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Date: 13 Jul 2007 09:11:18
From: Walter H. Lewis III
Subject: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
I've been looking for what I consider the ultimate travel mug and so
far am shooting blanks. To me the MUSTS are:

12 oz
stainless steel
dishwasher safe
leakproof and the lid must fit OVER the mug nit inside so that when I
fill the mug up it doesn't spill coffee everywhere when I put the lid
on.

If anyone can suggest a source of a mug like this, please let me know
I want a half dozen!!!

Walt




 
Date: 31 Jul 2007 02:45:31
From: rasqual
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
On Jul 29, 10:24 pm, David Lewis <DavidMLe...@mac.com > wrote:
> On 2007-07-15 16:42:02 -0700, Scott Sellers <scottsell...@mindspring.com> said:
>
> > Thanks for pointing that out. Would you say there are any tenths
> > of seconds in daily driving that aren't fraught with imminent
> > destruction?
>
> While this is getting well and truly off topic, and I hesitate to add
> to the atmosphere of accusation that's creeping in (since you never
> said you did any of the things people are talking about), the answer to
> this question is yes; the problem is that we don't know which ones.
> From a human factors point of view, driving is a terrible combination,
> being both dangerous and boring.

Philosophically I believe the issue is "incorrigibility" -- though not
of the strictly logical type one associates, if one is a
foundationalist, with the cogito. Practically speaking,
incorrigibility is the principle that keeps me from seeming an idiot.
Without it, I would walk about paranoid about laws of thermodynamics
possibly failing, with all air molecules around me suddenly migrating
to some more fortunate fellow nearby. Or perhaps the ground would gape
at my feet and swallow me whole -- and this could happen at any
moment! Aaaaugh!

No, we have to believe certain things -- or rather, we have to avoid
believing a vast number of myriad things which could, indeed,
conceivably go terribly wrong. The problem is that no mind could
possible conceive them all so as to reduce the risk of each occuring.

This phenomenon is evident in a market where various health foods are
sold. It's virtually assured that every human on the planet is failing
to do as well by themselves as better acquaintance with a range of
healthier products than those they're using would permit, if only
they'd become aware of them. Of them all.

Thus, our burden is not to know so much, but to avoid feeling as if we
have to know so much.

Martin Luther said "sin boldy," by which he meant that one would be
immobile if one was concerned to attempt being perfect. In his spirit,
then, I shall continue to drive and drink. Coffee, of course.

- Scott



 
Date: 31 Jul 2007 02:37:03
From: rasqual
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
On Jul 13, 8:11 am, Walter H. Lewis III <wal...@hotmail.com > wrote:
> I've been looking for what I consider the ultimate travel mug and so
> far am shooting blanks. To me the MUSTS are:

Sorry, the following won't have it. But since this conversation has
broached every logical fallacy known to man, I figure I might as well
introduce flat contradiction and offer my own favorites.

http://snurl.com/1oyz9
Been around forever. Nice. Doesn't fit a lot of cup holders in cars
(where's my suit of armor for even alluding to the prospect of a
travel mug being used while . . . traveling!), but it fits a Coke can
inside it to keep that cold and eliminate condensate dripping. An
Aeropress also fits nicely inside it for suitcasing (and an immersion
heater fits handily inside the Aeropress -- a compact kit which you
can then drop into the doser of your Mazzer Major and hit the road!).

At the farmer's market, on windy days I frequently tell customers that
if they're leaving, take the lid off the coffee in their car for a bit
before they drive off, and enjoy some sips with all the aromatics.
Lids are really bad for coffee drinking.

I'll patent a lid with a thumb-pump that wafts interior air out
through the drinking hole while sipping. ;-)

- Scott



 
Date: 29 Jul 2007 12:47:39
From: Zeek!
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
On Fri, 13 Jul 2007 09:11:18 -0400, Walter H. Lewis III
<walt_l@hotmail.com > wrote:

>I've been looking for what I consider the ultimate travel mug and so
>far am shooting blanks. To me the MUSTS are:
>
>12 oz
>stainless steel
>dishwasher safe
>leakproof and the lid must fit OVER the mug nit inside so that when I
>fill the mug up it doesn't spill coffee everywhere when I put the lid
>on.
>
>If anyone can suggest a source of a mug like this, please let me know
>I want a half dozen!!!
>
>Walt

Well I might be a bit late to the party, but this topic is right up my
alley because I sip coffee all day and am a professional driver.

I prefer to drink my brew from a ceramic mug but the deteriorated
condition of our interstates, especially the right lanes, warrants a
vessel with a lid to avoid wasting any precioius brew.

I use a SS inside/outside unit with a plastic lid and o-ring seal I
picked up at the Harley Davidson Engine Plant tour gift shop. The
marking on the bottom reads "Made in China" "Pacific Cornetta". I
found similar ones at Walmart but they don't fit my cup holder
properly.

I agree with others about a certain taste the coffee acquires from the
SS.

I'd love a glass mug with a leak-proof sippy lid! Also looking for a
large super-duper insulated non plastic lidded mug for my ice water.

Now about the driving comments...

First of all, you four wheelers all drive too fast and too close to
each other. These are the two main causes of accidents! Once y'all
correct these unsafe driving habits, then you can start to worry about
how distracting other activities are while driving. I gotta work out
there on those roads and y'all are seeking thrills, getting your
jollies, risking lives to gain a second or two in travel time. Our
roads literally are dangerous heavy industrial areas since thousands
of tons of trucks and freight are moving around at very high speeds.
They certainly are not race tracks. Don't believe those car ads they
show you on TV! You might have enough money to buy that fancy new
sports car, but if you can't afford your own race track you ain't all
that you think you are! You're stuck on the same public roads as the
rest of us. Remember next time you want to cut in front of that 18
wheeler 'cause your exit is coming... That truck can't crush your
skull if you're behind him! Or think this way: Is that driver really
paying attention? Do I trust him with my life? I don't even know him!

Me: Yes, I am an expert. Professional over twenty years and a million
miles and no accidents and proud of it.


  
Date: 29 Jul 2007 23:26:23
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
On Sun, 29 Jul 2007 12:47:39 -0500, Zeek! <Zeek!@bellsouth.net > wrote:


>First of all, you four wheelers all drive too fast and too close to
>each other. These are the two main causes of accidents! Once y'all
>correct these unsafe driving habits, then you can start to worry about
>how distracting other activities are while driving. I gotta work out
>there on those roads and y'all are seeking thrills, getting your
>jollies, risking lives to gain a second or two in travel time. Our
>roads literally are dangerous heavy industrial areas since thousands
>of tons of trucks and freight are moving around at very high speeds.
>They certainly are not race tracks. Don't believe those car ads they
>show you on TV! You might have enough money to buy that fancy new
>sports car, but if you can't afford your own race track you ain't all
>that you think you are! You're stuck on the same public roads as the
>rest of us. Remember next time you want to cut in front of that 18
>wheeler 'cause your exit is coming... That truck can't crush your
>skull if you're behind him! Or think this way: Is that driver really
>paying attention? Do I trust him with my life? I don't even know him!
>
>Me: Yes, I am an expert. Professional over twenty years and a million
>miles and no accidents and proud of it.

Thank you for reminding us that trucks are not on the road simply to
create an obstacle course for our driving entertainment.

Marshall


 
Date: 13 Jul 2007 13:52:16
From: pltrgyst
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
On Fri, 13 Jul 2007 09:11:18 -0400, Walter H. Lewis III <walt_l@hotmail.com >
wrote:

>I've been looking for what I consider the ultimate travel mug and so
>far am shooting blanks. To me the MUSTS are:
>
>12 oz

Does that mean 12 oz. or larger, or precisely 12 oz.?

>dishwasher safe

Hmmm -- why? All stainless ever needs is a quick water rinse.

Also, you don't mention whether you'd prefer one with or without a handle.

>leakproof and the lid must fit OVER the mug nit inside so that when I
>fill the mug up it doesn't spill coffee everywhere when I put the lid
>on.

Assuming you meant 12 oz or larger, I'd recommend the Nissan JMH-550:
http://www.thedailymug.com/thnilatrtujm.html. I've been through many travel
mugs, and have settled on this one. Meets all your criteria, except possibly
volume, since it is 20 oz. capacity (_my_ minimum 8;) ).

They also have a new version with a lever-operated lid, but I haven't seen it in
the flesh yet.

-- Larry


 
Date: 13 Jul 2007 16:45:54
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
On Fri, 13 Jul 2007 09:11:18 -0400, Walter H. Lewis III
<walt_l@hotmail.com > wrote:

>I've been looking for what I consider the ultimate travel mug and so
>far am shooting blanks. To me the MUSTS are:
>
>12 oz
>stainless steel
>dishwasher safe
>leakproof and the lid must fit OVER the mug nit inside so that when I
>fill the mug up it doesn't spill coffee everywhere when I put the lid
>on.
>
>If anyone can suggest a source of a mug like this, please let me know
>I want a half dozen!!!
>
>Walt

For drip coffee, the ultimate travel mug is a No-Doz pill.

90% of the flavor of hot drip coffee is in the aroma. So, what is the
point of a mug that puts a barrier between your nose and the coffee?

Marshall


 
Date: 13 Jul 2007 09:04:38
From: DavidMLewis
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
On Jul 13, 6:11 am, Walter H. Lewis III <wal...@hotmail.com > wrote:
> I've been looking for what I consider the ultimate travel mug and so
> far am shooting blanks. To me the MUSTS are:
>
> 12 oz
> stainless steel
> dishwasher safe
> leakproof and the lid must fit OVER the mug nit inside so that when I
> fill the mug up it doesn't spill coffee everywhere when I put the lid
> on.
>
Except for the dishwasher-safe part, the OXO Stainless travel mug fits
all your requirements: <http://www.oxo.com/OA_HTML/
xxoxo_ibeCCtpOXOPrdDtl.jsp?
section=10091&item=47318&minisite=10024&respid=53057 >.

Best,
David



  
Date: 13 Jul 2007 16:10:00
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
In reference to the OP; why S/S?

I'd like to find a good thermal mug with a ceramic/glass interior surrounded
by a thermal shell (plastic/steel/??). I don't know if it's purely chemical
or an electro-chemical reaction, but I can definitely identify S/S mugs in a
blind test. I want a chemically neutral material for my travel mugs, just
like my at-home cups.

--
Robert Harmon
--
http://www.tinyurl.com/mb4uj - My coffee pages.

http://www.tinyurl.com/2tnv87 - My 'Guidelines For Newbies' page.

http://www.tinyurl.com/2cr3e2 - I have things for sale here.




   
Date: 13 Jul 2007 17:19:41
From: *alan*
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug

"Robert Harmon" wrote

> In reference to the OP; why S/S?
>
> I'd like to find a good thermal mug with a ceramic/glass interior
> surrounded by a thermal shell (plastic/steel/??). I don't know if it's
> purely chemical or an electro-chemical reaction, but I can definitely
> identify S/S mugs in a blind test. I want a chemically neutral material
> for my travel mugs, just like my at-home cups.
>
> --
> Robert Harmon

If your taste buds are sensitive enough to detect stainless steel, then
they're probably capable of detecting the difference between ceramic and
glass as well. It's well-known that substances leech into (and out of)
ceramic vessels --- ever wondered why you encounter ceramic mugs with
coffee and tea stains? Have you ever seen a glass mug with a stain? It's
with good reason that kosher law will permit drinking milk from a glass mug
that was yesterday used for chicken broth, yet demands that ceramic cups be
assigned separate meat and dairy use.

--
Alan



    
Date: 13 Jul 2007 18:56:15
From: Scott Sellers
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
*alan* <in_flagrante@hotmail.com >:

>"Robert Harmon" wrote

>> In reference to the OP; why S/S?
>>
>> I'd like to find a good thermal mug with a ceramic/glass interior
>> surrounded by a thermal shell (plastic/steel/??). I don't know if it's
>> purely chemical or an electro-chemical reaction, but I can definitely
>> identify S/S mugs in a blind test. I want a chemically neutral material
>> for my travel mugs, just like my at-home cups.
>>
>> --
>> Robert Harmon

>If your taste buds are sensitive enough to detect stainless
>steel, then they're probably capable of detecting the difference
>between ceramic and glass as well. It's well-known that
>substances leech into (and out of) ceramic vessels --- ever
>wondered why you encounter ceramic mugs with coffee and tea
>stains? Have you ever seen a glass mug with a stain? It's with
>good reason that kosher law will permit drinking milk from a
>glass mug that was yesterday used for chicken broth, yet demands
>that ceramic cups be assigned separate meat and dairy use.

I "taste" stainless as well, at least the stainless "thermos"
brand mug I've used. I don't know if it's so much a flavor as a
some kind of galvanic saliva response to the metal.

I second the poster who brought up the importance of aroma.

In addition, IMO there is such a thing as being too thermally
efficient, at least in a mug you want to drink from. In the mug
in question, if the coffee goes in scalding hot, it will remain
so for at least 15-20 minutes. Not a good situation on a 10
minute drive.

I'm currently looking for a quality go-cup which allows the
coffee to hit drinking temp in reasonable time.

Scott S


--
Scott Sellers


     
Date: 14 Jul 2007 03:42:18
From: PT
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
So - you set off on a drive of 10 minutes with scalding hot coffee in one
hand, and probably, your cell phone in the other and end up off the side of
the road or smashed into the back of the car in front of you.
Brilliant!!
Paul


"Scott Sellers" <scottsellers@mindspring.com > wrote in message
news:f78hsf$odc$1@news.datemas.de...
> *alan* <in_flagrante@hotmail.com>:
>
>>"Robert Harmon" wrote
>
>>> In reference to the OP; why S/S?
>>>
>>> I'd like to find a good thermal mug with a ceramic/glass interior
>>> surrounded by a thermal shell (plastic/steel/??). I don't know if it's
>>> purely chemical or an electro-chemical reaction, but I can definitely
>>> identify S/S mugs in a blind test. I want a chemically neutral material
>>> for my travel mugs, just like my at-home cups.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Robert Harmon
>
>>If your taste buds are sensitive enough to detect stainless
>>steel, then they're probably capable of detecting the difference
>>between ceramic and glass as well. It's well-known that
>>substances leech into (and out of) ceramic vessels --- ever
>>wondered why you encounter ceramic mugs with coffee and tea
>>stains? Have you ever seen a glass mug with a stain? It's with
>>good reason that kosher law will permit drinking milk from a
>>glass mug that was yesterday used for chicken broth, yet demands
>>that ceramic cups be assigned separate meat and dairy use.
>
> I "taste" stainless as well, at least the stainless "thermos"
> brand mug I've used. I don't know if it's so much a flavor as a
> some kind of galvanic saliva response to the metal.
>
> I second the poster who brought up the importance of aroma.
>
> In addition, IMO there is such a thing as being too thermally
> efficient, at least in a mug you want to drink from. In the mug
> in question, if the coffee goes in scalding hot, it will remain
> so for at least 15-20 minutes. Not a good situation on a 10
> minute drive.
>
> I'm currently looking for a quality go-cup which allows the
> coffee to hit drinking temp in reasonable time.
>
> Scott S
>
>
> --
> Scott Sellers


      
Date: 15 Jul 2007 20:13:35
From: Scott Sellers
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
PT <thomaspz@bigpond.com >:
>So - you set off on a drive of 10 minutes with scalding hot
>coffee in one hand, and probably, your cell phone in the other

No. What makes you think that?

>and end up off the side of the road or smashed into the back of
>the car in front of you.

No. I know when to pick up the cup, when to drink, and when
*not* to.

Simple stuff.

Kinda like not top posting.

>Brilliant!!

Smarmy jackass.

>Paul

Scott


>"Scott Sellers" <scottsellers@mindspring.com> wrote in message
>news:f78hsf$odc$1@news.datemas.de...
>> *alan* <in_flagrante@hotmail.com>:
>>
>>>"Robert Harmon" wrote
>>
>>>> In reference to the OP; why S/S?
>>>>
>>>> I'd like to find a good thermal mug with a ceramic/glass interior
>>>> surrounded by a thermal shell (plastic/steel/??). I don't know if it's
>>>> purely chemical or an electro-chemical reaction, but I can definitely
>>>> identify S/S mugs in a blind test. I want a chemically neutral material
>>>> for my travel mugs, just like my at-home cups.
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Robert Harmon
>>
>>>If your taste buds are sensitive enough to detect stainless
>>>steel, then they're probably capable of detecting the difference
>>>between ceramic and glass as well. It's well-known that
>>>substances leech into (and out of) ceramic vessels --- ever
>>>wondered why you encounter ceramic mugs with coffee and tea
>>>stains? Have you ever seen a glass mug with a stain? It's with
>>>good reason that kosher law will permit drinking milk from a
>>>glass mug that was yesterday used for chicken broth, yet demands
>>>that ceramic cups be assigned separate meat and dairy use.
>>
>> I "taste" stainless as well, at least the stainless "thermos"
>> brand mug I've used. I don't know if it's so much a flavor as a
>> some kind of galvanic saliva response to the metal.
>>
>> I second the poster who brought up the importance of aroma.
>>
>> In addition, IMO there is such a thing as being too thermally
>> efficient, at least in a mug you want to drink from. In the mug
>> in question, if the coffee goes in scalding hot, it will remain
>> so for at least 15-20 minutes. Not a good situation on a 10
>> minute drive.
>>
>> I'm currently looking for a quality go-cup which allows the
>> coffee to hit drinking temp in reasonable time.
>>
>> Scott S
>>
>>
>> --
>> Scott Sellers


       
Date: 15 Jul 2007 15:20:30
From: *alan*
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug

"Scott Sellers" <scottsellers@mindspring.com > wrote in message
news:f7dv5f$vfh$1@news.datemas.de...
> PT <thomaspz@bigpond.com>:
>>So - you set off on a drive of 10 minutes with scalding hot
>>coffee in one hand, and probably, your cell phone in the other
>
> No. What makes you think that?
>
>>and end up off the side of the road or smashed into the back of
>>the car in front of you.
>
> No. I know when to pick up the cup, when to drink, and when
> *not* to.
>
> Simple stuff.
[...]
> Scott


Sure, and I'd bet that everyone who's been involved in an accident related
to drinking coffee or talking on their cell phone while driving also thought
it was "simple stuff" and that they knew "when *not* to".

The point is that when that car lurches seemingly out of nowhere, you're
going to need something less a tenth of a second to react. Removing the
coffee cup from your lips (even if you just toss it aside) is going to cost
you time. You may *think* you're prepared and that you know "when *not*
to". Most accidents, however, involve an element of the unexpected . . .

It's egotistically and supremely confident folks like you who won't even
admit that coffee drinking could somehow impair their driving ability who
pose a threat on the roads, not only to themselves but to others around
them.
--
Alan
>
>
>>"Scott Sellers" <scottsellers@mindspring.com> wrote in message
>>news:f78hsf$odc$1@news.datemas.de...
>>> *alan* <in_flagrante@hotmail.com>:
>>>
>>>>"Robert Harmon" wrote
>>>
>>>>> In reference to the OP; why S/S?
>>>>>
>>>>> I'd like to find a good thermal mug with a ceramic/glass interior
>>>>> surrounded by a thermal shell (plastic/steel/??). I don't know if it's
>>>>> purely chemical or an electro-chemical reaction, but I can definitely
>>>>> identify S/S mugs in a blind test. I want a chemically neutral
>>>>> material
>>>>> for my travel mugs, just like my at-home cups.
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>> Robert Harmon
>>>
>>>>If your taste buds are sensitive enough to detect stainless
>>>>steel, then they're probably capable of detecting the difference
>>>>between ceramic and glass as well. It's well-known that
>>>>substances leech into (and out of) ceramic vessels --- ever
>>>>wondered why you encounter ceramic mugs with coffee and tea
>>>>stains? Have you ever seen a glass mug with a stain? It's with
>>>>good reason that kosher law will permit drinking milk from a
>>>>glass mug that was yesterday used for chicken broth, yet demands
>>>>that ceramic cups be assigned separate meat and dairy use.
>>>
>>> I "taste" stainless as well, at least the stainless "thermos"
>>> brand mug I've used. I don't know if it's so much a flavor as a
>>> some kind of galvanic saliva response to the metal.
>>>
>>> I second the poster who brought up the importance of aroma.
>>>
>>> In addition, IMO there is such a thing as being too thermally
>>> efficient, at least in a mug you want to drink from. In the mug
>>> in question, if the coffee goes in scalding hot, it will remain
>>> so for at least 15-20 minutes. Not a good situation on a 10
>>> minute drive.
>>>
>>> I'm currently looking for a quality go-cup which allows the
>>> coffee to hit drinking temp in reasonable time.
>>>
>>> Scott S
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Scott Sellers


        
Date: 16 Jul 2007 01:58:56
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
Some folks are just a *bit* self-righteous. I'll stipulate that the woman I
followed almost daily for five years on the I90 floating bridge in Seattle
was being far too casual with everyone's safety. Putting on a full face of
makeup while driving the reversible lane during rush hour was irresponsible
& negligent.

I wouldn't equate that with someone sipping at a drink with one hand while
driving with the other. You might as well insist that everyone turn their
radios off & insist on absolute silence while the vehicle is in motion for
fear of distracting the driver. Let's forbid the use of a car horn for the
same reason & of course the emergency vehicles would have to forego the use
of sirens.

What some folks seem to be asking for is Orwellian in nature. Personal
responsibility & freedom to make one's choices for oneself is the basis for
a free society. Lord, please protect tonight & every night me from Big
Brother & his minions - Amen!
--
Robert Harmon
--
http://www.tinyurl.com/mb4uj - My coffee pages.

http://www.tinyurl.com/2tnv87 - My 'Guidelines For Newbies' page.

http://www.tinyurl.com/2cr3e2 - I have things for sale here.

"*alan*" <in_flagrante@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:M4xmi.1516$Dx2.1155@newssvr17.news.prodigy.net...
>
> "Scott Sellers" <scottsellers@mindspring.com> wrote in message
> news:f7dv5f$vfh$1@news.datemas.de...
>> PT <thomaspz@bigpond.com>:
>>>So - you set off on a drive of 10 minutes with scalding hot
>>>coffee in one hand, and probably, your cell phone in the other
>>
>> No. What makes you think that?
>>
>>>and end up off the side of the road or smashed into the back of
>>>the car in front of you.
>>
>> No. I know when to pick up the cup, when to drink, and when
>> *not* to.
>>
>> Simple stuff.
> [...]
>> Scott
>
>
> Sure, and I'd bet that everyone who's been involved in an accident related
> to drinking coffee or talking on their cell phone while driving also
> thought it was "simple stuff" and that they knew "when *not* to".
>
> The point is that when that car lurches seemingly out of nowhere, you're
> going to need something less a tenth of a second to react. Removing the
> coffee cup from your lips (even if you just toss it aside) is going to
> cost you time. You may *think* you're prepared and that you know "when
> *not* to". Most accidents, however, involve an element of the unexpected
> . . .
>
> It's egotistically and supremely confident folks like you who won't even
> admit that coffee drinking could somehow impair their driving ability who
> pose a threat on the roads, not only to themselves but to others around
> them.
> --
> Alan
>>
>>
>>>"Scott Sellers" <scottsellers@mindspring.com> wrote in message
>>>news:f78hsf$odc$1@news.datemas.de...
>>>> *alan* <in_flagrante@hotmail.com>:
>>>>
>>>>>"Robert Harmon" wrote
>>>>
>>>>>> In reference to the OP; why S/S?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I'd like to find a good thermal mug with a ceramic/glass interior
>>>>>> surrounded by a thermal shell (plastic/steel/??). I don't know if
>>>>>> it's
>>>>>> purely chemical or an electro-chemical reaction, but I can definitely
>>>>>> identify S/S mugs in a blind test. I want a chemically neutral
>>>>>> material
>>>>>> for my travel mugs, just like my at-home cups.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> --
>>>>>> Robert Harmon
>>>>
>>>>>If your taste buds are sensitive enough to detect stainless
>>>>>steel, then they're probably capable of detecting the difference
>>>>>between ceramic and glass as well. It's well-known that
>>>>>substances leech into (and out of) ceramic vessels --- ever
>>>>>wondered why you encounter ceramic mugs with coffee and tea
>>>>>stains? Have you ever seen a glass mug with a stain? It's with
>>>>>good reason that kosher law will permit drinking milk from a
>>>>>glass mug that was yesterday used for chicken broth, yet demands
>>>>>that ceramic cups be assigned separate meat and dairy use.
>>>>
>>>> I "taste" stainless as well, at least the stainless "thermos"
>>>> brand mug I've used. I don't know if it's so much a flavor as a
>>>> some kind of galvanic saliva response to the metal.
>>>>
>>>> I second the poster who brought up the importance of aroma.
>>>>
>>>> In addition, IMO there is such a thing as being too thermally
>>>> efficient, at least in a mug you want to drink from. In the mug
>>>> in question, if the coffee goes in scalding hot, it will remain
>>>> so for at least 15-20 minutes. Not a good situation on a 10
>>>> minute drive.
>>>>
>>>> I'm currently looking for a quality go-cup which allows the
>>>> coffee to hit drinking temp in reasonable time.
>>>>
>>>> Scott S
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Scott Sellers


         
Date: 16 Jul 2007 02:37:48
From: *alan*
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug

"Robert Harmon" <r_h_harmon@Zhotmail.com > wrote in message
news:AhAmi.8675$zA4.8054@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> Some folks are just a *bit* self-righteous. I'll stipulate that the woman
> I followed almost daily for five years on the I90 floating bridge in
> Seattle was being far too casual with everyone's safety. Putting on a full
> face of makeup while driving the reversible lane during rush hour was
> irresponsible & negligent.
>
> I wouldn't equate that with someone sipping at a drink with one hand while
> driving with the other. You might as well insist that everyone turn their
> radios off & insist on absolute silence while the vehicle is in motion for
> fear of distracting the driver. Let's forbid the use of a car horn for the
> same reason & of course the emergency vehicles would have to forego the
> use of sirens.

That's what's known as a "reductio ad absurdum".
I took issue with his overly confident assertion that he felt in complete
control while drinking a cup of coffee. The fact that he admits of
absolutely no possibility of impairment to his field of vision or to his
reaction time reveals the kind of driver-confidence that, unfortunately,
has killed people.
>
> What some folks seem to be asking for is Orwellian in nature. Personal
> responsibility & freedom to make one's choices for oneself is the basis
> for a free society. Lord, please protect tonight & every night me from Big
> Brother & his minions - Amen!
> --
> Robert Harmon

And protect us all from overly-confident coffee-slurping drivers.






>
> "*alan*" <in_flagrante@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:M4xmi.1516$Dx2.1155@newssvr17.news.prodigy.net...
>>
>> "Scott Sellers" <scottsellers@mindspring.com> wrote in message
>> news:f7dv5f$vfh$1@news.datemas.de...
>>> PT <thomaspz@bigpond.com>:
>>>>So - you set off on a drive of 10 minutes with scalding hot
>>>>coffee in one hand, and probably, your cell phone in the other
>>>
>>> No. What makes you think that?
>>>
>>>>and end up off the side of the road or smashed into the back of
>>>>the car in front of you.
>>>
>>> No. I know when to pick up the cup, when to drink, and when
>>> *not* to.
>>>
>>> Simple stuff.
>> [...]
>>> Scott
>>
>>
>> Sure, and I'd bet that everyone who's been involved in an accident
>> related to drinking coffee or talking on their cell phone while driving
>> also thought it was "simple stuff" and that they knew "when *not* to".
>>
>> The point is that when that car lurches seemingly out of nowhere, you're
>> going to need something less a tenth of a second to react. Removing the
>> coffee cup from your lips (even if you just toss it aside) is going to
>> cost you time. You may *think* you're prepared and that you know "when
>> *not* to". Most accidents, however, involve an element of the unexpected
>> . . .
>>
>> It's egotistically and supremely confident folks like you who won't even
>> admit that coffee drinking could somehow impair their driving ability who
>> pose a threat on the roads, not only to themselves but to others around
>> them.
>> --
>> Alan
>>>
>>>
>>>>"Scott Sellers" <scottsellers@mindspring.com> wrote in message
>>>>news:f78hsf$odc$1@news.datemas.de...
>>>>> *alan* <in_flagrante@hotmail.com>:
>>>>>
>>>>>>"Robert Harmon" wrote
>>>>>
>>>>>>> In reference to the OP; why S/S?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I'd like to find a good thermal mug with a ceramic/glass interior
>>>>>>> surrounded by a thermal shell (plastic/steel/??). I don't know if
>>>>>>> it's
>>>>>>> purely chemical or an electro-chemical reaction, but I can
>>>>>>> definitely
>>>>>>> identify S/S mugs in a blind test. I want a chemically neutral
>>>>>>> material
>>>>>>> for my travel mugs, just like my at-home cups.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> --
>>>>>>> Robert Harmon
>>>>>
>>>>>>If your taste buds are sensitive enough to detect stainless
>>>>>>steel, then they're probably capable of detecting the difference
>>>>>>between ceramic and glass as well. It's well-known that
>>>>>>substances leech into (and out of) ceramic vessels --- ever
>>>>>>wondered why you encounter ceramic mugs with coffee and tea
>>>>>>stains? Have you ever seen a glass mug with a stain? It's with
>>>>>>good reason that kosher law will permit drinking milk from a
>>>>>>glass mug that was yesterday used for chicken broth, yet demands
>>>>>>that ceramic cups be assigned separate meat and dairy use.
>>>>>
>>>>> I "taste" stainless as well, at least the stainless "thermos"
>>>>> brand mug I've used. I don't know if it's so much a flavor as a
>>>>> some kind of galvanic saliva response to the metal.
>>>>>
>>>>> I second the poster who brought up the importance of aroma.
>>>>>
>>>>> In addition, IMO there is such a thing as being too thermally
>>>>> efficient, at least in a mug you want to drink from. In the mug
>>>>> in question, if the coffee goes in scalding hot, it will remain
>>>>> so for at least 15-20 minutes. Not a good situation on a 10
>>>>> minute drive.
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm currently looking for a quality go-cup which allows the
>>>>> coffee to hit drinking temp in reasonable time.
>>>>>
>>>>> Scott S
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>> Scott Sellers


          
Date: 16 Jul 2007 14:07:32
From: Scott Sellers
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
*alan* <in_flagrante@hotmail.com >:

>"Robert Harmon" <r_h_harmon@Zhotmail.com> wrote in message
>news:AhAmi.8675$zA4.8054@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
>> Some folks are just a *bit* self-righteous. I'll stipulate that the woman
>> I followed almost daily for five years on the I90 floating bridge in
>> Seattle was being far too casual with everyone's safety. Putting on a full
>> face of makeup while driving the reversible lane during rush hour was
>> irresponsible & negligent.
>>
>> I wouldn't equate that with someone sipping at a drink with one hand while
>> driving with the other. You might as well insist that everyone turn their
>> radios off & insist on absolute silence while the vehicle is in motion for
>> fear of distracting the driver. Let's forbid the use of a car horn for the
>> same reason & of course the emergency vehicles would have to forego the
>> use of sirens.

>That's what's known as a "reductio ad absurdum".
>I took issue with his overly confident assertion that he felt in complete
>control while drinking a cup of coffee. The fact that he admits of
>absolutely no possibility of impairment to his field of vision or to his
>reaction time reveals the kind of driver-confidence that, unfortunately,
>has killed people.

Again, these are completely unwarranted and unsupported
assertions about my position, piled upon completely unwarranted
and unsupported flights of fancy about my habits and my attitudes.

That's what's known as a straw man.

There are myriad possible distractions in daily driving. None
that Robert (or I) mention are any more absurd than the act of
drinking coffee. Add to the list shrieking toddlers in the back
seat, boorish (or boring) passengers, binding undergarments, etc.

Those easily distracted, prone to recklessness, or unable to pick
up a go-cup and drink without losing it, should probably keep off
the roads in all cases.

cheers,
Scott

--
Scott Sellers


        
Date: 15 Jul 2007 23:42:02
From: Scott Sellers
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
*alan* <in_flagrante@hotmail.com >:

>"Scott Sellers" <scottsellers@mindspring.com> wrote in message
>news:f7dv5f$vfh$1@news.datemas.de...
>> PT <thomaspz@bigpond.com>:
>>>So - you set off on a drive of 10 minutes with scalding hot
>>>coffee in one hand, and probably, your cell phone in the other
>>
>> No. What makes you think that?
>>
>>>and end up off the side of the road or smashed into the back of
>>>the car in front of you.
>>
>> No. I know when to pick up the cup, when to drink, and when
>> *not* to.
>>
>> Simple stuff.
>[...]
>> Scott


>Sure, and I'd bet that everyone who's been involved in an
>accident related to drinking coffee or talking on their cell
>phone while driving also thought it was "simple stuff" and that
>they knew "when *not* to".

I at no point advocated driving while talking on a cell phone.
Nor do I advocate picking up the coffee while undertaking complex
traffic maneuvers or in heavy traffic situations.

>The point is that when that car lurches seemingly out of
>nowhere, you're going to need something less a tenth of a second
>to react. Removing the coffee cup from your lips (even if you
>just toss it aside) is going to cost you time. You may *think*
>you're prepared and that you know "when *not* to". Most
>accidents, however, involve an element of the unexpected . . .

Thanks for pointing that out. Would you say there are any tenths
of seconds in daily driving that aren't fraught with imminent
destruction?

Can I work the cd player at any point, adjust my mirrors, or
maybe glance at a pretty girl?

>It's egotistically and supremely confident folks like you who
>won't even admit that coffee drinking could somehow impair their
>driving ability who pose a threat on the roads, not only to
>themselves but to others around them. -- Alan

???

I don't see how this is at all warranted.

Scott

--
Scott Sellers


         
Date: 29 Jul 2007 20:24:05
From: David Lewis
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
On 2007-07-15 16:42:02 -0700, Scott Sellers <scottsellers@mindspring.com > said:
> Thanks for pointing that out. Would you say there are any tenths
> of seconds in daily driving that aren't fraught with imminent
> destruction?

While this is getting well and truly off topic, and I hesitate to add
to the atmosphere of accusation that's creeping in (since you never
said you did any of the things people are talking about), the answer to
this question is yes; the problem is that we don't know which ones.
From a human factors point of view, driving is a terrible combination,
being both dangerous and boring.

Best,
David



     
Date: 13 Jul 2007 22:39:38
From: Tony Verhulst
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
S
> In addition, IMO there is such a thing as being too thermally
> efficient, at least in a mug you want to drink from. In the mug
> in question, if the coffee goes in scalding hot, it will remain
> so for at least 15-20 minutes. Not a good situation on a 10
> minute drive.

For such a short drive, my advice (worth all you paid for it) would be
to wait until it's over to savor your coffee. Distracted drivers on the
road is the last thing we need.

Tony V.


     
Date: 13 Jul 2007 20:17:34
From: *alan*
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug

"Scott Sellers" <scottsellers@mindspring.com > wrote in message
news:f78hsf$odc$1@news.datemas.de...
> *alan* <in_flagrante@hotmail.com>:
>
>>"Robert Harmon" wrote
>
>>> In reference to the OP; why S/S?
>>>
>>> I'd like to find a good thermal mug with a ceramic/glass interior
>>> surrounded by a thermal shell (plastic/steel/??). I don't know if it's
>>> purely chemical or an electro-chemical reaction, but I can definitely
>>> identify S/S mugs in a blind test. I want a chemically neutral material
>>> for my travel mugs, just like my at-home cups.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Robert Harmon
>
>>If your taste buds are sensitive enough to detect stainless
>>steel, then they're probably capable of detecting the difference
>>between ceramic and glass as well. It's well-known that
>>substances leech into (and out of) ceramic vessels --- ever
>>wondered why you encounter ceramic mugs with coffee and tea
>>stains? Have you ever seen a glass mug with a stain? It's with
>>good reason that kosher law will permit drinking milk from a
>>glass mug that was yesterday used for chicken broth, yet demands
>>that ceramic cups be assigned separate meat and dairy use.
>
> I "taste" stainless as well, at least the stainless "thermos"
> brand mug I've used. I don't know if it's so much a flavor as a
> some kind of galvanic saliva response to the metal.
>
> I second the poster who brought up the importance of aroma.
>
> In addition, IMO there is such a thing as being too thermally
> efficient, at least in a mug you want to drink from. In the mug
> in question, if the coffee goes in scalding hot, it will remain
> so for at least 15-20 minutes. Not a good situation on a 10
> minute drive. . . .
> Scott S

In addition to that aspect of too much thermal efficiency, one should also
consider that a certain amount of "fines" is present in brewed coffee, and
the longer the beverage is kept hot, the more "brewing" is actually taking
place, which, after a while, is going to make that coffee taste like crap.

Personally, I think that "travel mugs" are a silly and dangerous
affectation.
Enjoy your coffee shortly after it's been brewed, and certainly not while
driving...
--
Alan



      
Date: 14 Jul 2007 23:15:43
From: pltrgyst
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
On Fri, 13 Jul 2007 20:17:34 GMT, "*alan*" <in_flagrante@hotmail.com > wrote:

>Personally, I think that "travel mugs" are a silly and dangerous
>affectation.

The OP didn't mention driving. Perhaps he uses his travel mug as a general
drinking vessel, for coffe and cold drinks, in and around his hotel, when he
travels by air or other means -- as I do. I refuse to drink out of paper or foam
cups -- I can't stand them.

-- Larry


       
Date: 15 Jul 2007 10:32:37
From: *alan*
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug

"pltrgyst" <pltrgyst@spamlessxhost.org > wrote in message
news:854j93h49qi01pkr0e4u1mb20hldvufuu2@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 13 Jul 2007 20:17:34 GMT, "*alan*" <in_flagrante@hotmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>>Personally, I think that "travel mugs" are a silly and dangerous
>>affectation.
>
> The OP didn't mention driving. Perhaps he uses his travel mug as a general
> drinking vessel, for coffe and cold drinks, in and around his hotel, when
> he
> travels by air or other means -- as I do. I refuse to drink out of paper
> or foam
> cups -- I can't stand them.
>
> -- Larry

You're quite right --- although some posters clearly do drink coffee while
driving, the OP did not mention driving.
While I can understand your strong aversion to the tactile sensation of
drinking from paper or foam, I do think that, generally speaking, the flavor
of any coffee normally served in paper or foam in hotels, airports, or
airplanes is not going to be improved by being decanted instead into your
own personal travel mug . . .
--
Alan



 
Date: 13 Jul 2007 07:22:04
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: the quest for the ultimate travel mug
On Jul 13, 9:11 am, Walter H. Lewis III <wal...@hotmail.com > wrote:
> I've been looking for what I consider the ultimate travel mug and so
> far am shooting blanks. To me the MUSTS are:
>
> 12 oz
> stainless steel
> dishwasher safe
> leakproof and the lid must fit OVER the mug nit inside so that when I
> fill the mug up it doesn't spill coffee everywhere when I put the lid
> on.
>
> If anyone can suggest a source of a mug like this, please let me know
> I want a half dozen!!!
>
> Walt

Not sure on the refilling aspect, unless there's a portion of the lid
interfering or extruding to within the volume of the cup. Looking
over insulated table cups and thermos style travel cups a few months
back. The best regarded on Amazon seemed well advanced for insulation
technology -- getting 12 hours and more without appreciable
temperature drops. They were the most popular. Nikki or something
comes to mind for the brandname, but it's been awhile. Steel of
course, and nobody wants a leaker.