after roasting.

--
-Mike


       
Date: 22 Aug 2007 19:19:43
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
On Tue, 21 Aug 2007 16:39:41 -0500, Mike Hartigan
<mike@hartigan.dot.com > wrote:

>roasting. The water can't get past the bubble that forms around the
>coffee due to the CO2 trying to escape as the temperature rises. No
>water means no extraction

what brewing method?



        
Date: 22 Aug 2007 21:07:10
From: Mike Hartigan
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
In article <1kkpc390ucuav42hej1no822hp9k979c1i@4ax.com >,
barry@rileys-coffee.com says...
> On Tue, 21 Aug 2007 16:39:41 -0500, Mike Hartigan
> <mike@hartigan.dot.com> wrote:
>
> >roasting. The water can't get past the bubble that forms around the
> >coffee due to the CO2 trying to escape as the temperature rises. No
> >water means no extraction
>
> what brewing method?

It most noticable with a drip machine. But even my Gaggia turns out
shots that are less than stellar without at least a 24 hour rest.

--
-Mike


       
Date: 22 Aug 2007 10:10:03
From: Moka Java
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
Mike Hartigan wrote:
> In article <ldpec3pvj1docoesimt041c5hq6au8h0gd@4ax.com>,
> barry@rileys-coffee.com says...
>> [...]
>> beans are ready for consumption from the moment they're roasted. some
>> people prefer the taste of slightly staled coffee, and i can't argue
>> with someone's taste. i find it amusing that in all this quest for
>> "freshness" in coffee, there are vocal advocates of allowing coffee to
>> stale a bit before consumption.
>>
>> "resting" is staling, plain and simple. again, i'm not going to fault
>> you for a preference for slightly staled coffee (i've got my own taste
>> quirks), but to think that coffee is unfit for consumption immediately
>> upon roasting is just, well, way off the mark.
>
> While they may be ready for consumption, they're not ready for
> brewing. The grounds seem to actively repel water immediately after
> roasting. The water can't get past the bubble that forms around the
> coffee due to the CO2 trying to escape as the temperature rises. No
> water means no extraction. The result is a very weak brew and a
> flavor not at all like 'fresh' coffee. Depending on the bean, the
> flavor seems to peak anywhere from 24-36 hours after roasting.
>

Try a press pot and a bit of stirring. It works. Really. I've
actually done it.

R "your taste buds are not my taste buds which are not Barry's taste
buds" TF


    
Date: 12 Aug 2007 20:43:50
From: Moka Java
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
Barry Jarrett wrote:
>
> beans are ready for consumption from the moment they're roasted.
>

Yeah, but don't you agree that they might be better a day or 2 or 3 or 4
or 5 later?

R "something about the fizz factor" TF


     
Date: 13 Aug 2007 01:24:00
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
On Sun, 12 Aug 2007 20:43:50 -0400, Moka Java
<rtwatches@fishyahoo.com > wrote:

>Yeah, but don't you agree that they might be better a day or 2 or 3 or 4
> or 5 later?

*might*.

might not.

how do you know if you don't start tasting it right away? ;)

i'll take yrg right out of the roaster any day.




      
Date: 17 Aug 2007 17:20:14
From: Dee Dee
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans

"Barry Jarrett" <barry@rileys-coffee.com > wrote in message
news:9kevb3tb0qdt7bfdcjeb70cs69bjnuk5mg@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 12 Aug 2007 20:43:50 -0400, Moka Java
> <rtwatches@fishyahoo.com> wrote:
>
> >Yeah, but don't you agree that they might be better a day or 2 or 3 or 4
> > or 5 later?
>
> *might*.
>
> might not.
>
> how do you know if you don't start tasting it right away? ;)
>
> i'll take yrg right out of the roaster any day.
>
That's fine if you like it that way.
Dee Dee




      
Date: 13 Aug 2007 15:15:56
From: Moka Java
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
Barry Jarrett wrote:
> On Sun, 12 Aug 2007 20:43:50 -0400, Moka Java
> <rtwatches@fishyahoo.com> wrote:
>
> >Yeah, but don't you agree that they might be better a day or 2 or 3 or 4
> > or 5 later?
>
> *might*.
>
> might not.
>
> how do you know if you don't start tasting it right away? ;)

Of course I do. Just roasted coffee tends to have a weird mouth feel
and tastes one dimensional, either flat or sharp. Another problem is
that the active degassing can interfere with some brewing methods. The
bloom in a press pot is no problem but espresso cames out as a cup of
foam and filter drip can overflow the basket.

>
> i'll take yrg right out of the roaster any day.
>

I don't roast Yirg so right out of the roaster (the dog bowl at my
house) is hard to come by. An exception here, though. I recently
received a bag of DP Yirg that I can roast acceptably. It's been
getting better every day since roasting Saturday morning.

R "freezing coffee works great but show me 1 iota of proof that vacuum
sealing does any good" TF


       
Date: 13 Aug 2007 13:10:10
From: I->Ian
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans
On Mon, 13 Aug 2007 15:15:56 -0400, Moka Java <rtwatches@yahoo.com >
wrote:

>R "freezing coffee works great but show me 1 iota of proof that vacuum
>sealing does any good" TF

When you take it to outer space, the bag does not burst.


 
Date: 11 Aug 2007 17:05:56
From: Craig Andrews
Subject: Re: storing freshly roasted beans

"Sportflyer" <mode1flyerNOSPAM@netzero.net > wrote in message
news:GdidnYLcp8PegSPbnZ2dnUVZ_veinZ2d@comcast.com...
>I buy the roasted beans from a local roastery and I have been storing the
>roasted beans in a Glass Canning jar and vacuum sealing it . I do notice
>that if the beans were freshly roasted then the vacuum will be lost from a
>few hrs to overnight due to the C02 outgassing . I then reseal it and then
>the vacuum will last a very long time. I only buy enough beans for about 10
>days usage and keep about 2 days worth of beans in the grinder hopper which
>means I have to unseal the vacuum jar and resealing it after dispensing a
>fifth of the beans each time. I am wondering whether its worth the hassle
>of storing the beans under vacuum for such a short time. ? Tks
>

No.
Craig.