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Date: 07 Feb 2007 15:15:34
From: RicBrazil
Subject: what IS good coffee?
Hi Everyone

I live in Brazil, and it's really difficult here for me to get coffee
from other countries. There are cultural reasons, I guess, since
Brazilians tend to like Brazilian coffee only. I also believe there's
some kind of protection for Brazilian farmers and this kind of thing.
What we hear all the time is that Brazilian coffee is getting better
and better, with more and more producers investing in technology and
stuff so as to improve the overall quality of our coffee. The idea of
"gourmet" coffee, even though it's still quite new, has become more
and more widespread. Considering my limitations is this respect, and
the fact that I really like espresso coffee, I've been tasting lots of
Brazilian coffees and trying to make a selection of my favorite ones.
To my taste, I've been able to make lots of excellent espresso shots,
with good crema and everything. But, then again, I mean "to my taste."
I've had the opportunity to travel to the US and Europe a few times,
and I was able to taste coffee from other regions and even bring some
here and blend with Brazilian beans. I'm usually impressed by the
acidity levels of "foreign" coffees, which seem to be much higher. But
even in this respect I've made some progress by finding some Brazilian
beans with quite good acidity levels (again, to MY taste!) Well...
recently a friend of mine traveled to Costa Rica and brought me some
Britt coffee (Tarrazu, Poas and Central Valle). I've done some
research here and found out that opinions vary when it comes to Britt.
Even so, there were people who sounded really enthusiastic about it.
(Just one little detain that I know means a lot to most of you, guys:
I don't roast my coffee yet.) Well, I HATED all three Britt types! In
my understanding, they were way overroasted and way too bitter. So, my
question is: does the fact that I really like some Brazilian coffees
and hated a highly-regarded Costa Rican make me a complete stupid when
it comes to coffee tasting? Should I stop liking my dear Brazilian
shots and change my concepts? Of course I'm joking, but I'm really
under the impression that I know NOTHING about coffee... One more
thing, has any of you ever tried some "gourmet" Brazilian coffee and
liked it?
Many thanks,
Ricardo





 
Date: 09 Feb 2007 18:42:27
From: akiley
Subject: Re: what IS good coffee?
Brazil coffee has a reputation as a cheap base coffee for espresso
blends. But there are very good gormet Brazil coffees too. I've been
roasting my own and my all time favorite is a Brazil that I buy green
from Sweet ias. See below.

http://sweetias.com/coffee.southamr.brasil.html#cachoeira_yellow_bourbon

I don't even blend it with anything else. Just straight Cachoeira
yellow bourbon. To me it tastes as good as the Sweet ia's Monkey
blend.

In general, a good espresso shot needs good freshly roasted beans and
a lot of work and reading about technique. I've been at it for 6
years and finally feel I know what it's supposed to taste like and how
to achieve that. I only drink straight shots with no sugar or milk.
At least I hope I know what I'm doing! I don't often find a coffee
shop that can really make a good shot.

If I were you I would try roasting my own, even if in a frying pan or
oven. It's a bit smoky and smells pretty strong, but the green beans
last a long time unroasted. After they are roasted, start to loose
their great taste in one week or less. ... akiley



 
Date: 09 Feb 2007 09:49:33
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: what IS good coffee?
On Feb 9, 10:25 am, "RicBrazil" <ricgu...@terra.com.br > wrote:
> Hi Everyone
>
> Thanks a lot for your comments! In spite of the expensive shipping
> costs, I guess there are some site that would ship internationally...
> Do you happen to know any?
>
> Best wishes,
> Ric

I don't know the best, but Sweet ias may be good for what you
want. Sweet ias is getting big. Many people in America that want
coffee from different countries and they go to Sweet ias. The
order page below says what to do if you order from Brazil.

I think you will be better to buy Sweet ias green coffee beans and
roast. You can get a worker to roast for you. Sweet ias is much
time - eight weeks to ship from America to Brazil. A slow boat for
roast coffee they make for you. Roasting green beans is better and
very fresh. Freeze in bags what you do not drink soon, and keep beans
away from wet air.

May be a lot of money. Andy Schecter said to you above about Brazil
coffee, where to go. You can maybe look for the best very Brazil
coffees. Sometime there is very good coffee but it hides and few
people know about that. :)

Here is also Sweet ias to look. Buenos tardes, Ric.

https://id38.securedata.net/sweetias/secureorder.html



 
Date: 09 Feb 2007 07:25:35
From: RicBrazil
Subject: Re: what IS good coffee?
On Feb 8, 2:30 pm, "Flasherly" <gjerr...@ij.net > wrote:
> On Feb 7, 6:15 pm, "RicBrazil" <ricgu...@terra.com.br> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > Hi Everyone
>
> > I live in Brazil, and it's really difficult here for me to get coffee
> > from other countries. There are cultural reasons, I guess, since
> > Brazilians tend to like Brazilian coffee only. I also believe there's
> > some kind of protection for Brazilian farmers and this kind of thing.
> > What we hear all the time is that Brazilian coffee is getting better
> > and better, with more and more producers investing in technology and
> > stuff so as to improve the overall quality of our coffee. The idea of
> > "gourmet" coffee, even though it's still quite new, has become more
> > and more widespread. Considering my limitations is this respect, and
> > the fact that I really like espresso coffee, I've been tasting lots of
> > Brazilian coffees and trying to make a selection of my favorite ones.
> > To my taste, I've been able to make lots of excellent espresso shots,
> > with good crema and everything. But, then again, I mean "to my taste."
> > I've had the opportunity to travel to the US and Europe a few times,
> > and I was able to taste coffee from other regions and even bring some
> > here and blend with Brazilian beans. I'm usually impressed by the
> > acidity levels of "foreign" coffees, which seem to be much higher. But
> > even in this respect I've made some progress by finding some Brazilian
> > beans with quite good acidity levels (again, to MY taste!) Well...
> > recently a friend of mine traveled to Costa Rica and brought me some
> > Britt coffee (Tarrazu, Poas and Central Valle). I've done some
> > research here and found out that opinions vary when it comes to Britt.
> > Even so, there were people who sounded really enthusiastic about it.
> > (Just one little detain that I know means a lot to most of you, guys:
> > I don't roast my coffee yet.) Well, I HATED all three Britt types! In
> > my understanding, they were way overroasted and way too bitter. So, my
> > question is: does the fact that I really like some Brazilian coffees
> > and hated a highly-regarded Costa Rican make me a complete stupid when
> > it comes to coffee tasting? Should I stop liking my dear Brazilian
> > shots and change my concepts? Of course I'm joking, but I'm really
> > under the impression that I know NOTHING about coffee... One more
> > thing, has any of you ever tried some "gourmet" Brazilian coffee and
> > liked it?
> > Many thanks,
> > Ricardo
>
> Hi. First -- I think it's sad to hear you say you can't take what you
> want from coffees everywhere, if that's what you want to try. Nobody
> should say this is only good -- not that, and say you have to believe
> this. Take coffee from everywhere and learn. I have ordered Costa
> Rican coffee (ha... also looked at paperwork for Costa Rican permanent
> residency a few days ago - I'm curious. Somebody I know went to Costa
> Rica last year to live because the government said he could no longer
> work and drive because he drank a little beer). I thought the Costa
> Rican Tarrazu I had very good. This time I tried Mexican, but too much
> - all the same bag weight on two types Mexican. Soft, maybe mild. I
> like hairy fur in the back of my throat after drinking coffee. I
> really enjoy now some new African Zambia Estate for that. It's heavy
> and thick. Plus, it's red. I like to make coffee more red than
> brown. If you can try Arab African coffee, Arabica beans -- often
> people say they are better than South American Robusta. I don't know
> but they say. Yes, and to roast coffee beans is very good and fun,
> too. Good luck with new beans and enjoy.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Hi Everyone

Thanks a lot for your comments! In spite of the expensive shipping
costs, I guess there are some site that would ship internationally...
Do you happen to know any?

Best wishes,
Ric



 
Date: 08 Feb 2007 08:30:06
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: what IS good coffee?
On Feb 7, 6:15 pm, "RicBrazil" <ricgu...@terra.com.br > wrote:
> Hi Everyone
>
> I live in Brazil, and it's really difficult here for me to get coffee
> from other countries. There are cultural reasons, I guess, since
> Brazilians tend to like Brazilian coffee only. I also believe there's
> some kind of protection for Brazilian farmers and this kind of thing.
> What we hear all the time is that Brazilian coffee is getting better
> and better, with more and more producers investing in technology and
> stuff so as to improve the overall quality of our coffee. The idea of
> "gourmet" coffee, even though it's still quite new, has become more
> and more widespread. Considering my limitations is this respect, and
> the fact that I really like espresso coffee, I've been tasting lots of
> Brazilian coffees and trying to make a selection of my favorite ones.
> To my taste, I've been able to make lots of excellent espresso shots,
> with good crema and everything. But, then again, I mean "to my taste."
> I've had the opportunity to travel to the US and Europe a few times,
> and I was able to taste coffee from other regions and even bring some
> here and blend with Brazilian beans. I'm usually impressed by the
> acidity levels of "foreign" coffees, which seem to be much higher. But
> even in this respect I've made some progress by finding some Brazilian
> beans with quite good acidity levels (again, to MY taste!) Well...
> recently a friend of mine traveled to Costa Rica and brought me some
> Britt coffee (Tarrazu, Poas and Central Valle). I've done some
> research here and found out that opinions vary when it comes to Britt.
> Even so, there were people who sounded really enthusiastic about it.
> (Just one little detain that I know means a lot to most of you, guys:
> I don't roast my coffee yet.) Well, I HATED all three Britt types! In
> my understanding, they were way overroasted and way too bitter. So, my
> question is: does the fact that I really like some Brazilian coffees
> and hated a highly-regarded Costa Rican make me a complete stupid when
> it comes to coffee tasting? Should I stop liking my dear Brazilian
> shots and change my concepts? Of course I'm joking, but I'm really
> under the impression that I know NOTHING about coffee... One more
> thing, has any of you ever tried some "gourmet" Brazilian coffee and
> liked it?
> Many thanks,
> Ricardo

Hi. First -- I think it's sad to hear you say you can't take what you
want from coffees everywhere, if that's what you want to try. Nobody
should say this is only good -- not that, and say you have to believe
this. Take coffee from everywhere and learn. I have ordered Costa
Rican coffee (ha... also looked at paperwork for Costa Rican permanent
residency a few days ago - I'm curious. Somebody I know went to Costa
Rica last year to live because the government said he could no longer
work and drive because he drank a little beer). I thought the Costa
Rican Tarrazu I had very good. This time I tried Mexican, but too much
- all the same bag weight on two types Mexican. Soft, maybe mild. I
like hairy fur in the back of my throat after drinking coffee. I
really enjoy now some new African Zambia Estate for that. It's heavy
and thick. Plus, it's red. I like to make coffee more red than
brown. If you can try Arab African coffee, Arabica beans -- often
people say they are better than South American Robusta. I don't know
but they say. Yes, and to roast coffee beans is very good and fun,
too. Good luck with new beans and enjoy.



 
Date: 08 Feb 2007 08:27:04
From: stereoplegic
Subject: Re: what IS good coffee?
i love brazilians as well, and most espresso blends use a dry-
processed brazil as their base. which brings me to my next point: most
costa rican coffees are wet-processed or "washed", most brazilians are
dry-processed. washed coffees tend to be brighter, that is, higher in
acidity. unless you got a pulped natural costa, these would probably
be a little too bright for shots of espresso. pulped natural
brazillians are supposed to make very good straight shots.

RicBrazil wrote:
> Hi Everyone
>
> I live in Brazil, and it's really difficult here for me to get coffee
> from other countries. There are cultural reasons, I guess, since
> Brazilians tend to like Brazilian coffee only. I also believe there's
> some kind of protection for Brazilian farmers and this kind of thing.
> What we hear all the time is that Brazilian coffee is getting better
> and better, with more and more producers investing in technology and
> stuff so as to improve the overall quality of our coffee. The idea of
> "gourmet" coffee, even though it's still quite new, has become more
> and more widespread. Considering my limitations is this respect, and
> the fact that I really like espresso coffee, I've been tasting lots of
> Brazilian coffees and trying to make a selection of my favorite ones.
> To my taste, I've been able to make lots of excellent espresso shots,
> with good crema and everything. But, then again, I mean "to my taste."
> I've had the opportunity to travel to the US and Europe a few times,
> and I was able to taste coffee from other regions and even bring some
> here and blend with Brazilian beans. I'm usually impressed by the
> acidity levels of "foreign" coffees, which seem to be much higher. But
> even in this respect I've made some progress by finding some Brazilian
> beans with quite good acidity levels (again, to MY taste!) Well...
> recently a friend of mine traveled to Costa Rica and brought me some
> Britt coffee (Tarrazu, Poas and Central Valle). I've done some
> research here and found out that opinions vary when it comes to Britt.
> Even so, there were people who sounded really enthusiastic about it.
> (Just one little detain that I know means a lot to most of you, guys:
> I don't roast my coffee yet.) Well, I HATED all three Britt types! In
> my understanding, they were way overroasted and way too bitter. So, my
> question is: does the fact that I really like some Brazilian coffees
> and hated a highly-regarded Costa Rican make me a complete stupid when
> it comes to coffee tasting? Should I stop liking my dear Brazilian
> shots and change my concepts? Of course I'm joking, but I'm really
> under the impression that I know NOTHING about coffee... One more
> thing, has any of you ever tried some "gourmet" Brazilian coffee and
> liked it?
> Many thanks,
> Ricardo



 
Date: 08 Feb 2007 05:03:26
From: Andy Schecter
Subject: Re: what IS good coffee?
RicBrazil wrote:
> have any of you ever tried some "gourmet" Brazilian coffee and
> liked it?

The best known is probably this one:
http://www.daterracoffee.com.br/


--


-Andy S.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/andy_s/sets/


 
Date: 07 Feb 2007 23:51:20
From: Roger Shoaf
Subject: Re: what IS good coffee?
Ricardo,

If you like Brazilian coffee, then enjoy and do not worry that someone else,
somewhere else prefers something else.

--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
they come up with this striped stuff.


"RicBrazil" <ricguers@terra.com.br > wrote in message
news:1170890134.590078.234600@l53g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Hi Everyone
>
> I live in Brazil, and it's really difficult here for me to get coffee
> from other countries. There are cultural reasons, I guess, since
> Brazilians tend to like Brazilian coffee only. I also believe there's
> some kind of protection for Brazilian farmers and this kind of thing.
> What we hear all the time is that Brazilian coffee is getting better
> and better, with more and more producers investing in technology and
> stuff so as to improve the overall quality of our coffee. The idea of
> "gourmet" coffee, even though it's still quite new, has become more
> and more widespread. Considering my limitations is this respect, and
> the fact that I really like espresso coffee, I've been tasting lots of
> Brazilian coffees and trying to make a selection of my favorite ones.
> To my taste, I've been able to make lots of excellent espresso shots,
> with good crema and everything. But, then again, I mean "to my taste."
> I've had the opportunity to travel to the US and Europe a few times,
> and I was able to taste coffee from other regions and even bring some
> here and blend with Brazilian beans. I'm usually impressed by the
> acidity levels of "foreign" coffees, which seem to be much higher. But
> even in this respect I've made some progress by finding some Brazilian
> beans with quite good acidity levels (again, to MY taste!) Well...
> recently a friend of mine traveled to Costa Rica and brought me some
> Britt coffee (Tarrazu, Poas and Central Valle). I've done some
> research here and found out that opinions vary when it comes to Britt.
> Even so, there were people who sounded really enthusiastic about it.
> (Just one little detain that I know means a lot to most of you, guys:
> I don't roast my coffee yet.) Well, I HATED all three Britt types! In
> my understanding, they were way overroasted and way too bitter. So, my
> question is: does the fact that I really like some Brazilian coffees
> and hated a highly-regarded Costa Rican make me a complete stupid when
> it comes to coffee tasting? Should I stop liking my dear Brazilian
> shots and change my concepts? Of course I'm joking, but I'm really
> under the impression that I know NOTHING about coffee... One more
> thing, has any of you ever tried some "gourmet" Brazilian coffee and
> liked it?
> Many thanks,
> Ricardo
>